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Free League Publishing Announce Alien: The Roleplaying Game

For the first time in thirty years, Alien is returning to the world of tabletop role-playing with Alien: The Roleplaying Game! Coming to us from Free League Publishing, Alien: The Roleplaying Game will be a “beautifully illustrated full-color hardcover book, both presenting the world of ALIEN in the year 2183 and a fast and effective ruleset designed specifically to enhance the ALIEN experience.”

What’s really interesting about Alien: The RPG is that it comes with two distinct gameplay modes. One is the traditional long-form campaign based over several sessions, the other is what they’ve dubbed “Cinematic play,” a mode that is designed to help ease in players unfamiliar with RPG.

For others who may be trying roleplaying for the first time, there’s the “Cinematic” experience, a series of pre-generated storylines that can be played in a single sitting. The first one is called Chariot of the Gods, written by sci-fi author Andrew E.C. Gaska (Death of the Planet of the Apes). Härenstam compared it to the pre-made stories made for Tales From The Loop.

 Free League Publishing Announce Alien: The Roleplaying Game

“We wanted to make [Alien] an approachable game. Our most successful game to-date is Tales From The Loop. Of course it’s very different from this game, but there are some similarities to how we approach it,” Härenstam said. “In [Cinematic] mode, you play scenarios with pre-generated characters and sort of a core arc. They emulate the dramatic structure of an Alien film. It’s sort of built for one-shots and shorter play.”

Alien: The Roleplaying Game will ship with the single Cinematic storyline, Chariot of the Gods, written by Andrew Gaska (who has previously joined us on the AvP Galaxy Podcast) but according to Free League co-founder Tomas Härenstam there are plans for more.

Campaign-wise, the game is set several years after the events of Alien and Alien 3 and will explore the frontier life of the Alien universe as the characters push towards the Outer Rim.

The year is 2183little more than three years since the destruction of the Hadleys Hope colonyon LV-426, the disappearance of the USS Sulaco, and the closing of the prison and lead works on Fiorina 161. The loss of a Sulacos Colonial Marine unit along with these Weyland-Yutani sponsored outposts, and the implications of corporate foul play stemming from these incidents, have created an air of distrust between the company and the United Americas.

 Free League Publishing Announce Alien: The Roleplaying Game

To add fuel to the fire, conflicts between the rival sectors of space have increased exponentially in the past five years. While unconfirmed, many believe that Hadleys Hope was a test site for one of Weyland-Yutanis bioweapons and that an enemy state sent a warship to nuke it from orbit. Others believe that the Company is working with a rogue nation to assume control of the colonies on the Frontier.

The 2180s are a dangerous time to be alive.

You can learn more about the game in i09’s interview with the publisher’s co-founder Tomas Härenstam or by heading over to the official Alien: The Roleplaying Game website and signing up to their mailing list!

Make sure you stick with Alien vs. Predator Galaxy for the latest on Alien gaming! You can follow us on FacebookTwitter, Instagram and YouTube to get the latest on your social media walls. You can also join in with fellow Alien and Predator fans on our forums!



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  1. Corporal Hicks
    Quote
    Welcome!

    This is the fourth official newsletter for the upcoming ALIEN tabletop RPG by Free League Publishing and Twentieth Century Fox. And we have big news!

    On May 25, 1979, ALIEN first graced the silver screen. Forty years to the day after the ALIEN franchise first inspired and shocked the world, we launch the official pre-order for the game at alien-rpg.com. This exclusive pre-order starts at 6 am PST / 9 am EST / 3 pm CEST Saturday May 25, and will end on August 4.

    The full printed game will launch late this year, but if you pre-order you don't need to wait to play! As a complimentary bonus gift for anyone who pre-orders via our webshop, we offer a meaty 168-page Cinematic Starter Kit PDF including the full-length Cinematic scenario Chariot of the Gods written by Alien RPG setting writer and sci-fi novelist Andrew E.C. Gaska. The Cinematic Starter Kit will be available for download via DrivethruRPG as soon as the pre-order purchase is confirmed.

    In addition, anyone who pre-orders the core rulebook will have the opportunity to provide feedback on the game before it goes to print and earn a play-tester credit in the final publication.

    https://ecp.yusercontent.com/mail?url=https%3A%2F%2Fgallery.mailchimp.com%2F2dcfb24fb7c8d0fb9c2f52040%2Fimages%2F6026b4be-53ce-402b-b784-9c7b94e8e774.jpg&t=1558545481&ymreqid=99331eb4-1f92-eced-1cfe-ed0001015d00&sig=FlRzhhwfIzNYoBJEbWaF1A--~C

    PRE-ORDER OFFERS

    The centerpiece of the pre-order is of course the Alien RPG Core Rulebook containing 300+ pages of mythology, original artwork, and custom mechanics for open-world campaigns as well as cinematic gameplay, based on our award-winning Year Zero game engine.

    In addition to the core rulebook, we offer a deluxe GM Screen, custom dice, a large starmap, and custom cards for weapons, NPCs and combat initiative. If you want to go all-in, we will offer bundles at great value.

    If you want a unique artifact, we will offer the 40th Anniversary Limited Edition Core Rulebook, with a special commemorative embossed book cover. Exclusive to this pre-order campaign, the 40th Anniversary Limited-Edition will never be printed again. You can see the design below.

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    WHY PRE-ORDER?

    In the past, we have done many Kickstarters to fund the development of our roleplaying games. This a pre-order, meaning that the game will be published no matter how many people take part in it. However, there are three good reasons to take part in this-preorder:

        You get the 168-page Cinematic Starter Kit PDF within days after purchase and can start playing immediately!
        By taking part in the pre-order you can provide feedback on the game before the core rulebook goes to print, and thereby help us making the game even more awesome.
        A big support for the pre-order will help us kick off development of modules and supplements for the game even sooner.

    More information about the pre-order, including the pricing, will be revealed on Saturday.

    Retailer? Official retail solicitations for the ALIEN roleplaying game and supplements will begin in July, but retailers are encouraged to contact us at info@frialigan.se with any questions to welcome them into the 40th Anniversary fun as well.

    Missed the previous newsletters? If you missed the first three newsletters, you can find #1 here, #2 here and #3 here. If you have questions or thoughts on the ALIEN RPG, don't hesitate to visit our forums on the Free League website or follow us on Facebook.

    /Free League Publishing

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    https://mailchi.mp/859b692f7762/pre-orders-for-the-official-alien-roleplaying-game-start-may-25?e=8becb4d032

    Some extra details:

    Quote
        STANDARD EDITION includes the Alien RPG Core Rulebook in a hardcover format with
        approximately 300 full-color pages of beautiful artwork and complete game rules for both the
        Cinematic and long-term Campaign game modes. A PDF of the book is included. Price: $49.99

        STANDARD BUNDLE includes the standard Alien RPG Core Rulebook, along with a deluxe
        gamemaster screen, two sets of custom dice (one set of 10 Base Dice and one set of 10 Stress Dice), a
        set of 50 custom cards (for initiative, weapons, and NPCs), and a set of useful maps and markers. A
        PDF of the book is included. Price: $99.99 ($50 discount on the total retail price)

        40th ANNIVERSARY LIMITED-EDITION offers the Alien RPG Core Rulebook with a special
        commemorative book cover. Exclusive to this pre-order campaign, the 40th Anniversary LimitedEdition will never be printed again. A PDF of the book is included. Price: $89.99

        40th ANNIVERSARY BUNDLE includes the Alien RPG 40th Anniversary Limited-Edition Core
        Rulebook, along with the deluxe gamemaster screen, two sets of custom dice (one set of 10 Base Dice
        and one set of 10 Stress Dice), a set of 50 custom cards (for initiative, weapons, and NPCs), and a set
        of useful maps and markers. A PDF of the book is included. Price: $139.99

        THE COMPANY SPECIAL EDITION includes everything from the 40th Anniversary LimitedEdition Bundle, as well as signatures from the Free League team on both the commemorative cover
        and a Limited-Edition 27” X 40” poster of the Alien RPG cover art by Martin Grip. Price: $249.99

     Fans can also customize their own package with individually priced add-ons:

        RPG Core Rulebook Standard Edition: $49.99
        RPG Core Rulebook – 40th Anniversary Limited-Edition: $89.99
        GM Screen: $24.99
        Base Dice Set: $19.99
        Stress Dice Set: $19.99
        Card Deck: $14.99
        Maps & Markers: $19.99

    https://www.bleedingcool.com/2019/05/22/free-league-gearing-up-for-alien-rpg-pre-orders-with-free-cinematic-starter/
  2. Corporal Hicks
    New newsletter is out.  :)

    Quote
    This is the third official newsletter for the upcoming ALIEN tabletop RPG by Free League Publishing and Twentieth Century Fox. In these updates we will be giving you insights into the development process and various aspects of the game itself.

    If you missed the first two newsletters from last week, you can find #1 here and  #2 here. If you have questions, don't hesitate to visit our forums on the Free League website or follow us on Facebook.

    This second issue will focus on Campaign gameplay, the second of the two game modes of the ALIEN RPG (the other being Cinematic mode, which we discussed last week). These two modes are each designed to create a different experience for you. Even some rules of the game only apply to one of the two game modes.

    Please note that the information published in these newsletters is subject to change during the development process.

    EXPLORING THE STARS

    While Cinematic mode lets you relive the intense drama och thrill of an ALIEN movie, Campaign play lets you go deeper, exploring the darkness of space over the course of a long campaign, spanning dozens of sessions. There is a lot more to do in the ALIEN universe than fighting xenomorphs!

    The key tool for Campaign play is the starmap of known space in 2183 AD. You can see a work in progress above. The map is based on the work of Scott Middlebrook, with additional work by our main setting writer and ALIEN franchise consultant Andrew E. C. Gaska, and graphic design by our Art Director Christian Granath.

    The star map is divided into broad sections such as the Core Systems, the Outer Veil and the Frontier. It also indicates which areas are under the general control of the main factions of human civilization, such as the United Americas and the Three World Empire, and includes many stars, planets and colonies from the ALIEN films as well as from video games, books and comics.

    The locations and factions on the map are further described in the Governments & Corporations and Systems & Planets chapters in the core game book, both written by Drew Gaska.

    TOOLS FOR CAMPAIGN PLAY

    Beyond the pure setting texts describing the world of 2183 AD, the ALIEN RPG core rulebook will also contain a powerful array of tools for the Gamemaster to use in Campaign play. These tools include extensive random tables to quickly create systems, planets, missions and encounters with a few dice rolls, turning the ALIEN RPG into an open-world, sandbox game. These tools are created by Free League co-founder Nils Karlén in cooperation with RPG designer Paul Elliott (Hostile, Zenobia).

    Campaign play and the tools for it are built around three distinct campaign concepts, determined by the types of characters you will be playing in your campaign. The three concepts are described below.

    SPACE TRUCKERS

    While not as lucrative a field as it was some fifty years ago, hauling refineries and cargo between Earth and the colonies is still big business. The advent of newer and faster FTL drives has significantly shortened the travel time between worlds, ensuring that starship crews don’t have to spend nearly as much time in stasis. Most companies compensate their crews not only for their work but for time lost in hypersleep as well.

    While most space truckers work for one corporation or another, there are also independent trader captains, smugglers, salvage crews, and privateers. Space is big, and legally or off the books, people and things always need to get from one side of it to the other.

    COLONIAL MARINES

    The United States Colonial Marine Corps represents the finest fighting force ever assembled. Technologically advanced and sporting all the latest in military hardware—a large amount of which is designed by Weyland-Yutani—the Colonial Marines are able to operate independently in nearly any environment. Combat teams are cross-trained and can be deployed at a moment’s notice to nearly any world without extensive briefing.

    Military occupations include vehicle operators and pilots, combat technicians, heavy weapons specialists, medics, engineers, and career officers. Naval occupations are found in the USCM support service of warship and starfighter teams of the United Americas Outer Rim Defense Fleet, and there are special military R&D programs across the spectrum that require volunteers. On the Frontier, there is always something that needs defending and some planet that needs pacifying.


    FRONTIER COLONISTS

    To most, becoming a colonist means you accept a hard life with little reward other than the satisfaction of a job well done. A colonist’s hands are always dirty and their feet are always tired. Living on the edge of civilization can have its benefits, however. Depending on your profession, the chance to strike it big could be right around the corner. Frontier Colonists are scouts and homesteaders, farmers and scientists, miners and doctors. Colonial Marshals keep the peace and Frontier journalists keep the colonies in the know. Colonists are the lifeblood of humanity.

    Stay tuned – and tell all of your friends to also sign up to this newsletter at ALIEN-RPG.COM!

    /Free League Publishing

    There's also a map on there. Can't zoom in well but there's a couple of factions in here.

    https://i.imgur.com/8ArS4XJ.jpg
  3. [cancerblack]
    Now my real question pertains to the longevity of this game. With D&D/Pathfinder you don't really need to worry about what material you wanna throw at your players because it has quite a variety of things to choose from, story and enemy wise.

    Just speaking ahead and surmising that even with the prequel material, there isn't a lot in the way of scenarios you can throw your players into. Especially not without running through the motions of adding up tension to inevitably describe what could be the 5th or 4th "first encounter" of an alien in a campaign module.

    This is my concern. The "cinematic" mode is actually their greatest asset and making it a very detailed thing with defined characters is a mis-step in my opinion. It'll run out of steam without support really fast.
  4. Monster Man
    Now my real question pertains to the longevity of this game. With D&D/Pathfinder you don't really need to worry about what material you wanna throw at your players because it has quite a variety of things to choose from, story and enemy wise.

    Just speaking ahead and surmising that even with the prequel material, there isn't a lot in the way of scenarios you can throw your players into. Especially not without running through the motions of adding up tension to inevitably describe what could be the 5th or 4th "first encounter" of an alien in a campaign module.
  5. Mr. Clemens
    And the 'differing agendas' idea is really important. For an Alien rpg, having a bunch of players who are all "we want to be a squad of marines who shoot aliens" would, narratively, be death on wheels.

    EDIT: to expand on that, of course more experienced rpgers will have their own agendas and things. But in a freeform game, having a conflicting agenda can make you 'the jerk who got Bob's character killed', whereas in this cinematic idea, you're simply playing your part to the best of your ability, because you're supposed to.
  6. Monster Man
    Cinematic scenarios come with pre-generated characters, specifically tailored for the story.




    https://media.istockphoto.com/photos/irritated-man-with-hands-out-in-stop-gesture-picture-id183380336?k=6&m=183380336&s=612x612&w=0&h=oZeFGKdQUWmFQTcQtyDTYtF_cRzb3FFY-0R9h9aDcAg=


    I understand why they did it, but I'll be skipping that part.
    I think it'll be useful for folks who like Alien but have no RPG experience. My own experience tells me it's likely to become unncessary/restrictive very rapidly unless they put out new cinematic missions pretty regularly.

    Probably for people who not only wanna jump into this quick one-shot, but also doubly serves the purpose of revealing what this game has to offer without investing too much time into an experience that won't last the day. Maybe for some people who can't also dedicate a lot of time into the hobby due to work or family things.

    I'm sure a more experienced DM can rework these stories into more filling feasts for his group but that's something else entirely.
  7. [cancerblack]
    I think it'll be useful for folks who like Alien but have no RPG experience. My own experience tells me it's likely to become unncessary/restrictive very rapidly unless they put out new cinematic missions pretty regularly.
  8. Mr. Clemens
    Cinematic scenarios come with pre-generated characters, specifically tailored for the story.




    https://media.istockphoto.com/photos/irritated-man-with-hands-out-in-stop-gesture-picture-id183380336?k=6&m=183380336&s=612x612&w=0&h=oZeFGKdQUWmFQTcQtyDTYtF_cRzb3FFY-0R9h9aDcAg=



    I understand why they did it, but I'll be skipping that part.

    I don't know if I'm supposed to know who that is, but it's still a great photo.  :D

    Still, I could see that mode being fun, in a 'How to Host a Murder' sort of way...
  9. Corporal Hicks
    Quote
    Welcome!

    This is the second official newsletter for the upcoming ALIEN tabletop RPG by Free League Publishing and Twentieth Century Fox. In these updates we will be giving you insights into the development process and various aspects of the game itself.

    If you missed the first newsletter from last week, you can find it here. If you have questions, don't hesitate to visit our forums on the Free League website or follow us on Facebook.

    This second issue will focus on Cinematic gameplay, one of the two game modes of the ALIEN RPG (the other being Campaign mode, which we will delve into next week). These two modes are each designed to create a different experience for you. Even some rules of the game only apply to one of the two game modes.

    Please note that the information published in these newsletters is subject to change during the development process.

    ACTS & PERSONAL AGENDAS

    A Cinematic scenario emulates the dramatic arc of an ALIEN film. Designed to be played in one or a a few sessions, this game mode emphasizes high stakes and fast and brutal play. Conflict between player characters is likely, and you are not all expected to survive. Cinematic scenarios come with pre-generated characters, specifically tailored for the story.

    A Cinematic scenario is divided into three Acts. For each Act, each player character is given a Personal Agenda, that is kept secret from the other players. A Personal Agenda can go against the interests of other characters or the group as a whole, but that's not always the case – the point is that you can never be sure about the motivations of the other characters.

    Personal Agendas for Act 1 and Act 2 are generally carefully phrased, to avoid overt confrontations between player characters to early in the story. Act 3 Agendas tend to push characters to a climactic endgame, sometimes pitting player characters in direct confrontation against each other – just like Ripley against Ash in Alien and Burke in Aliens.

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    CHARIOT OF THE GODS

    One Cinematic scenario, Chariot of the Gods, is included in core rulebook. This pre-generated scenario provides all the tools necessary to run your first ALIEN roleplaying game, and it’s a fun and easy way to learn how to play and tell your own stories on the Frontier.

    I Chariot of the Gods, the players take the roles of the crew of the USCSS Montero starfreighter. It’s designed to introduce the game to the players while at the same time take them for a thrilling, terrifying ride into space where no one can hear them scream. The scenario is designed for 3–5 players plus GM, and takes at least 4-5 hours to complete.

    Chariot of the Gods is written by author Andrew E. C. Gaska, lead setting writer for the ALIEN RPG and franchise consultant on ALIEN for 20th Century Fox, with editing and added gameplay aspects by game director Tomas Härenstam.

    More Cinematic scenarios will be published by Free League Publishing in the years to come. Some will be linked into longer narratives, where the outcome of one Cinematic scenario can impact the setup of the next – even if all player characters are replaced.

    Stay tuned – and tell all of your friends to also sign up to this newsletter at ALIEN-RPG.COM!

    /Free League Publishing

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  10. Xenomrph
    The Star Wars franchise handled RPGs (video game and pencil and paper) and "canon" by saying that the broad strokes of given campaigns were "canon" (overall events, NPCs, planets, equipment), while the specific characters and their minute-to-minute interactions were not. So what we can gather from the trailer and RPG description are that things involving Aliens happen in 2183, and having any Aliens anywhere post 2179 is a mild problem for Alien Resurrection unless you start really broadly defining "for all intent and purposes" (and for the record, I'm okay with that). That, and having Aliens tucked away in myriad locations (including Engineer/Space Jockey ships) wreaks havoc with "David created the Alien". :P

    One wonders if they're gonna use anything that Leading Edge had already brainstormed for their AlienS rpg lore.
    I'd love to see that, that would be a great (and appropriate) callback for long-time fans.
  11. SM
    I am anxious to hear from SM; his timeline breaks in 2179 and picks back up in 2294. Given his documentation of officially established events and that the RPG will be presenting "the ALIEN world of 2183", it looks like the RPG will be exploring new time, er, ground.


    Further info says these two guys are involved with the writing:

    Paul Elliott. Writer of campaign material such as system and mission generators, locations and adversaries. Designer of the awesome RPG Hostile.

    Cam Banks. Editor. Cam is a veteran of the RPG industry, having led the development of numerous RPGs such as Smallville, Leverage, and Marvel Heroic.


    Has anyone played these games to give some insight into them?

    I spoke to Joe LeFavi last year and we talked about how things like continuity aren't much of a big deal with RPGs.  You set up the setting, then whatever actual events transpire  are up the game master and players.  It's going to be different every time.  We also talked about how they have access to everything from Prometheus to Resurrection in terms of licensing.  So you can set a game or campaign at any point.
  12. farsightblogger
    I've been following Fria Ligan for a while, I interviewed some of their creators a while ago. Last year, I ran a campaign using their Coriolis game, which uses the same game engine as the ALIEN game. It was one of the best campaigns I've played in in my 35 years of gaming, and that was down to the quality of the product.

    Their design, presentation and basic passion for the hobby makes me incredibly excited for this. It's an amazing coming together of my favourite movie, game publishers and one of my favourite gaming systems.

    This is going to be amazing. I'm sure of it.
  13. Corporal Hicks
    There's .pdf files of the Leading Edge one floating around if you want a refresher. Personally i don't think their fluff was any good.

    Hmm, I might go lookin'... even if just for a walk down memory lane. I eBayed all my Leading Edge stuff back in '05 (probably to one of you lot :D ).

    It's in our Downloads section: http://www.avpgalaxy.net/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2006/12/Aliens-RPG-Core-Rulebook.pdf

    From the mailing list, for those that haven't signed up -

    Quote
    Welcome!

    This is the first official newsletter for the upcoming ALIEN tabletop RPG by Free League Publishing and Twentieth Century Fox. In these updates we will be giving you insights into the development process and various aspects of the game itself. If you have questions for us, don't hesitate to visit our forums on the Free League website or follow us on Facebook.

    This first issue will focus on something we already have received many questions about – the ALIEN universe itself, and how we will turn it into a game setting. But before we jump into that hot topic, we'll present the team behind the ALIEN RPG, just to let you know a little about us.

    Please note that the information published in these newsletters is subject to change during the development process.

    THE TEAM

    Tomas Härenstam. Game director and lead rules designer. Co-founder and CEO of Free League Publishing.

    Andrew E. C. Gaska. Setting writer and lead writer of introductory scenario Chariot of the Gods. Freelance franchise consultant on ALIEN for 20th Century Fox. More on Drew below!

    Martin Grip. Lead artist. Co-owner and in-house artist at Free League Publishing. Known for the breathtaking art in the Coriolis and Symbaroum RPGs.

    John R. Mullaney. Starship and vehicle artist. Known for his previous ALIEN work, as in the book Alien: The Weyland-Yutani Report.

    Christian Granath. Graphic designer and layout artist. Co-founder and lead art director of Free League Publishing.

    Nils Karlén. Social media wizard and master of random tables. Co-founder of Free League Publishing.

    Paul Elliott. Writer of campaign material such as system and mission generators, locations and adversaries. Designer of the awesome RPG Hostile.

    Cam Banks. Editor. Cam is a veteran of the RPG industry, having led the development of numerous RPGs such as Smallville, Leverage, and Marvel Heroic.

    Joe LeFavi. Brand manager. Through his company Genuine Entertainment, Joe brokered the deal for the ALIEN RPG on behalf of Free League Publishing, and he remains a key person in our partnership with 20th Century Fox.

    Brandon Bowling. Proofreader.

    Jenny Bremberg. Customer support.

    Anna Westerling. Event manager.

    ROLEPLAYING IN THE ALIEN UNIVERSE

    Most ALIEN films tell a horryfing and thrilling story with a tight focus. They generally don't reveal that much detail about the greater universe, instead leaving the viewer with largely unexplained names of locations and organizations to spark the imagination.

    Cinematic scenarios for the ALIEN RPG will work in very much the same way as the films. But for Campaign mode, we need to flesh out the universe and present the ALIEN world of 2183 AD to you as a cohesive whole. The full game will have meaty chapters on governments, corporations, star systems, planets, colonies, and xenomorphs, as well as a beautiful star map of known space for you to explore.

    The lead writer of the setting chapters is Andrew E. C. Gaska – author, senior development editor at Lion Forge Comics, and franchise consultant on ALIEN, Predator and Planet of the Apes for 20th Century Fox. With total attention to the minute details of the ALIEN lore from decades of movies, games, books, and comics, Drew's work is to preserve the essence of the expanded material and bring it in line with hardcore canon, filling in gaps where needed. In addition to his setting design, Drew is the lead writer of the introductory scenario Chariot of the Gods.

    To compliment Drew's work, RPG designer Paul Elliott (Hostile, Zenobia) is writing systems and missions generators for the Gamemaster to use, as well as modular locations and adversaries, to make the ALIEN RPG in Campaign Mode a truly sandbox, open-world game.

    The end result is a rich game universe in the deadly cold of outer space for you to explore. More details on the ALIEN RPG universe of 2183 AD will follow in later newsletters.

    Stay tuned – and tell all of your friends to also sign up to this newsletter at ALIEN-RPG.COM!
  14. FenGiddel
    I am anxious to hear from SM; his timeline breaks in 2179 and picks back up in 2294. Given his documentation of officially established events and that the RPG will be presenting "the ALIEN world of 2183", it looks like the RPG will be exploring new time, er, ground.


    Further info says these two guys are involved with the writing:

    Paul Elliott. Writer of campaign material such as system and mission generators, locations and adversaries. Designer of the awesome RPG Hostile.

    Cam Banks. Editor. Cam is a veteran of the RPG industry, having led the development of numerous RPGs such as Smallville, Leverage, and Marvel Heroic.


    Has anyone played these games to give some insight into them?
  15. Mr. Clemens
    One wonders if they're gonna use anything that Leading Edge had already brainstormed for their AlienS rpg lore. I don't have a horse in that race, but it will be interesting to see (not that I remember much).

    [EDIT: I like that, from the quote above, they appear to be defining 'xenomorph' properly as 'extraterrestrial life form' and not 'THE Giger Alien'.]
  16. FenGiddel
    This sounds very tasty:

    Cinematic scenarios for the ALIEN RPG will work in very much the same way as the films. But for Campaign mode, we need to flesh out the universe and present the ALIEN world of 2183 AD to you as a cohesive whole. The full game will have meaty chapters on governments, corporations, star systems, planets, colonies, and xenomorphs, as well as a beautiful star map of known space for you to explore.
  17. Mr. Clemens
    what happens to the dice that didn't land on a one or a six? Are they null and void unless I push them [...] ?

    That seems to be the case. What I'm wondering is how are varying degrees of difficulty accounted for? You'd be successful if you roll at least one six to hit that window. But would you also be successful if you roll at least one six to shoot a beetle at the other end of the hangar bay?

    Of course, what I quoted is just some guy's summary of the rules. I'm sure lots has been left out...
  18. Monster Man
    Very interesting, deviates from what I know in the D20 format. So lemme throw out a scenario here using these rules to see if I can grasp them --

    So I want to shoot out a window on this space station I inhabit to launch my friends and I out the airlock because my character is so evil and nihilistic for absolutely no reason. In order to accomplish this I would use a maneuver to draw out my pistol, which I aim directly at window with and because I have a skill of four in my shooting I use an action to fire my pistol proccing me to roll 4D6 worth of Skill Dice. Outta the 4D6 of dice I roll only two are sixes which lands one attack with the additional point of damage from the extra die landing on a six. Now this is where it gets foggy for me; what happens to the dice that didn't land on a one or a six? Are they null and void unless I push them or do they apply to something else?

    Also if surprise rounds don't exist in this system lets just say I won initiative.
  19. [cancerblack]
    Is this a D20 ruleset or something of their own concoction?

    Googling 'Year Zero Engine', I found this (follow link for better formatting):

    https://rpggeek.com/rpgsystem/43636/year-zero-engine

    Quote
    Here follows a condensed version of the Year Zero Engine rules. To play, you will need a number of six-sided dice in three different colors.


    USING A SKILL

    To use a skill, roll a number of Skill Dice (green) equal to your skill level, and a number of Base Dice (yellow) equal to the current value of the attribute connected to the skill. If you are using gear, you also get a number of Gear Dice (black) equal to the Gear Bonus. For your action to succeed, you must roll at least one six.

    Opposed Roll: When the rules call for an opposed roll, both you and your opponent roll for a skill. You need to roll more sixes than your opponent to succeed.
    PUSHING YOUR ROLL

    If you are desperate to succeed, you can push your roll. That means you grab all dice that didn’t show ones and sixes, and roll them again. You get a new shot at rolling sixes, but ones on Base Dice and Gear Dice have special effects when you push:
    For every Base Dice one on the table after a pushed roll, you suffer one point of trauma against the attribute you used for the skill. You also gain one Mutation Point (MP).
    For every Gear Dice one on the table after a pushed roll, the Gear Bonus of the item you used drops one step.
    THE SKILLS OF THE GAME

    There are twelve basic skills in the game, and one specialist
    skill for each role. Each skill is connected to one attribute.
    Endure (Strength): When the Zone takes its toll, when your legs won’t carry you any more, roll for Endure.
    Force (Strength): When wreckage or debris block your way and you need to push or lift something heavy, roll for Force.
    Fight (Strength): Roll for this skill when you attack someone in close combat. If you succeed, you inflict Weapon Damage. For every extra six, you inflict one more point of damage.
    Sneak (Agility): To move undetected, you must make an opposed roll using your Sneak score versus your enemy’s Scout score.
    Move (Agility): To get out of danger or to make a difficult climb or jump, roll to Move.
    Shoot (Agility): Roll for this skill when you fire a weapon at someone. If you succeed, you inflict Weapon Damage. For every extra six, you inflict one more point of damage. Each shot with a ranged weapon consumes one bullet or arrow. They also, except for some artifacts, need to be reloaded (costs one maneuver) after every shot.
    Scout (Wits): When trying to spot a Sneaking enemy, roll to Scout.
    Comprehend (Wits): Use this skill to understand an artifact from the Old Age.
    Know the Zone (Wits): Roll for this skill to identify a monster or phenomena in the Zone, and to know its traits or effects.
    Sense Emotion (Empathy): Use this skill to resist attempts to Manipulate you, or to read another person’s state of mind.
    Manipulate (Empathy): When trying to persuade, trick or seduce someone, roll an opposed roll using your Manipulate score against your opponent’s Sense Emotion. If you win, you opponent must offer you a reasonable deal.
    Heal (Empathy): Roll to get a broken friend back on his feet. Success means he recovers one attribute point.
    Intimidate (Strength): Roll when you use your sheer physical presence to get someone to do what you want. If you succeed, your opponent must do what you want or immediately attack you.
    CONFLICT

    Conflicts are played in turns. At the beginning of the first turn, everyone who takes part rolls for initiative – a simple D6 roll. Mutations and talents can affect the roll. The initiative roll sets the action sequence for all turns in the conflict.
    Actions & Maneuvers: When it’s your turn, you are allowed to perform one action and one maneuver, or two maneuvers. An action can be to:
    Use a skill
    Activate a mutation
    A maneuver can be to:
    Move one range step
    Seek cover
    Get an item from your gear
    Pick up an item from the ground
    Draw a weapon
    Reload a gun
    TRAUMA

    When you use a skill and push the roll, you can suffer trauma. This temporarily reduces the attribute score you used for the skill. If your attribute score reaches zero you are broken – unable to get up on your feet or use any skill for D6 hours or until someone Heals you. At that point, you regain one attribute point and can recover normally.
    Recovery: The requirements for recovery depends on type of trauma:
    Damage (trauma to Strength): Some rest and a ration of grub per trauma point.
    Fatigue (trauma to Agility): Some rest and a ration of grub per trauma point.
    Confusion (trauma to Wits): At least four hours of sleep.
    Doubt (trauma to Empathy): A moment of closeness with another mutant. It can be a talk by the campfire, a moment of shared silence, or physical contact.

    ---

    Now this is supposed to be a variation of those rules, so I guess we'll have to wait and see what changes. Still, seems pretty simple and elegant.


    Sounds good, my homebrew is a d6 game too. Much more interested in having good rules associated with an authoritative "official" stamp than i am about any lore or premade missions though, i can do that bit myself just fine.
  20. Mr. Clemens
    Is this a D20 ruleset or something of their own concoction?

    Googling 'Year Zero Engine', I found this (follow link for better formatting):

    https://rpggeek.com/rpgsystem/43636/year-zero-engine

    Quote
    Here follows a condensed version of the Year Zero Engine rules. To play, you will need a number of six-sided dice in three different colors.


    USING A SKILL

    To use a skill, roll a number of Skill Dice (green) equal to your skill level, and a number of Base Dice (yellow) equal to the current value of the attribute connected to the skill. If you are using gear, you also get a number of Gear Dice (black) equal to the Gear Bonus. For your action to succeed, you must roll at least one six.

    Opposed Roll: When the rules call for an opposed roll, both you and your opponent roll for a skill. You need to roll more sixes than your opponent to succeed.
    PUSHING YOUR ROLL

    If you are desperate to succeed, you can push your roll. That means you grab all dice that didn’t show ones and sixes, and roll them again. You get a new shot at rolling sixes, but ones on Base Dice and Gear Dice have special effects when you push:
    For every Base Dice one on the table after a pushed roll, you suffer one point of trauma against the attribute you used for the skill. You also gain one Mutation Point (MP).
    For every Gear Dice one on the table after a pushed roll, the Gear Bonus of the item you used drops one step.
    THE SKILLS OF THE GAME

    There are twelve basic skills in the game, and one specialist
    skill for each role. Each skill is connected to one attribute.
    Endure (Strength): When the Zone takes its toll, when your legs won’t carry you any more, roll for Endure.
    Force (Strength): When wreckage or debris block your way and you need to push or lift something heavy, roll for Force.
    Fight (Strength): Roll for this skill when you attack someone in close combat. If you succeed, you inflict Weapon Damage. For every extra six, you inflict one more point of damage.
    Sneak (Agility): To move undetected, you must make an opposed roll using your Sneak score versus your enemy’s Scout score.
    Move (Agility): To get out of danger or to make a difficult climb or jump, roll to Move.
    Shoot (Agility): Roll for this skill when you fire a weapon at someone. If you succeed, you inflict Weapon Damage. For every extra six, you inflict one more point of damage. Each shot with a ranged weapon consumes one bullet or arrow. They also, except for some artifacts, need to be reloaded (costs one maneuver) after every shot.
    Scout (Wits): When trying to spot a Sneaking enemy, roll to Scout.
    Comprehend (Wits): Use this skill to understand an artifact from the Old Age.
    Know the Zone (Wits): Roll for this skill to identify a monster or phenomena in the Zone, and to know its traits or effects.
    Sense Emotion (Empathy): Use this skill to resist attempts to Manipulate you, or to read another person’s state of mind.
    Manipulate (Empathy): When trying to persuade, trick or seduce someone, roll an opposed roll using your Manipulate score against your opponent’s Sense Emotion. If you win, you opponent must offer you a reasonable deal.
    Heal (Empathy): Roll to get a broken friend back on his feet. Success means he recovers one attribute point.
    Intimidate (Strength): Roll when you use your sheer physical presence to get someone to do what you want. If you succeed, your opponent must do what you want or immediately attack you.
    CONFLICT

    Conflicts are played in turns. At the beginning of the first turn, everyone who takes part rolls for initiative – a simple D6 roll. Mutations and talents can affect the roll. The initiative roll sets the action sequence for all turns in the conflict.
    Actions & Maneuvers: When it’s your turn, you are allowed to perform one action and one maneuver, or two maneuvers. An action can be to:
    Use a skill
    Activate a mutation
    A maneuver can be to:
    Move one range step
    Seek cover
    Get an item from your gear
    Pick up an item from the ground
    Draw a weapon
    Reload a gun
    TRAUMA

    When you use a skill and push the roll, you can suffer trauma. This temporarily reduces the attribute score you used for the skill. If your attribute score reaches zero you are broken – unable to get up on your feet or use any skill for D6 hours or until someone Heals you. At that point, you regain one attribute point and can recover normally.
    Recovery: The requirements for recovery depends on type of trauma:
    Damage (trauma to Strength): Some rest and a ration of grub per trauma point.
    Fatigue (trauma to Agility): Some rest and a ration of grub per trauma point.
    Confusion (trauma to Wits): At least four hours of sleep.
    Doubt (trauma to Empathy): A moment of closeness with another mutant. It can be a talk by the campfire, a moment of shared silence, or physical contact.

    ---

    Now this is supposed to be a variation of those rules, so I guess we'll have to wait and see what changes. Still, seems pretty simple and elegant.
  21. Monster Man
    Personally hoping it's not D20 myself. D10 roll-under would be my preferred option.

    I'm thinking they'll rip elements of Call of Cthulhu system which is another derivative of a D20.

    However, I got to say -- nothing on the website reveals it's gameplay method at all, just a cool trailer and all the nicely drawn artwork to accompany it.

    Regardless I'm gonna nab this and DM it for my friends, it's going to cool. Best part is that it's coming out this year.
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