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Updated: It’s Official! Disney Has Bought 20th Century Fox!

After weeks of speculation, it has finally been confirmed that Disney has purchased 20th Century Fox! The full press release doesn’t seem to indicate whether 20th Century Fox will continue to operate as it’s own entity under Disney’s ownership or if all of Fox’s properties will be absorbed under the Disney banner, nor does it specifically name-drop the Alien or Predator series when listing the bigger Fox properties.

“The Walt Disney Company and Twenty-First Century Fox, Inc. today announced that they have entered into a definitive agreement for Disney to acquire 21st Century Fox, including the Twentieth Century Fox Film and Television studios, along with cable and international TV businesses, for approximately $52.4 billion in stock (subject to adjustment). Building on Disney’s commitment to deliver the highest quality branded entertainment, the acquisition of these complementary assets would allow Disney to create more appealing content, build more direct relationships with consumers around the world and deliver a more compelling entertainment experience to consumers wherever and however they choose. Immediately prior to the acquisition, 21st Century Fox will separate the Fox Broadcasting network and stations, Fox News Channel, Fox Business Network, FS1, FS2 and Big Ten Network into a newly listed company that will be spun off to its shareholders.

Combining with Disney are 21st Century Fox’s critically acclaimed film production businesses, including Twentieth Century Fox, Fox Searchlight Pictures and Fox 2000, which together offer diverse and compelling storytelling businesses and are the homes of Avatar, X-Men, Fantastic Four and Deadpool, as well as The Grand Budapest Hotel, Hidden Figures, Gone Girl, The Shape of Water and The Martian—and its storied television creative units, Twentieth Century Fox Television, FX Productions and Fox21, which have brought The Americans, This Is Us, Modern Family, The Simpsons and so many more hit TV series to viewers across the globe. Disney will also acquire FX Networks, National Geographic Partners, Fox Sports Regional Networks, Fox Networks Group International, Star India and Fox’s interests in Hulu, Sky plc, Tata Sky and Endemol Shine Group.

“The acquisition of this stellar collection of businesses from 21st Century Fox reflects the increasing consumer demand for a rich diversity of entertainment experiences that are more compelling, accessible and convenient than ever before,” said Robert A. Iger, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, The Walt Disney Company. “We’re honored and grateful that Rupert Murdoch has entrusted us with the future of businesses he spent a lifetime building, and we’re excited about this extraordinary opportunity to significantly increase our portfolio of well-loved franchises and branded content to greatly enhance our growing direct-to-consumer offerings. The deal will also substantially expand our international reach, allowing us to offer world-class storytelling and innovative distribution platforms to more consumers in key markets around the world.”

 It's Official! Disney Has Bought 20th Century Fox!

Art by Michael Pucciarelli.

“We are extremely proud of all that we have built at 21st Century Fox, and I firmly believe that this combination with Disney will unlock even more value for shareholders as the new Disney continues to set the pace in what is an exciting and dynamic industry,” said Rupert Murdoch, Executive Chairman of 21st Century Fox. “Furthermore, I’m convinced that this combination, under Bob Iger’s leadership, will be one of the greatest companies in the world. I’m grateful and encouraged that Bob has agreed to stay on, and is committed to succeeding with a combined team that is second to none.”

So the big question is what does this all mean for the Alien and Predator franchises? I think the knee-jerk reaction to hearing that Disney now owns Alien and Predator would be to expect that the series would lose their R-rating and subsequently their edge. Disney is, however, certainly no stranger to putting out R rated films. For the better part of the 90s and into the early 2000’s, Disney owned Miramax Films which distributed many of Quinten Tarantino’s films.

Will Disney continue with Scott’s plans for the prequel series, will they turn their sights on rebooting the series or will future Alien films simply be dropped? How does this merge effect The Predator which is currently in post-production? Until we hear more from Disney, the shape the future of franchises is simply unclear for now.

Another concern I have following this deal is what happens to the publishers of the expanded universe. Since the 80s, Alien and Predator comics have been within the care of Dark Horse comics. My worry is that like with Star Wars, Disney may shift the comics away from their traditional publishers to the Disney owned publisher, Marvel.

As well as that, Disney doesn’t use Titan Books to publish their Star Wars novels. Titan has been publishing Alien and Predator books for nearly the better part of the last decade and in my opinion, they’ve been doing a great job with regularly publishing great books! I’d hate to see the expanded universe move away from Dark Horse or Titan.

Keep a close eye on Alien vs. Predator Galaxy for the latest Alien and Predator news! You can follow us on FacebookTwitter and Instagram to get the latest on your social media walls. You can also join in with fellow Alien and Predator fans on our forums!

Update #1 (15/12/2017) – This update is not directly related to Alien or Predator but is in regards to Deadpool’s move over to a Disney owned Marvel. Addressing that concerns that the buy-out would result in Deadpool losing it’s R-rating, Disney’s CEO Bob Iger confirmed that there is a place within a Disney owned Marvel for R-rated content:

““It [Deadpool] clearly has been and will be Marvel branded. But we think there might be an opportunity for a Marvel-R brand for something like Deadpool. As long as we let the audiences know what’s coming, we think we can manage that fine.” 

This should appease fans that are concerned that any Alien or Predator films under Disney ownership would automatically be PG-13 rated. Thanks to Russ for the news.

Update #2 (15/12/2017) – Those of you worrying about how this new buy-out might effect The Predator, fear not! All films that are currently in production are safe!

On the film front, employees are being told that films are still being greenlit and that production on such major upcoming releases as “Gambit,” an X-Men spinoff, is expected to still commence in the coming months.

Like Rice, Snider has stressed that over the next year and a half until the deal closes, it will be “business as usual” and she told staffers that she expects them “to do what we do at a high level of excellence and with our typical swagger.”

Hopefully this extends to all the current and upcoming merchandising releases. This comes via Variety. Thanks to Whos_Nick for the heads up.



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Comments: 212
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  1. The Old One
    Monopoly garbage, Alien joins the pile along with Dead Space, KOTOR, Mass Effect, Titanfall and more as franchises better than their contemporaries that will likely never return.

    Not without being edited for mass appeal.

    This is deeply disappointing but expected.
    Bloody disgusting.
  2. Perfect-Organism
    It would indeed be silly to do away with Fox as an entity.  It is a hallmark of Hollywood.  I could see Disney apply stronger brand management to popular properties like Aliens though.  I am not sure how it is now, but I would expect there would be a team that plots out the canon progression and creates a "style guide" that everyone has to follow. 
  3. whiterabbit
    I think it really wouldn't make any sense to get rid of the Fox moniker. There too much history there. Nor to even take over day to day operations any time soon. Probably best to keep it as a separate entity. Still I would not be surprised if parts of it is sold off.
  4. Corporal Hicks
    Yeah, really it's all going to depend what they actually do with the Fox company itself. I remember hearing they were keeping Searchlight and 2000 as was. We'll see if they keep the main Fox intact too.
  5. Dropship
    Quote from: Corporal Hicks on Nov 06, 2017, 08:39:27 PM
    Has there ever been a case of Disney inheriting or actually doing an "adult" franchise? Either way, I wouldn't panic just yet. This might amount to nothing.

    There is a sister company that is owned by Disney and they have produced r rated movies in the past, I can't remember the name of the company, touchstone or mirrormax I think?.... but I remember reading a article that had concerns about deadpool moving to Disney, it was thought that deadpool may be delivered by these companies in the future! Hopefully alien an predator can follow suit
  6. whiterabbit
    I think they actually still have the Disney Vault, as far as official media releases are concerned. However Song of the South is no where to be found in there. Pretty sure that's in a vault of concrete at the bottom of the ocean. :P I remember they attempted to erase that release once. Similar to how George tried to erase the star wars holiday special from existence but ultimately failed.

    Anyways movies get shelved for many reasons. Usually because no one can come up with a story that has anything to say or place to go.
  7. Wysps
    Quote from: whiterabbit on Jun 24, 2018, 04:29:18 AM
    Oh, yea, I forgot that there are a lot of people who are too young to remember when Disney used to actually lock away titles for decades. As far as I know some Disney movies are still locked away, meaning the best copies you can get are VHS. However in this new age, complete with digital copies and piracy, there's no point in trying to hedge the market. So yea guys, I was just joking about it.

    Then again, they probably won't be doing anything with either property for a while. So it might as well be the same as locking them up in the literal Disney Vault.

    Oh I remember the Disney "vault" days - I thought you were referring to actual live action films that were shelved for years on end.
  8. SiL
    The last time I remember them announcing they were opening their "vault" was about a decade ago. I think they've dropped the practice.

    I think the only ones still locked away are things like Song of the South that they'd rather scrub from their oeuvre.
  9. whiterabbit
    Oh, yea, I forgot that there are a lot of people who are too young to remember when Disney used to actually lock away titles for decades. As far as I know some Disney movies are still locked away, meaning the best copies you can get are VHS. However in this new age, complete with digital copies and piracy, there's no point in trying to hedge the market. So yea guys, I was just joking about it.

    Then again, they probably won't be doing anything with either property for a while. So it might as well be the same as locking them up in the literal Disney Vault.
  10. Magegg
    Yeah, well... I don't really see Disney working with these franchises anyway. Maybe they will rent the rights to NBCUniversal. They need to recover some money after the Fox buyout.
  11. Wysps
    Quote from: whiterabbit on Jun 23, 2018, 08:03:16 AM
    oh good god people the one thing I know for certain that Disney loves to do is lock away content for decades. As soon as they get alien and predator they are going to put it in the vault and we will never see it again for 50 years.

    I don't recall them handling other popular franchises in this way, but I'm definitely out of the loop.  What other franchises have they locked away?  Alien and Predator are staples of the horror/scifi realm - I wouldn't think they'd do that two these two.  Maybe remake after remake (which I don't think is a better alternative) but locked away for decades? 
  12. whiterabbit
    oh good god people the one thing I know for certain that Disney loves to do is lock away content for decades. As soon as they get alien and predator they are going to put it in the vault and we will never see it again for 50 years.
  13. Richman678
    Well if I was Disney the first thing I would do is green light Alien Isolation 2. Then I would let Ridley either finish his trilogy, or he needs to set up a TV show for their streaming service. This time get a good writer please.

    Other than that maybe a stand alone Star Wars story where Darth Vader leads a group of storm troopers to investigate why one of their outposts hasn't responded only to discover the xenomorphs have taken over.....lol ok that's just a dream.

  14. The Old One
    I don't think there's a problem with the story in the prequels, but it's in the details of character behaviour and scripting that needed more work.
  15. Wysps
    Quote from: Corporal Hicks on Jun 22, 2018, 07:24:14 AM
    I couldn't care less about the gender of the hero but it's become too formulaic. AvP, Prometheus and Covenant - the primarily female character makes it to the end. And then it's telegraphed all over the marketing which particular character that is going to be.

    I'd hope in future they don't make it so obvious. Increase the number of female characters so it's not so hard to pick out the 1 women out of the 4 who is receiving the most attention in marketing or in the run-up. And most importantly make all the characters - regardless of gender - interesting.

    Or do what they did with Alien to start with - write them unisex. And stick it through to casting, pick whoever is the best.

    Also, split focus between the stylistic/artful aspects of the film with proper characterizations of the cast.  Merely focusing on gorgeous sets, ambient music, and thematic elements aren't going to move the story.  The movie is going to stagnate if the cast doesn't have enough personality to drive the story forward.  (I personally like them having the sex picked out prior to casting.  Then their attributes can influence how that character behaves to a certain extent - idk it just makes the characters more relatable to me.)

  16. Perfect-Organism
    Ha!  It should totally be an effeminate man who gets stuck in a situation with an alien and then the film is about him manning up...  Literally, it could be about a hair stylist on a glamorous gambling space station, who  picks up his first gun with two fingers and then begins to transform...  would be hilarious...
  17. tleilaxu
    Quote from: Corporal Hicks on Jun 22, 2018, 07:24:14 AM
    I couldn't care less about the gender of the hero but it's become too formulaic. AvP, Prometheus and Covenant - the primarily female character makes it to the end. And then it's telegraphed all over the marketing which particular character that is going to be.

    I'd hope in future they don't make it so obvious. Increase the number of female characters so it's not so hard to pick out the 1 women out of the 4 who is receiving the most attention in marketing or in the run-up. And most importantly make all the characters - regardless of gender - interesting.

    Or do what they did with Alien to start with - write them unisex. And stick it through to casting, pick whoever is the best.
    Daniels is effectively dead though.
  18. Corporal Hicks
    Quote from: SiL on Jun 22, 2018, 12:50:45 PM
    That it's going to be obvious who lives has nothing to do with tropes or gender, it's just lazy writing or marketing.

    I think it has become a trope for Alien films, though. Purely because of Ripley. If it's an Alien film, it's going to have the main female character survive until the end. It's definitely bad writing and marketing in giving it away but it's still to do with gender and trope. I can pretty much assume that when I get an Alien film with a female lead, she'll make it to the end because she's the female lead.

    Quote from: SiL on Jun 22, 2018, 12:50:45 PM
    How is that any different to putting Arnie (or, more contemporary, The Rock) in literally any movie, though, honestly?

    I guess because one of the effective things about Alien was that we weren't supposed to get Ripley was going to make it to the end. Obviously we've moved on from that now but it's just become such an Alien thing that I find it detrimental.
  19. SiL
    How is that any different to putting Arnie (or, more contemporary, The Rock) in literally any movie, though, honestly?

    That it's going to be obvious who lives has nothing to do with tropes or gender, it's just lazy writing or marketing.
  20. Corporal Hicks
    I couldn't care less about the gender of the hero but it's become too formulaic. AvP, Prometheus and Covenant - the primarily female character makes it to the end. And then it's telegraphed all over the marketing which particular character that is going to be.

    I'd hope in future they don't make it so obvious. Increase the number of female characters so it's not so hard to pick out the 1 women out of the 4 who is receiving the most attention in marketing or in the run-up. And most importantly make all the characters - regardless of gender - interesting.

    Or do what they did with Alien to start with - write them unisex. And stick it through to casting, pick whoever is the best.
  21. Magegg
    Shaw was a nerdy girl that became fierce when fighting the creatures in the end. And went bitter and determined to take some sort of revenge on the Engineers.

    Anyway, I said she was kind of a little different.
  22. Huggs
    Protagonists and genders aside, the strength of the alien movies has always been a good ensemble. A proper lack of which is doing its fair share in killing these prequels. 2 or 3 good characters are driving these movies. The rest are cannon fodder, and ignorant individuals that are supposed to be smart.
  23. Wysps
    Quote from: Magegg on Jun 22, 2018, 02:51:53 AM
    These "strong female characters" unfortunately are all cut by the same scissors: they begin as sort of vulnerable yet caring and end up becoming tough at cost of pain. Ripley, Shaw, Daniels, Connor... it's just a formula over and over.

    I wouldn't even call them "strong female characters", they're never devoid of a big sense of vulnerability.

    Well, Sarah Connor is the exception; I loved how she become totally nuts in Terminator 2... then she began crying because of the trauma and all of that, but well, it was consistent, and she was much different than Ripley, who I can take as a predecessor.

    But definitely I don't another one of these so-called "strong female protagonists". I don't want another Sarah Connor, and more than all, I don't want another Ripley. Create a new kind of female protagonist. Or just give me a new kind of protagonist, regardless of gender.

    Yes, a new type of protagonist altogether that breaks the cycle of what we've been shown before.  That would be fantastic.
  24. Magegg
    These "strong female characters" unfortunately are all cut by the same scissors: they begin as sort of vulnerable yet caring and end up becoming tough at cost of pain. Ripley, Shaw, Daniels, Connor... it's just a formula over and over.

    I wouldn't even call them "strong female characters", they're never devoid of a big sense of vulnerability.

    Well, Sarah Connor is the exception; I loved how she become totally nuts in Terminator 2... then she began crying because of the trauma and all of that, but well, it was consistent, and she was much different than Ripley, who I can take as a predecessor.

    But definitely I don't another one of these so-called "strong female protagonists". I don't want another Sarah Connor, and more than all, I don't want another Ripley. Create a new kind of female protagonist. Or just give me a new kind of protagonist, regardless of gender.
  25. SM
    QuoteHicks, I can't see why you can be tired of Ripley.  Her character hasn't been in action since 1997, a full 20 years ago.

    Quite.

    QuoteDaniels, not so much, but damned if I can figure out why it struck me that way. Her character just felt bland for some reason.

    She's a protagonist without an arc.  We get she's tough at the start and she's tough at the end.  Any changes in her character were due to Jacob's death and were effectively dealt with before they got to Planet 4.
  26. Wysps
    Quote from: Huggs on Jun 22, 2018, 02:25:59 AM
    Quote from: Magegg on Jun 22, 2018, 02:17:28 AM
    Quote from: Wysps on Jun 22, 2018, 02:04:32 AMI don't ever feel that it's too one-sided, or that strong males are ever under-represented. And I'm a dude.
    I don't care about the gender. I just want another kind of lead hero, or heroine, idk. Elizabeth Shaw was kind of a refreshing change, but she maybe ended up wrapped in the same clichés as her predecessors. And Daniels was a complete retrogression, really generic.

    Shaw was indeed a step in the right direction. Daniels, not so much, but damned if I can figure out why it struck me that way. Her character just felt bland for some reason.



    Quote from: Wysps on Jun 22, 2018, 02:19:19 AM
    (By the way, that's Huggs quote, not mine!)

    Oh, just admit it. Admit you said it.  :D

    How can I take credit for such cultivating truths?? ;D

    Quote from: Perfect-Organism on Jun 22, 2018, 02:40:52 AM
    Hicks, I can't see why you can be tired of Ripley.  Her character hasn't been in action since 1997, a full 20 years ago.

    I presume you're talking about the repetition of the character, via Daniels and Shaw, and on this level only, I agree.  If a new Aliens film is to be made with the idea of a strong female lead, it should be Ripley or nothing.  I am tired of seeing second rate Ripley knockoffs.  The character, be it man or woman just has to work well for the story. 

    I'm with you there.  That's what I was saying - I'd like to see a character-driven protagonist over a half-assed copy of a character that has been recycled countless times, be they male or female.  Said it in a much more eloquent way, but I guess that's the message I was going for.
  27. Perfect-Organism
    Hicks, I can't see why you can be tired of Ripley.  Her character hasn't been in action since 1997, a full 20 years ago.

    I presume you're talking about the repetition of the character, via Daniels and Shaw, and on this level only, I agree.  If a new Aliens film is to be made with the idea of a strong female lead, it should be Ripley or nothing.  I am tired of seeing second rate Ripley knockoffs.  The character, be it man or woman just has to work well for the story. 
  28. Huggs
    Quote from: Magegg on Jun 22, 2018, 02:17:28 AM
    Quote from: Wysps on Jun 22, 2018, 02:04:32 AMI don't ever feel that it's too one-sided, or that strong males are ever under-represented. And I'm a dude.
    I don't care about the gender. I just want another kind of lead hero, or heroine, idk. Elizabeth Shaw was kind of a refreshing change, but she maybe ended up wrapped in the same clichés as her predecessors. And Daniels was a complete retrogression, really generic.

    Shaw was indeed a step in the right direction. Daniels, not so much, but damned if I can figure out why it struck me that way. Her character just felt bland for some reason.



    Quote from: Wysps on Jun 22, 2018, 02:19:19 AM
    (By the way, that's Huggs quote, not mine!)

    Oh, just admit it. Admit you said it.  :D
  29. Wysps
    Quote from: The Old One on Jun 22, 2018, 02:14:19 AM
    Ahem.

    Blue Marsalis

    I must admit...I have not read Alien: The Cold Forge :-X This obviously needs to be rectified.

    Quote from: Magegg on Jun 22, 2018, 02:17:28 AM
    Quote from: Wysps on Jun 22, 2018, 02:04:32 AMI don't ever feel that it's too one-sided, or that strong males are ever under-represented. And I'm a dude.
    I don't care about the gender. I just want another kind of lead hero, or heroine, idk. Elizabeth Shaw was kind of a refreshing change, but she maybe ended up wrapped in the same clichés as her predecessors. And Daniels was a complete retrogression, really generic.

    Oh I agree - I even though I'm not stuck on a particular gender either, I wouldn't mind seeing a male protagonist take the helm at this point.  (By the way, that's Huggs quote, not mine!)
  30. Magegg
    Quote from: Wysps on Jun 22, 2018, 02:04:32 AMI don't ever feel that it's too one-sided, or that strong males are ever under-represented. And I'm a dude.
    I don't care about the gender. I just want another kind of lead hero, or heroine, idk. Elizabeth Shaw was kind of a refreshing change, but she maybe ended up wrapped in the same clichés as her predecessors. And Daniels was a complete retrogression, really generic.
  31. Wysps
    Quote from: Huggs on Jun 21, 2018, 09:56:53 PM
    Quote from: Magegg on Jun 21, 2018, 09:24:53 PM
    I'm actually bored about this "strong female protagonists"... it's a staple in the Alien and Terminator franchises, but I've found it way too repetitive over the time. I don't know, I would like to have someone completely different in the role.

    Parker, Hicks, Dillon. Not to mention may of the side characters. The alien movies may focus primarily on strong female leads, but they've usually been surrounded by some really tough male characters. I don't ever feel that it's too one-sided, or that strong males are ever under-represented. And I'm a dude. I think the problem stems from the fact that nowadays you're just unlikely to get a female lead with the strength and sheer "badassness" of Ripley or the original Sarah Connor.

    Do we really need another Ellen Ripley or Sarah Connor though?  A lot of Scifi/Horrors go for the Ripley/Connor archtype, which I tend to find unconvincing - they're trying so hard to emulate those characters, instead of possessing the virtues and values that'll propel the story forward on their own.  They end up being devoid of personality. Can't we just have a strong female protagonist, or hell, just a female protagonist with the amount of "character" needed to move the story?  As much as I like Ripley, I do need a break from her.
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