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Author Topic: Odd News & General Knowledge Thread  (Read 1728 times)


Baron Von Marlon
Oct 16, 2019, 09:05:59 PM
Reply #16 on: Oct 16, 2019, 09:05:59 PM
Q
The first registered case of illegal drug trafficking from Mexico to the USA was in 1914 or 1915.
Meaning it's been going on for over 100 years.


Immortan Jonesy
Oct 18, 2019, 02:11:01 AM
Reply #17 on: Oct 18, 2019, 02:11:01 AM
Q
Quote from: Gizmodo
This has gotten out of control. I know you all read that Reuters article, the one that stated that the Paris Zoological Park had acquired a “mysterious new organism” dubbed the “blob” in reference to a horror movie. And I know you all began to panic as you read that said blob “has no mouth, no stomach, no eyes, yet it can detect food and digest it,” “has almost 720 sexes, can move without legs or wings and heals itself in two minutes if cut in half,” and (in the words of Paris Museum of Natural History director Bruno David) “has no brain but is able to learn (...) and if you merge two blobs, the one that has learned will transmit its knowledge to the other.”





Quote from: CNN
The Tasmanian tiger, a large striped carnivore, is believed to have gone extinct over 80 years ago -- but newly released Australian government documents show sightings have been reported as recently as two months ago.

Tasmania's Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment (DPIPWE) recently released a document detailing eight reported sightings of the Tasmanian tiger, or thylacine, in the last three years.




There is something, in the deepest reaches of the intergalactic space, far from of our Milky Way, which is inexorably dragging everything nearby. Yep, that include us. I am talking about a gravitational anomaly named as "The Great Attractor".

 

« Last Edit: Nov 02, 2019, 05:37:43 AM by Immortan Jonesy »

Kimarhi
Oct 23, 2019, 06:45:45 PM
Reply #18 on: Oct 23, 2019, 06:45:45 PM
Q
C4 is 1.34x more explosive than tnt.


Immortan Jonesy
Nov 02, 2019, 05:40:48 AM
Reply #19 on: Nov 02, 2019, 05:40:48 AM
Q


1. Before the UFOs, there were "Mystery airships".


Quote from: American Heritage
During November of 1896 the United States experienced its first publicized UFO flap, and it is perhaps not surprising that it should have occurred in California. After all, Erich von Däniken would have us believe that the prehistoric petroglyphs in Inyo County represent interplanetary flight; Fray Geronimo Boscana, the missionary at San Juan Capistrano, described a “two-tailed comet” overhead in 1823; and in 1883 the scientist John J. Montgomery began his heavier-than-air experiments by putting a glider into the air over the sun-browned hills of Otay Mesa, south of San Diego.

All this, though, was pretty small change compared with the arrival of “The Great Airship.”

Close Encounters Of The Earliest Kind



2. The largest-calibre rifled weapon ever used in combat is the Schwerer Gustav.
 





3. Adolf Hitler’s nephew served in the US Navy during World War II as a hospital corpsman.


Quote from: New York Times
Willy Hitler was born in 1911 in Liverpool, and in his early years occasionally sought to take advantage of his last name, in England, Germany and then America, where he moved in 1939. After World War II, though, he decided to change the name and moved from New York City out to Patchogue on Long Island. He raised four sons - Alexander, Louis, Howard and Brian - before he died in 1987 at age 76.

3 quiet brothers, relatives of Hitler



4. There is an alleged lost and unfinished 1997 PlayStation video game called "Petscop".

The thing suddenly appeared on a YouTube channel a couple of years ago. Overall, it looks like a crude Pokemon style game, where the player must catch weird creatures by solving puzzles. However, the game is supposed to have a chilling subtext, making references to real-life murders. In particular:


The Murder of Candace Newmaker

Quote from: Kotaku
Throughout the game, there are multiple references to “rebirthing,” and “Newmaker.” Players treating Petscop as an ARG have discovered that these are references to Candance Newmaker, a real person. Newmaker was adopted at five, but she was apparently a troubled child who allegedly killed pets. Seeking help for their rocky relationship, Newmaker’s guardians tried something called “Attachment Therapy,” which is supposed to help kids connect with their parents. The goal is to make a kid revert back to an infant’s state of mind, which supposedly makes it easier for parents to control their children. None of this stuff is backed by actual science, however, which might explain why things went horribly for Newmaker.




5. Guinea pig ice cream is a thing in Ecuador.







6. If you find the Voynich manuscript visually interesting, then the utterly bizarre Codex Seraphinianus is for you.

Quote from: Wired
A couple having sex metamorphoses into a crocodile. Fish eyes from some weird creature float on the surface of the sea, staring at me. A man is riding his own coffin. Text accompanies these surreal images, handwritten, seemingly ancient but totally unintelligible. I’ve just stepped into the bizarre universe of Codex Seraphinianus, the weirdest encyclopedia in the world.







Look Inside the Extremely Rare Codex Seraphinianus, the Weirdest Encyclopedia Ever






Baron Von Marlon
Nov 02, 2019, 07:57:12 PM
Reply #22 on: Nov 02, 2019, 07:57:12 PM
Q
The first registered case of illegal drug trafficking from Mexico to the USA was in 1914 or 1915.
Meaning it's been going on for over 100 years.

Based Mexicans helping Americans party for over a century.

They were Chinese-Mexicans.
Chinese immigrants or their descendants (can't remember exactly) introduced the opium poppy, started growing and exporting.



Immortan Jonesy
Nov 03, 2019, 05:37:17 AM
Reply #24 on: Nov 03, 2019, 05:37:17 AM
Q
Spider webs created by spiders exposed to different drugs. The experiment was conducted by the German pharmacologist Peter Witt in 1948.



Quote from: Vice
"Chemistry wasn't nearly as advanced as it is now," said Linda Rayor, an entomologist at Cornell University who studies spider behavior. "Witt was into the idea that you could feed the blood of people on various drugs to spiders, and those spiders would build very drug-specific webs."

In addition to blood, Witt also gave spiders the urine of people with schizophrenia. There was a popular idea going around that schizophrenics had a hallucinogenic compound flowing through their veins.

Have Scientists Learned Anything from Giving Drugs to Spiders?



Baron Von Marlon
Jan 12, 2020, 07:18:27 AM
Reply #26 on: Jan 12, 2020, 07:18:27 AM
Q
Mexico news:

The largest mineable lithium deposit has been discovered in Mexico.
This will attract industry, commerce and the cartels. Which will lead to even more conflict.
Some think the escalation could be the tipping point and eventually will lead to an American intervention.

Recent footage has shown the Mexican army standing down as their families were held hostage (or they were outnumbered and outgunned, can't remember) by the Sinaloa Cartel after the arrest of El Chapo's son, who then got released.
Making it clear the situation over there is getting more and more out of hand.


Immortan Jonesy
Jan 18, 2020, 04:30:09 AM
Reply #27 on: Jan 18, 2020, 04:30:09 AM
Q
Pelican spiders (Archaeidae), the only spiders with "neck" in the world  :laugh:









They live here  8)



However, not everything is joy, since I heard that a population of these spiders is being affected by the fires in Australia.  :'(
 


Baron Von Marlon
Jan 18, 2020, 06:55:25 PM
Reply #28 on: Jan 18, 2020, 06:55:25 PM
Q
Pelican spiders (Archaeidae), the only spiders with "neck" in the world  :laugh:

Funky fellas.



Is bio-mech born? Certainly something suitable for the new Alien flick  :laugh:

Scientists use stem cells from frogs to build first living robots

“These are entirely new lifeforms. They have never before existed on Earth,” said Michael Levin, the director of the Allen Discovery Center at Tufts University in Medford, Massachusetts. “They are living, programmable organisms.”

https://www.theguardian.com/science/2020/jan/13/scientists-use-stem-cells-from-frogs-to-build-first-living-robots


Immortan Jonesy
Jan 20, 2020, 05:49:38 AM
Reply #29 on: Jan 20, 2020, 05:49:38 AM
Q
Quote from: The Guardian
A Kansas man has asked an Iowa judge to let him engage in a sword fight with his ex-wife and her attorney in a trial by combat that will settle their ongoing legal dispute.

https://twitter.com/guardian/status/1217175319242780674

Quote from: Popular Mechanics
One of the truly remarkable characteristics of the giant squid is its brain, which is rather complex and strangely shaped. Smithsonian describes its brain as "shaped like a donut." And weirdly enough, its esophagus actually runs through that hole.

But here's the catch: While the brain is colossally complicated, it's actually pretty small as a share of the giant squid's full body mass. While a giant squid can weigh up to one ton, based on the carcasses that have washed ashore and the limited video evidence we've seen of the them, their brain only weighs about 100 grams, which is just over one-fifth of a pound. Still, that's the largest invertebrate brain on record.

https://twitter.com/PopMech/status/1217959760953315334



Is bio-mech born? Certainly something suitable for the new Alien flick  :laugh:

Scientists use stem cells from frogs to build first living robots

“These are entirely new lifeforms. They have never before existed on Earth,” said Michael Levin, the director of the Allen Discovery Center at Tufts University in Medford, Massachusetts. “They are living, programmable organisms.”

https://www.theguardian.com/science/2020/jan/13/scientists-use-stem-cells-from-frogs-to-build-first-living-robots

That was a great read. Thanks!


 

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