Predator 2 (Muilti-Platforms)

Predator 2 (Amiga, Amstrad CPC, Atari ST, Commodore 64, DOS, ZX Spectrum)

 Predator 2 (Muilti-Platforms)

Predator 2

Platform: Amiga, Amstrad CPC, Atari ST, Commodore 64, DOS, ZX Spectrum
Release Date: 1990
Genre: Rail Shooter
Publisher: Image Works
Developer: Oxford Mobius (DOS), Arc Developments

The first game based on Predator 2 was a rail-shooter released in 1990 for various platforms including Amiga and Commodore 64. The second game, a third-person shooter, based on the film was released in 1992 for the Genesis/Mega Drive and then a side-scroller shooter was later released for the Master System and Game Gear.

Description

Los Angeles Lieutenant Mike Harrigan is used to dealing with a drug war between Spanish and Jamaican drug gangs, but how he’s caught up in the city’s worst nightmare! The fearsome Predator species of alien has arrived, out to wreak serious destruction. It is your job to stop it.

The game is a rails shooter with the the viewpoint is from behind Harrigan, while the game scrolls on as you clear each section. Mouse control is offered on 16-bit versions. Your armour must be kept functional by collecting top-ups, and there are weapon power-ups such as machine guns and rocket launchers to be had. You can’t go in all-guns-blazing however, as killing a single innocent causes Harrigan to lose his job.

Covers

DOS (UK Cover)
DOS (US Cover)
Amiga (UK Cover)
Amiga (US Cover)

Screenshots

Magazine Articles

Commodore Format (May 1991)
Amiga Power (June 1991)

 

Gameplay Footage

Reception

Commodore Format gave Predator 2 80% saying the sound effects and various levels were good. Amiga Power was more critical with 53% saying “Quite simply a very average blaster in the Operation Wolf tradition. Predator 2 lacks suitable emotional hooks to make you want to play and is insufficiently varied to keep you going.”

Predator 2 (Sega Genesis)

 Predator 2 (Muilti-Platforms)

Predator 2

Platform: Sega Genesis
Release Date: 1992
Genre: Action
Publisher: Acclaim Entertainment
Developer: Teeny Weeny Games

The first game based on Predator 2 was a rail-shooter released in 1990 for various platforms including Amiga and Commodore 64. The second game, a third-person shooter, based on the film was released in 1992 for the Genesis/Mega Drive and then a side-scroller shooter was later released for the Master System and Game Gear. Teeny Weeny Games developed both games for the Genesis and Master System but they were very different games.

Description

Players play as Lt. Mike Harrigan as he tracks the Predator through seven levels based on the film. Harrigan’s primary concerns are the hostages held around the levels, and the many gang members out for blood. He also has to contend with the Predator, both as a boss at the end of each level, and as a time limit – if the player takes too long to rescue a hostage, the Predator will blast the hostage with his laser.

The game is played in a third-person isometric view, with great swarms of easily-killed bad guys, who appear through one-way doors scattered throughout the level. Weapons not only include machine guns and shotguns, but also a few highly-advanced Predator weapons the player can pick up and use. Each defeated gang member drops drugs that can be picked up and automatically sent off to the “drug squad” for points. No sounds or music from the film get used, but stills scenes from the film do introduce the levels.

In the final level, Harrigan arrives at the Predator’s ship where he battles the Predator’s clanmates and finally both the Predator and the Elder. The game ends in a similar way as the movie: Harrigan is presented an old flintlock pistol by the Predator’s clanmates, then leaves the ship as it departs from Earth.

Covers

Genesis (US Cover)
Mega Drive (UK Cover)

Screenshots

Magazine Articles

Sega Power (October 1992)
Sega Power (December 1992)

Gameplay Footage

Reception

Sega Power was quite negative in their review scoring Predator 2 36% criticising the gameplay, animation and graphics. Summing up, they said “Flying Edge have failed to fully exploit the enormous potential of the Predator and his anti-social habits. Plenty of good ideas, but a botched job all round. Awful!”

Predator 2 (Master System, GameGear)

 Predator 2 (Muilti-Platforms)

Predator 2

Platform: Sega Master System, Sega Game Gear
Release Date: 1992
Genre: Side-Scrolling Shooter
Publisher: Acclaim Entertainment
Developer: Teeny Weeny Games

The first game based on Predator 2 was a rail-shooter released in 1990 for various platforms including Amiga and Commodore 64. The second game, a third-person shooter, based on the film was released in 1992 for the Genesis/Mega Drive and then a side-scroller shooter was later released for the Master System and Game Gear. Teeny Weeny Games developed both games for the Genesis and Master System but they were very different games.

Description

The player controls Lt. Mike Harrigan in a side scrolling view (instead of an isometric one) through 7 levels.

Harrigan has to fight drug dealers and must rescue a certain number of hostages at each level. The Predator’s three-dotted laser aim can be troublesome to avoid, which can kill either the hostages or Mike himself. Gang members killed drop drugs which can be picked up for points (and sent to the drugs squad). At the end of each level a boss must be defeated.

Mike can move and shoot in all 8 directions, but can only stop and shoot up, down, left and right. Besides his pistol, Mike can also collect new weapons such as grenades, shotguns, machine-guns and rifles. Body armor can be collected for health and med kits for extra lives.

Covers

SMS (UK Cover)
Game Gear (UK Cover)
Game Gear (US Cover)

Screenshots

Magazine Articles

Unknown Magazine (Game Gear Review)
Sega Power (May 1993)

Gameplay Footage

Reception

After scoring the Genesis version 36%, Sega Power reviewed the Master System version the following year and gave it 58%. They liked the difficulty and password system as well as the soundtrack. They said “A regular child of Averagesville, Predator 2 is so unspectacular it hurts. Fun for a short while – it’s definitely no disgrace – but not really anything to fax home about.”

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Comments: 2
  1. The Operation Wolf style approach on the 8/16 bit home micros was chosen as it was the easiest to implement across all the formats and the isometric /Smash TV approach deemed more suitable for the console market.

    Home micro version’s Producer in hindsight wishes he had instead gone with his preferred approach..a split screen chase and maze affair,as he openly admits arcadey shoot-em-games really weren’t his thing.


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