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Author Topic: Questions for Wayne Haag (VFX Concept Artist) - Pr...  (Read 4550 times)

BonesawT101
Oct 11, 2016, 11:01:04 PM
Reply #15 on: Oct 11, 2016, 11:01:04 PM
I studied fine and applied art myself, and I love the research phase before a project. I am interested to know who and what Wayne researched before diving into creating his work on Covenant. What other works influenced his design and concepts for the film the most and finally after receiving his brief so to speak at first from Ridley, what did Wayne bring to the table, idea and design wise. Hope these make sense, I've been working late and I'm exhausted  :o

« Last Edit: Oct 11, 2016, 11:07:54 PM by BonesawT101 »

Enoch
Oct 11, 2016, 11:09:26 PM
Reply #16 on: Oct 11, 2016, 11:09:26 PM
Good question! It seems you are not completely exhausted   :laugh: ;)


BonesawT101
Oct 11, 2016, 11:12:04 PM
Reply #17 on: Oct 11, 2016, 11:12:04 PM
 :D haha thanks man  8)


CainsSon
Oct 12, 2016, 03:21:20 AM
Reply #18 on: Oct 12, 2016, 03:21:20 AM
Next week I'm going to be chatting to Alien: Covenant vfx concept artist Wayne Haag. I'm writing up some questions now but I wanted to ensure you all had the chance to submit any questions. Obviously Wayne wont be getting into any specifics about the film but if you have any non-spoilery questions you'd like to ask, now is the chance!

Building on BONESAW's QUESTION -

If you get a chance, ask him what materials Ridley Scott might have given the visual artists working on the film to use as a visual reference! Often times there will be boards worth of images, artwork, possibly insects for the alien stuff,... For instance the Goblin Shark was used for the Deacon in Prometheus. Other times the director might ask people to watch entire films for their tone or atmosphere, and etc.

« Last Edit: Oct 12, 2016, 08:06:11 PM by CainsSon »

Protozoid
Oct 12, 2016, 04:18:46 AM
Reply #19 on: Oct 12, 2016, 04:18:46 AM
Next week I'm going to be chatting to Alien: Covenant vfx concept artist Wayne Haag. I'm writing up some questions now but I wanted to ensure you all had the chance to submit any questions. Obviously Wayne wont be getting into any specifics about the film but if you have any non-spoilery questions you'd like to ask, now is the chance!
Could you ask him if working on Covenant changed how he perceives Prometheus? Did he have an "aha!" moment where Prometheus suddenly made a lot more sense?

Also, if Covenant's design had a unifying theme, and he could describe it in one word, what would it be?

Thanks, guys!


Necronomicon II
Oct 12, 2016, 07:23:15 AM
Reply #20 on: Oct 12, 2016, 07:23:15 AM
Qs for Wayne:

Q1: Hi Wayne! You recently tweeted about how beautifully grotesque the sets and set-pieces were, would you say Covenant expands on the visual design concepts and aesthetic of the original Alien? Has Ridley surpassed himself in this respect?

Q2: Did any of your artistic creations and contributions truly wow Ridley and exceed his expectations?


Corporal Hicks
Oct 12, 2016, 07:44:14 AM
Reply #21 on: Oct 12, 2016, 07:44:14 AM
Wayne confirmed that he didnt do any matte paintings for Covenant!

Yes, thank you professor. Backings are something else altogether.

Comeon 8th, no need for that passive aggressive.

Some great questions! Some I've already got, others I'm including at the end for "questions from the community" but keep them coming!


PsyKore
Oct 12, 2016, 09:55:54 AM
Reply #22 on: Oct 12, 2016, 09:55:54 AM
Is there generally a more prominent Giger influence/inspiration with regards to designs and aesthetics for this movie?


Enoch
Oct 12, 2016, 11:14:23 AM
Reply #23 on: Oct 12, 2016, 11:14:23 AM

Comeon 8th, no need for that passive aggressive.


I didn't take that as a negative comment. As people say, it takes all sorts... and
Eight is a bit stern and cynical but he is right, I am a professor ;D
New type of professor... professor of kindness and patience! ;) :D

He ll explain me everything about matte and backing differences ;D

P.S. Sorry for this off topic post!

« Last Edit: Oct 12, 2016, 11:20:06 AM by Enoch »

motherfather
Oct 12, 2016, 12:01:37 PM
Reply #24 on: Oct 12, 2016, 12:01:37 PM
How is a sense of scale (vastness vs cramped conditions) handled and reflected?

a - in relation to living organisms and their surroundings.

b- in relation to worlds, and open spaces within those worlds

(yes, I am fishing for info that may give hints about how suffocating and suspenseful situations may be, whether the mega giant jockeys are around, those huge tree trunks, and whether xenos are same, larger or smaller etc... )

« Last Edit: Oct 12, 2016, 12:10:01 PM by motherfather »

Ephemer Nine
Oct 12, 2016, 03:52:40 PM
Reply #25 on: Oct 12, 2016, 03:52:40 PM
What do you think is the extent of H. R. Goger's influence in the dimension of science-fiction and on a personal level?


The Eighth Passenger
Oct 12, 2016, 04:09:48 PM
Reply #26 on: Oct 12, 2016, 04:09:48 PM
Eight is a bit stern and cynical but he is right, I am a professor ;D

 :laugh: I know, I know, I always were an asshole. But the Corporal can sometimes be such a nanny.  :P

Quote
He ll explain me everything about matte and backing differences

Matte paintings are created during post-production and composited into the film afterwards. Nowadays they tend to be full 3d virtual environments rather than just flat 2d images as was the case in the past. Usually where you see a greenscreen, a matte painting will later take it's place.

Backings are very large prints that are placed or hung on the set during actual filming. So for example, instead of a greenscreen behind a window you now have a very large canvas print of the exterior environment. Saves the trouble of later having to composite it in and gives the actors a more believable environment to work in than those rather unimaginative greenscreens. It does have it's limits however since you can't animate it or anything fancy like that.

The reason I asked Wayne about it is because he mentioned working on some image files with really crazy high resolutions and file sizes. Concept paintings and even matte paintings generally don't need to be that big unless you are going to make really huge prints out of them.


Enoch
Oct 12, 2016, 06:11:38 PM
Reply #27 on: Oct 12, 2016, 06:11:38 PM

:laugh: I know, I know, I always were an asshole. But the Corporal can sometimes be such a nanny.  :P

Quote
He ll explain me everything about matte and backing differences

Matte paintings are created during post-production and composited into the film afterwards. Nowadays they tend to be full 3d virtual environments rather than just flat 2d images as was the case in the past. Usually where you see a greenscreen, a matte painting will later take it's place.

Backings are very large prints that are placed or hung on the set during actual filming. So for example, instead of a greenscreen behind a window you now have a very large canvas print of the exterior environment. Saves the trouble of later having to composite it in and gives the actors a more believable environment to work in than those rather unimaginative greenscreens. It does have it's limits however since you can't animate it or anything fancy like that.

The reason I asked Wayne about it is because he mentioned working on some image files with really crazy high resolutions and file sizes. Concept paintings and even matte paintings generally don't need to be that big unless you are going to make really huge prints out of them.

I knew you would be kind to explain me this...
Many thanks, Eight! :) 

P.S. I wouldnt be too sure about Corporal though! ;D




T Dog
Oct 13, 2016, 05:00:45 PM
Reply #29 on: Oct 13, 2016, 05:00:45 PM
Q for Wayne:
Wayne, what art (generally speaking) was the most influential on you in your formative years which made you want to be an visual artist?: whether it be books, movies, music, visual art etc?


 

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