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Author Topic: Space News & Views  (Read 33148 times)

Corporal Hicks
Sep 06, 2016, 08:20:29 AM
Reply #30 on: Sep 06, 2016, 08:20:29 AM
I remember that, but why 90 min? power ran out? or dangerous surface?

Not sure to be honest. I'll have a gander.

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As for Europa, it's a ball of ice, but they believe an ocean exists under it? if thy start drilling? makes you wonder, but i don't see them getting on Europa anytime soon.

I'm certain there's a project in development to get to Europa. I'll see if I can find it.

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Did you watch Europa report movie?  http://gb.imdb.com/title/tt2051879/

I watched it a while back. Surprisingly good movie!


Nostromo
Sep 06, 2016, 04:04:54 PM
Reply #31 on: Sep 06, 2016, 04:04:54 PM
They landed the Huygens probe on Titan. It functioned for about 90 minutes on the surface.





http://www.nasa.gov/jpl/cassini/nasa-and-esa-celebrate-10-years-since-titan-landing

I believe they're working on a mission proposal for a Europa mission but I'm not sure about Rovers and etc. They need to be careful of contaminating any possible life and etc.

Incredible pictures! We're very lucky to see these. Usually Nasa doesn't show much.

Yes I meant to say a probe not a rover!!  I'd stopped studying Astronomy around this time, will definitely need to read into this and the Juno probe a bit more. That Cassini mission has been a huge success, it's amazing that it's still going around Saturn for all these years! (Its mission is ongoing as of 2016. It has studied the planet Saturn and its many natural satellites since arriving there in 2004).

Not only that, but it even launched that nice Huygens probe to Titan, which is the 2nd largest moon in our Solar System. By the way, Huygens is classified as a derelict lander, how sexy is that?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Huygens_(spacecraft)

Largest moons in our Star System (diameter over 1,000 km)

Moon    Planet   Mean diameter (km)
Ganymede    Jupiter   5262
Titan           Saturn      5150
Callisto    Jupiter   4821
Io              Jupiter     3643
Moon         Earth       3475
Europa       Jupiter     3122
Triton         Neptune   2707
Titania        Uranus    1578

http://www.ianridpath.com/moons.htm



« Last Edit: Sep 07, 2016, 12:51:06 AM by Nostromo »

x-M-x
Sep 06, 2016, 04:37:07 PM
Reply #32 on: Sep 06, 2016, 04:37:07 PM
it's amazing that it's still going around Saturn for all these years! (Its mission is ongoing as of 2016. It has studied the planet Saturn and its many natural satellites since arriving there in 2004).

Don't forget Voyager 1, Launched September 5, 1977 and still going. (makes you wonder what she has seen and where is she now...) - Hard to believe she is still transmitting data back to NASA.

http://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov/


They've definitely got to make a Voyager 3 someday. (with our current tech and faster speeds etc)



Nostromo
Sep 06, 2016, 07:00:33 PM
Reply #33 on: Sep 06, 2016, 07:00:33 PM
it's amazing that it's still going around Saturn for all these years! (Its mission is ongoing as of 2016. It has studied the planet Saturn and its many natural satellites since arriving there in 2004).

Don't forget Voyager 1, Launched September 5, 1977 and still going. (makes you wonder what she has seen and where is she now...) - Hard to believe she is still transmitting data back to NASA.

http://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov/


They've definitely got to make a Voyager 3 someday. (with our current tech and faster speeds etc)

Voyager 2 still going as well.. http://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov/where/

In case anyone wants to go live on Pluto, this is what it looks like in some parts:

http://www.nasa.gov/feature/pluto-s-methane-snowcaps-on-the-edge-of-darkness




« Last Edit: Sep 07, 2016, 12:52:59 AM by Nostromo »

Corporal Hicks
Sep 07, 2016, 07:15:15 AM
Reply #34 on: Sep 07, 2016, 07:15:15 AM
Don't forget Voyager 1, Launched September 5, 1977 and still going. (makes you wonder what she has seen and where is she now...) - Hard to believe she is still transmitting data back to NASA.

Most likely nothing. It'll probably be a long time before the Voyagers see anything of interest. Dedicated interstellar probes are a long way off with our current level of technology. It'd just take too long for them to get anywhere. Someday though.


x-M-x
Sep 07, 2016, 02:14:46 PM
Reply #35 on: Sep 07, 2016, 02:14:46 PM
Don't forget Voyager 1, Launched September 5, 1977 and still going. (makes you wonder what she has seen and where is she now...) - Hard to believe she is still transmitting data back to NASA.

Most likely nothing. It'll probably be a long time before the Voyagers see anything of interest. Dedicated interstellar probes are a long way off with our current level of technology. It'd just take too long for them to get anywhere. Someday though.

You're right, after reading more about it, it won't come into contact with any planet or star for another 30,000 Years... 

(i'll make sure i'll be out on that day.)


Also, i remember this pic.



Active Volcano/lava flow on the moon 'Lo'



x-M-x
Sep 09, 2016, 12:50:29 PM
Reply #37 on: Sep 09, 2016, 12:50:29 PM
That is lovely. Which probe is that from?

Think it was the Galileo spacecraft or Pioneer 11.


http://www.seeker.com/asteroid-named-for-rock-star-freddie-mercury-1998298240.html

That's a lovely tribute.  :)

Nice.


One of my favorites



SURFACE OF VENUS

« Last Edit: Sep 09, 2016, 12:54:48 PM by x-M-x »

Corporal Hicks
Sep 09, 2016, 03:17:03 PM
Reply #38 on: Sep 09, 2016, 03:17:03 PM
One of the Russian probes?


x-M-x
Sep 09, 2016, 05:59:03 PM
Reply #39 on: Sep 09, 2016, 05:59:03 PM
One of the Russian probes?


Possibly, i remember reading about it, and they said something along the lines,

*second we landed we started to experience massive failures of systems and extreme temperatures rising*

Place is a living hell, dat yellow sky lol


Nostromo
Sep 09, 2016, 06:15:33 PM
Reply #40 on: Sep 09, 2016, 06:15:33 PM
That is lovely. Which probe is that from?

http://www.seeker.com/asteroid-named-for-rock-star-freddie-mercury-1998298240.html

That's a lovely tribute.  :)

An active volcanic eruption on Jupiter's moon Io was captured in this false color image taken on February 22, 2000 by NASA's Galileo spacecraft. White and orange areas on the left side of the picture show newly erupted hot lava. The two small bright spots are sites where molten rock is exposed to the surface at the toes of lava flows. The larger orange and yellow ribbon is a cooling lava flow that is more than more than 60 kilometers (37 miles) long.

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One of the Russian probes?

Venera 13, a Soviet spacecraft, was the first lander to transmit color images from the surface of Venus. Although other landers arrived before and after it, pictures from Venera 13 tend to be more widely circulated because they are in color.

The spacecraft was designed to last about half an hour on Venus' harsh surface, but sent back data for more than two hours after its landing March 1, 1982.

Since no lander has ventured on to Venus since the 1980s, the Venera program's images of the surface stand as the best close-up record of the planet today.





Nostromo
Sep 11, 2016, 08:10:24 PM
Reply #41 on: Sep 11, 2016, 08:10:24 PM
Found this very interesting:

If Jupiter and Saturn are gas giants, could you fly straight through them?

Our friends at the W.A. Gayle Planetarium in Montgomery, Alabama, are curious to know, if Jupiter and Saturn are gas giants, could you fly straight through them?

We think of a gas as something very . . . well, airy. After all, air is the gas we all know and love. We breathe it and fly planes right through it with no trouble. So it makes sense to think that a gas planet must be like a big, airy cloud floating out in space.

But take another look at Jupiter and Saturn—or pictures of them. Notice how round they are. You will never see a cloud on Earth so nearly spherical. Why are Jupiter and Saturn so round if they are just gas? For that matter, why are any planets round?

Well, the short answer is—gravity. Gravity causes all matter to be pulled toward all other matter. Let's think about this in more detail. When the planets were first forming, the solar system was a big, swirling disk of gas and dust, with the newborn Sun at the center. Bits of dust and clouds of gas were attracted to each other because of gravity. As these bits and clouds clumped, they attracted still more matter in their neighborhood and grew larger and larger until there was no longer any stray material nearby for them to attract. The growing planets were like big solar system vacuum cleaners, sweeping up all the debris in their paths. And they became round because gravity pulls equally toward the center of large masses such as planets, so anything sticking out gets pulled back to make a ball.

The bigger a planet becomes, the heavier is the material weighing down on its center. Think of how it feels to dive under water. If you are wearing a face mask, you notice that as you dive deeper, the mask presses harder and harder on your face. Also, your ears start feeling the pressure even at 2 or 3 meters (5 or 10 feet) below the surface. The pressure you feel on your body is due to the weight of the water above you. The deeper you go, the heavier the water above you and so the greater the pressure on your body. Even on Earth's surface, each square inch of your body experiences 14.7 pounds of pressure due to the weight of theatmosphere above you. If you could dive down to the center of Earth, the pressure on your body would be about 3.5 million times as great! The center of Jupiter is more than 11 times deeper than Earth's center and the pressure may be 50 million to 100 million times that on Earth's surface!

The tremendous pressure at the center of planets causes the temperatures there to be surprisingly high. At their cores, Jupiter and Saturn are much hotter than the surface of the Sun!

Strange things happen to matter under these extraordinary temperatures and pressures. Hydrogen, along with helium, is the main ingredient of Jupiter's and Saturn's atmospheres. Deep in their atmospheres, the hydrogen turns into a liquid. Deeper still, the liquid hydrogen turns into a metal!

But what's at the very center of these planets? The material becomes stranger and stranger the deeper you go. Scientists do not understand the properties of matter under the extreme environments inside Jupiter and Saturn. Many different forces and laws of nature are at work, and the conditions inside these planets are very difficult to create in a laboratory here on Earth. But you can be sure that you wouldn't be able to fly through these bizarre materials! As we now know, the gas giants are much more than just gas.



Corporal Hicks
Sep 12, 2016, 09:57:16 AM
Reply #42 on: Sep 12, 2016, 09:57:16 AM
Venera 13, a Soviet spacecraft, was the first lander to transmit color images from the surface of Venus. Although other landers arrived before and after it, pictures from Venera 13 tend to be more widely circulated because they are in color.

The spacecraft was designed to last about half an hour on Venus' harsh surface, but sent back data for more than two hours after its landing March 1, 1982.

Since no lander has ventured on to Venus since the 1980s, the Venera program's images of the surface stand as the best close-up record of the planet today.





Wow. I've not seen those ones before. I can't say I've really read into Venus but I sure as shit am going to later.


x-M-x
Sep 12, 2016, 10:29:32 AM
Reply #43 on: Sep 12, 2016, 10:29:32 AM
Need to book a Flight there, must be nice during the summer lol.



 

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