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Author Topic: Prometheus vehicles exposed  (Read 46797 times)

ThisBethesdaSea
Sep 01, 2011, 12:42:24 AM
Reply #120 on: Sep 01, 2011, 12:42:24 AM
Using whether or not a film is quotable as a thermometer for what's good and what isn't is sorta lame. Ridley doesn't make the kinds of films Cambo makes. They're two different directors entirely. One makes thoughtful serious films, the other, summer block busters that are fun to remember, and make a mark, but largely dont enter the psyche on any sort of grand level the way Ridley does. They're both great at what they do without the need for comparison.

« Last Edit: Sep 01, 2011, 04:19:56 AM by ThisBethesdaSea »

Valaquen
Sep 01, 2011, 12:43:37 AM
Reply #121 on: Sep 01, 2011, 12:43:37 AM
Say what you want, man. The Terminator got in my psyche more than Gladiator did :P [and I lurve Glad!]


Gash
Sep 01, 2011, 12:50:37 AM
Reply #122 on: Sep 01, 2011, 12:50:37 AM
So, can anyone with 3D skills recreate that vehicle via the two available views of it?


Xenomrph
Sep 01, 2011, 02:29:13 AM
Reply #123 on: Sep 01, 2011, 02:29:13 AM
Quote
[Cameron's films] largely dont enter the psyche on any sort of grand level the way Ridley does.
I don't know how anyone can say this with a straight face.

Also "Cambo" is about the most retarded nickname this side of "Riddles". :P


josh_axey
Sep 01, 2011, 02:33:44 AM
Reply #124 on: Sep 01, 2011, 02:33:44 AM
So how 'bout them vehicles....  :laugh:


NUB DESTROYER
Sep 01, 2011, 02:39:50 AM
Reply #125 on: Sep 01, 2011, 02:39:50 AM
Ridley is a prolific filmmaker. He can make films that can enter your psyche. But there are a lot of movies of his that are intended to be simple popcorn movies and really are just that. Keyword here is prolific.

Cameron -- not as prolific. He invest his time more on creating the perfect blockbuster. Of course they don't come out perfect, but Cameron has a better success rate than Ridley in terms of general audience acceptance.


Personally, I prefer Ridley's visual style more than Cameron. But if I was a betting man, I would choose Cameron to make better movies in the long run.



m138jewski
Sep 01, 2011, 03:11:56 AM
Reply #127 on: Sep 01, 2011, 03:11:56 AM
I was thrown off by the title of this thread. I though it was about those new pictures, not Cameron vs Scott


ThisBethesdaSea
Sep 01, 2011, 04:21:38 AM
Reply #128 on: Sep 01, 2011, 04:21:38 AM
I'll take a film that's not as widely loved by larger audiences then then the popular blockbuster fare we see every year.


Gash
Sep 01, 2011, 06:05:03 AM
Reply #129 on: Sep 01, 2011, 06:05:03 AM
^ this. Enough of Ridley's films have had a proven longevity, and an original created look that belies the time in which they were made. People seem to forget that before A L I E N and Blade Runner sci fi didn't really look like that.

Culturally the impact of his design decisions has had an enormous impact on the world over the last 30 years. Everything from the obvious influence of 'C' deck design being the default for sci-fi, right down to minutiae like the fashion for combat jeans, stems from A L I E N  in 79. He's far more influential than any 'quotable' film maker. Not every film he's ever made is a classic sure enough but I think he's probably the most important director around for lots of reasons that are more significant than his hit and miss rate.

« Last Edit: Sep 01, 2011, 06:07:10 AM by Gash »

Xenomrph
Sep 01, 2011, 07:34:54 AM
Reply #130 on: Sep 01, 2011, 07:34:54 AM
Quote
He's far more influential than any 'quotable' film maker.
That's another statement I can't believe people would actually say with a straight face. If you honestly think Ridley Scott is more influential to filmmaking and society/pop-culture as a whole than James Cameron, whose movies invented photoshop, revolutionized CGI, revolutionized underwater filmmaking, revolutionized 3D filmmaking, and are largely regarded as the most popular action movies of all time, I don't know what to say.

Ridley Scott is known for four films - Alien, Blade Runner, Gladiator, and Black Hawk Down. As for the clothing and design thing, I suspect a lot of that "lived in" design could be traced back to Star Wars 2 years prior, not 'Alien'.

Quote
I think he's probably the most important director around
I don't see how anyone could honestly think this, especially since his last several movies weren't very good and there's plenty of other directors who are consistently better, and I'm not even talking "turn your brain off" popcorn movies. Hell, I suspect Ridley Scott would be the first one to admit it. He'd be flattered to think someone thought that of him, but I'm confident he wouldn't agree.
Danny Boyle, Chris Nolan, David Fincher, Guillermo del Toro, Neil Blomkamp, Clint Eastwood, Terry Gilliam, I'd put any of those higher than Ridley Scott if only because Scott's last several movies weren't very good and the last visually iconic, groundbreaking movie he did was Blade Runner, 30 years ago.

I mean, don't get me wrong. I like Ridley Scott when he does things well. Gladiator is one of my favorite movies. I just re-watched 'Alien' on bluray not 2 days ago and I still like it quite a bit. I'm borrowing 'Blade Runner' from a friend so I can re-watch it because I don't have my DVD handy. But some of these claims I'm seeing in this thread are some hardcore cognitive dissonance and hero-worship.

« Last Edit: Sep 01, 2011, 07:42:46 AM by Xenomrph »


SiL
Sep 01, 2011, 11:08:35 AM
Reply #132 on: Sep 01, 2011, 11:08:35 AM
That's being rather generous. Star Wars was the first major sci-fi to have rusty conduit-filled corridors on its interstellar spaceships.


Valaquen
Sep 01, 2011, 11:13:10 AM
Reply #133 on: Sep 01, 2011, 11:13:10 AM
That's being rather generous. Star Wars was the first major sci-fi to have rusty conduit-filled corridors on its interstellar spaceships.
Probably, but Dark Star was never major. Cobb worked on DS and Alien, so I see the progression going from there. Lucas saw DS too, as did Roger Christian, who saw it and called it 'amazing.' Though he was also influenced on Star Wars by Alphaville and Solaris.


ThisBethesdaSea
Sep 01, 2011, 12:07:48 PM
Reply #134 on: Sep 01, 2011, 12:07:48 PM
Xenomorph....I appreciate your enthusiasm, but you're missing the larger point. First of all, I don't like this 'better than' business. Both gentleman have created some pretty astounding work respectively. For me, as a science fiction lover, and some one who will even watch a couple of the Species films just to see what's going, and as a person who loves the original Star Wars trilogy, David Lynch's Dune and a few others....NOT ONE of the films by Lucas, Cameron, Lynch, Kubrick resonate in my consciousness the way A L I E N and BladeRunner have. There's a quality about Scotts films that transcends costume design and technological feats. His sole science fiction films created this isolated distance, this tangible spacial dissonance between the film and the viewer. The way Deckard looked out on to the city in BladeRunner capturing the essence of full yet lonely big city living, the way Brett embodied blue collar qualities....I can't shake how it's effected the way I see everything when it comes to science fiction. I can't say that for Cameron, Lucas, Lynch, Soderbergh, (possibly Spielberg).

More soon.


 

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