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Creators Jim & John Thomas sue Disney to Reclaim Predator Rights

You lose it here, you’re in a world of hurt.

This line spoken by Blain, played by the charismatic actor Jesse Ventura in the 1987 classic film Predator, may never be more appropriate than it is today regarding the Predator franchise.

 Creators Jim & John Thomas sue Disney to Reclaim Predator Rights

So much is going on with Predator right now. The fifth film in the movie franchise titled “Skulls” is slated to go into production this June. The first Predator on-going Marvel Comic series in history is slated to begin this November. And within a couple weeks, a large anniversary update is expected for the Predator: Hunting Grounds video game.

And it all can come to a screeching halt with one swing of a judge’s gavel, with the news of original Predator creators James E. Thomas and John C. Thomas suing Disney to reclaim the rights to their otherworldly hunter that became famous back in the Summer of 1987.

 Creators Jim & John Thomas sue Disney to Reclaim Predator Rights

First reported by The Hollywood Reporter, the Thomas Brothers are seeking to reclaim Predator under copyright law’s termination provision, which permits creators to regain ownership of properties they have created after 35 years. And the Thomas Brothers’ legal council is claiming the effective termination date for Disney’s rights over the property is this Saturday, April 17th, and they’re suing to stop everything Disney has in the works.

The Thomas brothers are legally represented by Marc Toberoff who is known for representing the original “Friday the 13th” creator Victor Miller in a similar case, that has sadly tied up that franchise in legal red tape for years, paralyzing content for fans, and is a case that is currently under appeal.

Disney is represented by their own superstar legal eagle Daniel Petrocelli, who fought for the rights of Superman years ago for Warner Bros.

Both lawyers have won various copyright battles, but in the meantime, will the Predator fans lose? Only time will tell.

Be sure to keep your targets set on Alien vs. Predator Galaxy for all the latest Predator news! You can also follow us on FacebookTwitter, Instagram and YouTube to get the latest on your social media walls. Be sure to join in with fellow Alien and Predator fans on our forums as well!



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  1. Kailem
    Quote from: Proteus on Apr 18, 2021, 12:16:40 AM
    A friend in the industry (and close to Fox) thinks the best thing for the brothers to do is take a settlement if Disney offers, otherwise they'll have to shop around the rights again if that is what they want to do. Either way, they'll get significant money. If rights revert to them, he assumes the franchise will die off.

    Honestly, if they did end up getting the rights back and shopping them around, I wouldn't be surprised if that's what would happen.

    The fact that we're getting another movie so soon after the failure of The Predator feels like a sign that Disney is moving fast to try and make money from the property (yes it was conceived before the Fox takeover, but if they'd wanted to they could have canned it like they did with various other Fox movies, but instead they chose to move forward). It was part of the deal when they paid to buy Fox and it's now a part of their catalogue, and something they clearly want to profit from. If they no longer owned it, and had to pay to get the rights back to make any more movies/comics/whatever, there's no way they would. It's a franchise that has value, but when you're talking about the same company that now owns Marvel, Star Wars, Indiana Jones, even Alien, they're not going to bother.

    Obviously that would leave other studios to potentially pick it up, but I'm just not confident that any of them would. Not after they look at how less than amazingly well the last movie did.
  2. Proteus
    A friend in the industry (and close to Fox) thinks the best thing for the brothers to do is take a settlement if Disney offers, otherwise they'll have to shop around the rights again if that is what they want to do. Either way, they'll get significant money. If rights revert to them, he assumes the franchise will die off. He also thinks an injunction will take place ceasing production of Skulls and the comics. Ugh. Just... UGH.
  3. molasar
    Quote from: Voodoo Magic on Apr 17, 2021, 04:58:11 PM
    If the Thomas Brothers win, they'll only have 100% rights of future productions, not pre-existing.

    - - -

    "Under the termination provisions, prior "derivative works" "can continue to be" distributed as before.  17 U.S.C. § 203(b)(1).  Plaintiffs' recovery of the U.S. copyright to their Screenplay therefore does not prevent Defendants (Disney) or their licensees from continuing to exploit prior derivative works, including the original Predator film and TCFFC's five sequel films."

    - - -

    And let's all note for the canon record, that even the Thomas Brothers considers the AvP films as sequels!  8)

    Ok, I just took it that the first film is still tied somehow to their screenplay. Thus is a base product for the franchise.
  4. Proteus
    Quote from: Voodoo Magic on Apr 17, 2021, 04:58:11 PM
    Quote from: molasar on Apr 17, 2021, 04:45:48 PM
    Quote from: LSL on Apr 17, 2021, 03:47:50 PM
    If Thomas brothers wins, what they get? Only the bases of the first script? I mean, the visual of the creature and the universe built over the years is also included?

    It means that no one can rerelease the first film and profit on new products without their say.

    If the Thomas Brothers win, they'll only have 100% rights of future productions, not pre-existing.

    - - -

    "Under the termination provisions, prior "derivative works" "can continue to be" distributed as before.  17 U.S.C. § 203(b)(1).  Plaintiffs' recovery of the U.S. copyright to their Screenplay therefore does not prevent Defendants (Disney) or their licensees from continuing to exploit prior derivative works, including the original Predator film and TCFFC's five sequel films."

    - - -

    And let's all note for the canon record, that even the Thomas Brothers considers the AvP films as sequels!  8)


    Meaning Skulls being a future production, which could be halted? Guess we'll all find out soon or come June when it's supposed to shoot.
  5. Voodoo Magic
    Quote from: molasar on Apr 17, 2021, 04:45:48 PM
    Quote from: LSL on Apr 17, 2021, 03:47:50 PM
    If Thomas brothers wins, what they get? Only the bases of the first script? I mean, the visual of the creature and the universe built over the years is also included?

    It means that no one can rerelease the first film and profit on new products without their say.

    If the Thomas Brothers win, they'll only have 100% rights of future productions, not pre-existing.

    - - -

    "Under the termination provisions, prior "derivative works" "can continue to be" distributed as before.  17 U.S.C. § 203(b)(1).  Plaintiffs' recovery of the U.S. copyright to their Screenplay therefore does not prevent Defendants (Disney) or their licensees from continuing to exploit prior derivative works, including the original Predator film and TCFFC's five sequel films."

    - - -

    And let's all note for the canon record, that even the Thomas Brothers considers the AvP films as sequels!  8)
  6. molasar
    Quote from: LSL on Apr 17, 2021, 03:47:50 PM
    If Thomas brothers wins, what they get? Only the bases of the first script? I mean, the visual of the creature and the universe built over the years is also included?

    It means that no one can rerelease the first film and profit on new products without their say.


    Quote from: Master on Apr 17, 2021, 04:37:08 PM
    They also did wrote Predator 2, when whole design of the creature was well known. I don't know if it counts,  I won't pretend I know the US law.

    The difference will be if they were hired to write it or had it already written.


  7. Master
    Quote from: LSL on Apr 17, 2021, 03:47:50 PM
    @voodoo magic, I hope you're right


    If Thomas brothers wins, what they get? Only the bases of the first script? I mean, the visual of the creature and the universe built over the years is also included?

    They also did wrote Predator 2, when whole design of the creature was well known. I don't know if it counts,  I won't pretend I know the US law.
  8. LSL
    @voodoo magic, I hope you're right


    If Thomas brothers wins, what they get? Only the bases of the first script? I mean, the visual of the creature and the universe built over the years is also included?
  9. TomT
    Quote from: SM on Apr 16, 2021, 09:59:03 PM
    Quote from: TomT on Apr 16, 2021, 02:45:03 PM
    Quote from: Drukathi on Apr 16, 2021, 12:49:17 PM
    I think it is worth waiting for several years in order to get a good film that respects the viewer and the franchise, than get another exploitation film, which will cause a ton of hate and fail at the box-office, like its wbroken brothers.
    I think it's been decades since the last good film in the franchise. I really think someone should take away both franchises from 20th Century Fox/Disney, they are absolutely incompetent and very very stupid, Fox managed to f up both franchises for decades and Disney's first moves are even worse. They shouldn't be anywhere near both Alien and Predator, someone else should take the reins.

    "someone"  :laugh:
    I threw Lionsgate and Paramount as "someone"/alternatives.
  10. SiL
    The interesting thing is Disney isn't questioning the validity of their claim, rather the validity of their process for enacting it/the timeline they're entitled to.

    So even Disney's lawyers seem to concede this will happen - the real question is when.
  11. Voodoo Magic
    Quote from: LSL on Apr 17, 2021, 11:46:20 AM
    Disney can look at the financial results of the latest films involving Predator and simply give up. The character has not brought any resounding profit, and sometimes even losses, as in the last film. But they will not give up that easily, and that could be the start of a long legal dispute. Apparently we will have a considerable gap from the space hunter, and the movie "Skulls", which was already scheduled to start recording, will be canceled.

    First thing's first. Predator films have all been very profitable long-term. Even if the initial box-office tally of say "The Predator" was 160 million off an 88 million budget and you factor promotional dollars and say hey - that's not very good - these films make revenue year, upon year, upon year with sales and rentals, both consumer and industry. And apparently to directors like Predator 2's Stephen Hopkins, those residual checks they get are pretty good!  :)

    Second, none of us should use definitives like SKULLS "will be canceled". This whole problem might be pushed out to June 2022 or January 2023.

    Disney appears to be first and foremost  challenging the validity of the Thomas Brothers  claimed copyright termination date of April 17th 2021.

    Now it appears in the lawsuit that the Thomas Bros perhaps are even conceding that date may not hold up, so they included alternative dates in case "in the unlikely event the Court finds the Termination Notice is invalid, Plaintiffs' Second Termination Notice or Third Termination Notice is valid, with effective termination dates of June 14, 2022 or January 13, 2023, respectively." 

    So this is something we might not be dealing with as fans until 2022 or 2023 and Skulls, Predator comics, everything will continue this year without any threat of injunction.
  12. LSL
    Disney can look at the financial results of the latest films involving Predator and simply give up. The character has not brought any resounding profit, and sometimes even losses, as in the last film. But they will not give up that easily, and that could be the start of a long legal dispute. Apparently we will have a considerable gap from the space hunter, and the movie "Skulls", which was already scheduled to start recording, will be canceled.
  13. SiL
    The law specifically states that exploitations started before the cutoff are allowed, and I imagine Disney would successfully argue this counts.

    It could go the other way but I think that one will go Disney's way.
  14. Proteus
    My hope is that at the very least they allow for production to continue with Skulls. It would be heartbreaking to those that dedicated a couple of years to get this going (and bring jobs to many in Canada) only for it to be derailed so suddenly. Whatever happens to anything else in the future happens. But current projects should be allowed to continue.

    Man, I just don't feel good about any of this.
  15. SiL
    Yeah, split rights like that aren't unprecedented. But the wording of the claim gives me hope that they're just after a better deal, not to go nuclear on the whole thing. It leans heavily on "we just want a deal based on the known value of the property", not "we want to exploit this how we see fit". But that could be legalese.

    It's gonna be interesting to watch.
  16. Voodoo Magic
    Quote from: SiL on Apr 17, 2021, 02:20:05 AM
    QuoteThe law they are invoking is The Copyright Act, 17 U.S.C. §203(a), that provides authors with the inalienable right to recapture the copyright to their creative work, after a lengthy waiting period, by statutorily terminating without cause prior transfer(s) of copyright, provided advance notice of termination is given and accepted for recordation by the U.S. Copyright Office.

    They're pursuing ownership back. But this only applies to US copyright, not foreign.
    The very next paragraph of the claim (Paragraph 6, Page 2, under "Nature of the Complaint") points out that the termination right was specifically enacted to address the unequal bargaining position of the authors. This is why I specifically referred to the nature of the law they were invoking.

    Yes, it's basically a history lesson why the US Copyright Law was changed:

    "6. The termination right was specifically enacted by Congress in recognition of the unequal bargaining position of authors and to enable them to finally secure the financial benefits of their work, sold inevitably before its value could be fairly tested in the marketplace. See H.R. Rep. No. 94-1476, at 124"

    I'm definitely not predicting or pretending to know the Thomas Brothers' motives at all. All I was saying is they can stop all future business with Disney in the US if they win. They can produce a new Predator television show here in the US, or a film here in the US, both with different studios, and then those studio would negotiate a split foreign distribution deal / joint production if they wanted to release it overseas. They might just agree to split the production costs and keep their respective territory based revenue. I think there's already been precedent for that.

    We'll see!
  17. SiL
    QuoteThe law they are invoking is The Copyright Act, 17 U.S.C. §203(a), that provides authors with the inalienable right to recapture the copyright to their creative work, after a lengthy waiting period, by statutorily terminating without cause prior transfer(s) of copyright, provided advance notice of termination is given and accepted for recordation by the U.S. Copyright Office.

    They're pursuing ownership back. But this only applies to US copyright, not foreign.
    The very next paragraph of the claim (Paragraph 6, Page 2, under "Nature of the Complaint") points out that the termination right was specifically enacted to address the unequal bargaining position of the authors. This is why I specifically referred to the nature of the law they were invoking.

    Whether the Brothers intend to use the law to shut down all future productions is unknown; we don't know their motive. But they hardly win from this if they just use it to take the rights and shut down future productions. Disney is still free to exploit existing derivations to its heart's content, as well as retaining the rights in overseas territories. Skulls is already in production and wouldn't be affected.

    I'd like to imagine they're not being petty, and just want a bigger slice of the considerable pie their spec script created.


    EDIT

    On further reading Skulls might be affected, but the wording would allow Disney lawyers to argue the exploitation began before the date and so is protected under the provision of "existing derivative work".
  18. Voodoo Magic
    Quote from: SiL on Apr 16, 2021, 11:44:35 PM
    OK, so the reason I deleted my above comment is I realised I was speaking from ignorance and decided to actually read the complaint. There are two key points that basically address everything we're worried about (emphasis mine):

    Quote25. Under the termination provisions, prior "derivative works"  "can continue to be" distributed as before. 17 U.S.C. 203(b)(I). Plaintiff's recovery of the U.S. copyright to their Screenplay therefor does no prevent Defendants or their licensees from continuing to exploit prior derivative works, including the original Predator film and TCFFC's five sequel films.

    26. In addition, because the the Copyright Act has no extra-territorial application, the foreign rights to Plaintiff's Screenplay remains with TCFF. As a result, after the effective date of Plaintiff's termination, new derivative Predator works would simply require a license from the Plaintiffs, thereby enabling the authors to fairly participate with others at a level reflective of their work's market value. Accordingly, Plaintiffs' exercise of their copyright termination does not prevent the exploitation of the Predator franchise; it simply allows its original creators to, at long last, participate in the financial rewards of their creation, just as Congress had intended.

    Basically the law they're invoking was designed to allow authors to re-negotiate their cut for their works after the market value of their work was proved with time.

    This is the key thing. When they sold Hunters and royalties were assigned, nobody had any idea if it would take off and spawn a decades-long franchise, or crash and burn. Time has proved the market value of the piece; this law is specifically designed to allow authors to have better bargaining power to get more of the value their IP created.

    So is it about money?

    Sure.

    But it's about giving original authors the legal framework to get better compensation should their works spawn multi-million/billion dollar franchises, without being stuck with pennies-and-cents royalties grossly disproportionate to the actual value of the piece.

    Also worth noting, this law is not applicable to work-for-hire. The reason the Thomas Brothers have this option is they wrote Hunters on spec, not commission.

    It also states that the Brothers have presented two alternate dates, in 2022 and 2023, in response to Disney's claims that they're actually entitled to a longer waiting period (they're not, but they figured they'd hedge their bets and present the options just in case).

    So if the Brothers win the case and Predator dries up, it's because Disney/Fox is too f**king stingy to pay their licenses, not because they lost the rights.


    I read it too and I believe your second post still has some inaccuracies SiL.

    QuoteBasically the law they're invoking was designed to allow authors to re-negotiate their cut for their works after the market value of their work was proved with time.

    The law they are invoking is The Copyright Act, 17 U.S.C. §203(a), that provides authors with the inalienable right to recapture the copyright to their creative work, after a lengthy waiting period, by statutorily terminating without cause prior transfer(s) of copyright, provided advance notice of termination is given and accepted for recordation by the U.S. Copyright Office.

    They're pursuing ownership back. But this only applies to US copyright, not foreign.

    QuoteThis is the key thing. When they sold Hunters and royalties were assigned, nobody had any idea if it would take off and spawn a decades-long franchise, or crash and burn. Time has proved the market value of the piece; this law is specifically designed to allow authors to have better bargaining power to get more of the value their IP created.

    It's not to obtain better bargaining power. It's to obtain all the power in the US on future projects, the actual US copyright which won't require them to bargain at all. They can dictate US license fees as they see fit.

    QuoteSo if the Brothers win the case and Predator dries up, it's because Disney/Fox is too f**king stingy to pay their licenses, not because they lost the rights.

    If the Thomas Brothers win, they don't have to license Predator to Disney in the US for new Predator projects. Now the law allows Disney the exclusive opportunity to negotiate a US re-license of Predator with the Thomas Brothers after the Thomas Brothers served notice, but that ends the effective date of the termination. And that would also be recognizing and accepting the Thomas Brothers claim, like Skydance did with Cameron on Terminator.
  19. SiL
    OK, so the reason I deleted my above comment is I realised I was speaking from ignorance and decided to actually read the complaint. There are two key points that basically address everything we're worried about (emphasis mine):

    Quote25. Under the termination provisions, prior "derivative works"  "can continue to be" distributed as before. 17 U.S.C. 203(b)(I). Plaintiff's recovery of the U.S. copyright to their Screenplay therefor does no prevent Defendants or their licensees from continuing to exploit prior derivative works, including the original Predator film and TCFFC's five sequel films.

    26. In addition, because the the Copyright Act has no extra-territorial application, the foreign rights to Plaintiff's Screenplay remains with TCFF. As a result, after the effective date of Plaintiff's termination, new derivative Predator works would simply require a license from the Plaintiffs, thereby enabling the authors to fairly participate with others at a level reflective of their work's market value. Accordingly, Plaintiffs' exercise of their copyright termination does not prevent the exploitation of the Predator franchise; it simply allows its original creators to, at long last, participate in the financial rewards of their creation, just as Congress had intended.

    Basically the law they're invoking was designed to allow authors to re-negotiate their cut for their works after the market value of their work was proved with time.

    This is the key thing. When they sold Hunters and royalties were assigned, nobody had any idea if it would take off and spawn a decades-long franchise, or crash and burn. Time has proved the market value of the piece; this law is specifically designed to allow authors to have better bargaining power to get more of the value their IP created.

    So is it about money?

    Sure.

    But it's about giving original authors the legal framework to get better compensation should their works spawn multi-million/billion dollar franchises, without being stuck with pennies-and-cents royalties grossly disproportionate to the actual value of the piece.

    Also worth noting, this law is not applicable to work-for-hire. The reason the Thomas Brothers have this option is they wrote Hunters on spec, not commission.

    It also states that the Brothers have presented two alternate dates, in 2022 and 2023, in response to Disney's claims that they're actually entitled to a longer waiting period (they're not, but they figured they'd hedge their bets and present the options just in case).

    So if the Brothers win the case and Predator dries up, it's because Disney/Fox is too f**king stingy to pay their licenses, not because they lost the rights.
  20. molasar
    Quote from: SiL on Apr 16, 2021, 11:20:55 PM
    That's not how it works. They would get the rights to the intellectual property of Predator, as the property is derivative of their work. The music and creature design were made as part of telling that story.

    Creature design is work for hire. There's a reason Stan Winston isn't credited in any of the movies his team didn't work on, and why nobody needed their permission to make the character.

    Is it 100% for sure? Any law citations for it that specific music and creature design are part of it?

    I have noticed you retracted your comment. Anyways it will be interesting to find out how it really works.
  21. Proteus
    Quote from: Lost_Hunter on Apr 16, 2021, 10:31:44 PM
    Wow no way, if Disney wins it's a crushing blow to creatives everywhere. They represent a larger evil. One company should not own everything. This is a franchise we love and it belongs with it's creators. Legally the rights should revert back to them. Clear right and wrong here.

    While I'm apt to agree with you, we don't know what the intentions are of guys who haven't done a dang thing in Hollywood in ages. For all we know they could be harboring some deep pettiness and decide, "Screw all of you! No one is getting this franchise!" and then live out the rest of their days sitting on property they don't intend on doing anything with other than gaining royalties. Also, going back into the hands of the originators isn't always a good thing. Am I saying Disney is any better? No. But at least we were set to have SOMETHING soon. A new film. New comics. Figures still going strong. And now all of that is about to come to a screeching halt.
  22. molasar
    Quote from: TomT on Apr 16, 2021, 08:47:07 PM
    Their ideas for both Alien and Predator, and what they've done with Star Wars (and I'm not even SW fan) tell me everything.

    Actually some of their ideas for SW comic books are quite good. Especially those with Darth Vader.



    Quote from: Lost_Hunter on Apr 16, 2021, 10:31:44 PM
    Wow no way, if Disney wins it's a crushing blow to creatives everywhere. They represent a larger evil. One company should not own everything. This is a franchise we love and it belongs with it's creators. Legally the rights should revert back to them. Clear right and wrong here.

    But what is good for them if the rights cover only a space hunter concept under name "Hunter"? Not the music, not a creature design.
  23. Lost_Hunter
    Wow no way, if Disney wins it's a crushing blow to creatives everywhere. They represent a larger evil. One company should not own everything. This is a franchise we love and it belongs with it's creators. Legally the rights should revert back to them. Clear right and wrong here.
  24. Bruno Borgia
    Really hoping Disney wins. If the brothers win, no more AvP anything, and merchandising from NECA etc. may also be in jeopardy. It would be a catastrophe. Also Disney has way more funds that they can invest into Predator than the brothers. People don't realize how bad it is for them to get the rights.
  25. SM
    Quote from: TomT on Apr 16, 2021, 02:45:03 PM
    Quote from: Drukathi on Apr 16, 2021, 12:49:17 PM
    I think it is worth waiting for several years in order to get a good film that respects the viewer and the franchise, than get another exploitation film, which will cause a ton of hate and fail at the box-office, like its wbroken brothers.
    I think it's been decades since the last good film in the franchise. I really think someone should take away both franchises from 20th Century Fox/Disney, they are absolutely incompetent and very very stupid, Fox managed to f up both franchises for decades and Disney's first moves are even worse. They shouldn't be anywhere near both Alien and Predator, someone else should take the reins.

    "someone"  :laugh:
  26. Proteus
    Perhaps Disney will flex their muscle and intimidate the brothers into a settlement out of court wherein Disney retains rights to any upcoming or future projects. The problem being is that lawyer that has dragged the F13 and Hellraiser settlement for years. Or one scenario could be like the Child's Play franchise where the studio held rights to the name and concept, which is why Don Mancini was only ever able to call his movies Chucky after Child's Play 3. And now you have a situation where the studio can make Child's Play content simultaneously with Don Mancini making his. Pretend the brothers don't win the right to the Predator name or the design but do win any content involving original script and character names like Dutch or ties to the first 2 films. Now they're allowed to do whatever they want with what they have. So you have Predator content as we now know it with films/comics/figures, while the brothers go off and make/shop around "Hunter" content.

    With all that said, don't think that happens and we see this franchise come to a halt starting with the new film and comics. This will get as messy as F13.
  27. BlueMarsalis79
    My honest opinion's that TLJ's actually rather by the numbers, it just looks unique against the backdrop of a largely formulaic franchise, that got about as formulaic as it can with RoS.

    Just completely different flavours of awful in the writing department.

    20th Century Fox's reactionary, you only need look at their X-Men film line up to see that fact, Disney's stubborn and sticks to their guns consistently, when that's good it is good (Marvel Studios) when that's bad it is bad (Star Wars).
  28. TomT
    Quote from: Nightmare Asylum on Apr 16, 2021, 09:05:17 PM
    Alien: Resurrection feels more like 90s Dark Horse schlock than self parody to me. Well, on second thought, the two might kind of be one and the same, given most of those comics from that era. :D I hate Resurrection's script, but Jeunet kills it as director - the thing just oozes style (literally oozes; the movie is gooey as hell!). I absolutely love the way he brought Whedon's shitty script to life, so I give it a pass.

    I probably could have gotten into The Predator as some silly, schlocky installment if it was as well-directed as Resurrection was. But the directing there was just as awful as the script, which is a real shame as I tend to love Shane Black.
    I actually agree, I kind of like Ressurection because it oozes style and personality of its director, I'd say every Alien film in Quadrilogy has unique trademark style and could be considered an artistic expression of its filmmaker and I always appreciate that, it sets Alien apart from all other franchises.
  29. Nightmare Asylum
    Alien: Resurrection feels more like 90s Dark Horse schlock than self parody to me. Well, on second thought, the two might kind of be one and the same, given most of those comics from that era. :D I hate Resurrection's script, but Jeunet kills it as director - the thing just oozes style (literally oozes; the movie is gooey as hell!). I absolutely love the way he brought Whedon's shitty script to life, so I give it a pass.

    I probably could have gotten into The Predator as some silly, schlocky installment if it was as well-directed as Resurrection was. But the directing there was just as awful as the script, which is a real shame as I tend to love Shane Black.
  30. TomT
    Quote from: Nightmare Asylum on Apr 16, 2021, 08:51:40 PM
    Quote from: TomT on Apr 16, 2021, 08:47:07 PM
    Quote from: BigDaddyJohn on Apr 16, 2021, 05:26:57 PM
    Quote from: TomT on Apr 16, 2021, 06:42:38 AM
    it could prevent Disney from making another piece of shit movie in this franchise for some time which is a good thing.

    Disney hasn't made any predator movie yet dude, lol.
    Their ideas for both Alien and Predator, and what they've done with Star Wars (and I'm not even SW fan) tell me everything. I can pretty much guarantee they won't make anything good out of those franchises, I wish I was wrong here, but it's Disney in nutshell. Lionsgate or Paramount should own both Alien and Predator, I can't see any other studio doing it justice today. 20th Century Fox should've lost their rights a long time ago.

    Well, when they made something genuinely interesting with Star Wars in the form of The Last Jedi, the internet screamed at them incessantly and caused them to back peddle in a rather crass attempt to course correct with the shit show that is The Rise of Skywalker. I'll give them some props for taking the risk in the first place with TLJ, but those brownie points there do get stripped away after having seen the way they followed up on that movie.
    I didn't care about The Last Jedi, I didn't hate or love it, but I can see why so many people hated it. There are some strong moments and I liked Kylo Ren/Luke in it, but the entire Finn/Rose side quest is completely pointless and the movie feels almost like intentional parody on the franchise, scenes like flying super Leia in space make me question if it was made with a straight face or not, I hope not. But if it was made with a straight face, then I have some very bad news for both Johnson and Kennedy. I guess SW fanbase didn't like self-parody/meta approach, just like respective fanbases didn't appreciate it in Alien: Ressurection or Halloween: Ressurection ahah.
  31. Nightmare Asylum
    Quote from: TomT on Apr 16, 2021, 08:47:07 PM
    Quote from: BigDaddyJohn on Apr 16, 2021, 05:26:57 PM
    Quote from: TomT on Apr 16, 2021, 06:42:38 AM
    it could prevent Disney from making another piece of shit movie in this franchise for some time which is a good thing.

    Disney hasn't made any predator movie yet dude, lol.
    Their ideas for both Alien and Predator, and what they've done with Star Wars (and I'm not even SW fan) tell me everything. I can pretty much guarantee they won't make anything good out of those franchises, I wish I was wrong here, but it's Disney in nutshell. Lionsgate or Paramount should own both Alien and Predator, I can't see any other studio doing it justice today. 20th Century Fox should've lost their rights a long time ago.

    Well, when they made something genuinely interesting with Star Wars in the form of The Last Jedi, the internet screamed at them incessantly and caused them to back peddle in a rather crass attempt to course correct with the shit show that is The Rise of Skywalker. I'll give them some props for taking the risk in the first place with TLJ, but those brownie points there do get stripped away after having seen the way they followed up on that movie.
  32. Mr.Turok
    I do wonder for anything AVP related, will this be a hindrance for future content of AVP?

    Quote from: Samhain13 on Apr 16, 2021, 03:22:19 PM
    Quote from: Kailem on Apr 16, 2021, 03:13:12 PM
    If it turns out we were only days away from getting a new map and Isabelle for Hunting Grounds, and the last ever fireteam update was an American football player, that's gonna be really crappy.

    So my hate for that DLC can increase even more.
    I hope that the latest DLC/Update is worth it and strong enough for us in the long run....for however long this stop will keep us down.
  33. TomT
    Quote from: BigDaddyJohn on Apr 16, 2021, 05:26:57 PM
    Quote from: TomT on Apr 16, 2021, 06:42:38 AM
    it could prevent Disney from making another piece of shit movie in this franchise for some time which is a good thing.

    Disney hasn't made any predator movie yet dude, lol.
    Their ideas for both Alien and Predator, and what they've done with Star Wars (and I'm not even SW fan) tell me everything. I can pretty much guarantee they won't make anything good out of those franchises, I wish I was wrong here, but it's Disney in nutshell. Lionsgate or Paramount should own both Alien and Predator, I can't see any other studio doing it justice today. 20th Century Fox should've lost their rights a long time ago.
  34. [cancerblack]
    Quote from: LiquidMonster on Apr 16, 2021, 08:41:46 PM
    Best case scenario hear is that the brothers will take a nice "pay day"(settle with Disney) before any of this goes to court. They'll go through the motions but ultimately I think they'd be wise to take a settlement. I really think they would NOT win in regards to the actual DESIGN/USAGE of the iconic Stan Winston designed Predator Creature. It was designed AFTER filming had started and wasn't even the agreed upon *INITIAL* design(Fried Daffy Duck was). So yeah.....I predict they'll take a settlement. Depends on how long Disney wants to drag this out.


    hehehehehe fried daffy
  35. LiquidMonster
    Best case scenario hear is that the brothers will take a nice "pay day"(settle with Disney) before any of this goes to court. They'll go through the motions but ultimately I think they'd be wise to take a settlement. I really think they would NOT win in regards to the actual DESIGN/USAGE of the iconic Stan Winston designed Predator Creature. It was designed AFTER filming had started and wasn't even the agreed upon *INITIAL* design(Fried Daffy Duck was). So yeah.....I predict they'll take a settlement. Depends on how long Disney wants to drag this out.
  36. Kailem
    Quote from: Voodoo Magic on Apr 16, 2021, 04:16:35 PM
    Quote from: Kailem on Apr 16, 2021, 03:13:12 PM
    And the bad thing is we may have already seen the first results of this with the comics being delayed.
    I still think that delay is the Penguin deal. Because otherwise, by that logic, they would have delayed pre-production on Skulls until November too (or later). And who says any of these legal issues will be resolved that specific November month to tell comic retailers November for Predator anyway? The more profitable Penguin deal starts October - and that's the month the other title Predator variant covers would come out, then November is the ongoing Predator title #1 premiere. I think the good bet is still on that causality. :)

    Yeah you're probably right, I'd forgotten about the Penguin deal. My mind is just going to "worst case scenario" right now.

    Fingers crossed indeed that we get that Hunting Grounds April DLC update soon, since at least then it'll hopefully be an indication of whether or not everything going forward from tomorrow is going to be put on hold!
  37. Voodoo Magic
    ^ You take that back!!! >:(

    Quote from: molasar on Apr 16, 2021, 04:38:45 PM
    What situation will it be if the brothers win? Will they keep full rights to the story concept only or to everything with soundtrack and final Predator design included?

    Let's say if somebody wants to profit on music or creature design but not using any space hunter concept or Predator name do they need the brothers' legal approval for it?

    Quote from: LiquidMonster on Apr 16, 2021, 05:08:16 PM
    As Molasar stated below me, the brothers need to be careful here. I *highly* doubt they'd own the actual DESIGN of Predator which was from Stan Winston himself and I would presume NOT go to the brothers if they were to win. What a mess this is going to end up being.

    I can't even wrap my mind around what both of you are suggesting.

    The court rules for the plantiffs. And here's your rights to "Hunter" John and Jim.

    But we sued to get Predator back!

    I'm sorry, the original script you sold was called "Hunter".
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