User Information

Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length

Author Topic: Ridley Scott implies "Hard R" intention  (Read 26822 times)

redalert51
Jan 19, 2016, 03:58:43 AM
Reply #60 on: Jan 19, 2016, 03:58:43 AM
About Time , It means no restrictions to the story line and visionally ..


HuDaFuK
Jan 19, 2016, 09:02:50 AM
Reply #61 on: Jan 19, 2016, 09:02:50 AM
I kinda doubt Riddles would go too far with torture porn-style gore. It's not his style. His films typically have plenty of violence but it's never overly disgusting and often effectively shocking (that head-crush scene in Blade Runner springs to mind, or the leg surgery in Black Hawk Down).

As whiterabbit points out, R also means more than just claret.


Corporal Hicks
Jan 19, 2016, 09:42:24 AM
Reply #62 on: Jan 19, 2016, 09:42:24 AM
I kinda doubt Riddles would go too far with torture porn-style gore. It's not his style. His films typically have plenty of violence but it's never overly disgusting and often effectively shocking (that head-crush scene in Blade Runner springs to mind, or the leg surgery in Black Hawk Down).

I doubt it would be something Saw-style. Like you, I've always found his films to content scenes that are quite intense with some manner of gore. It's that kind of thing I'm hoping to see repeated here.


NickisSmart
Jan 19, 2016, 10:24:10 AM
Reply #63 on: Jan 19, 2016, 10:24:10 AM
Or the Martian. The opening scene in that made me feel a lot more uncomfortable than most R-rated horror films with much more straightforward gore.


Perfect-Organism
Jan 19, 2016, 04:21:42 PM
Reply #64 on: Jan 19, 2016, 04:21:42 PM
This really comes down to good judgment on the part of the director.  The r-rating provides the best framework for making an Alien movie because if the plot demands it, then a "disturbing" scene can be visually accommodated.  That doesn't mean it has to be a gore-fest.  I hope Ridley Scott has learned from the mistakes of other directors in the franchise and doesn't do something that is really disgusting pretending to be scary or horrific.


CainsSon
Jan 19, 2016, 07:36:04 PM
Reply #65 on: Jan 19, 2016, 07:36:04 PM
If you read up on what PG13 does to horror, according to the MPAA scenes cannot muster up intensity or dread for any sustained period. To me, this is both vague and frustrating.

I can't understand the conditions for that, unless we are talking about some horror-elements and not a horror film IE something like GREMLINS or TEMPLE OF DOOM. But dread and intensity are hallmarks of good horror.


OpenMaw
Jan 19, 2016, 09:40:15 PM
Reply #66 on: Jan 19, 2016, 09:40:15 PM
If you read up on what PG13 does to horror, according to the MPAA scenes cannot muster up intensity or dread for any sustained period. To me, this is both vague and frustrating.

I can't understand the conditions for that, unless we are talking about some horror-elements and not a horror film IE something like GREMLINS or TEMPLE OF DOOM. But dread and intensity are hallmarks of good horror.

A good example would be the scene in The Fly where Seth Brundle is working with the computer to figure out what has happened, and it is revealed that his DNA was recombined with The Fly. The horror/dread of that scene carries on throughout the scenes that follow. Something like that would probably be deemed "too intense" for the PG-13 audience.

Basically, it neuters horror. Modern, general audience, horror is basically limited to jump scares, and quick shock moments.


itshouldneverhavebeenabug
Jan 19, 2016, 10:09:49 PM
Reply #67 on: Jan 19, 2016, 10:09:49 PM
Look, I’ll take it as a very positive step in the right direction that this is being laid down pre-production. So now the head is screwed on, no pun intended, let's make this a career defining work Sir Ridley! What I can’t understand about the statement is that he’s a master film maker, so why is he hinging the notion of a good horror flick around a gore scene. Horror is the genre, terror is what it creates. Hitchcock was a master of terror, but I can’t imagine him talking about films like the Psycho or Birds in terms of a stand-out gore scene to create the terror you feel when you watch them, even the shower scene (movie history) is terrifying more in what you're left to imagine is happening but not seeing rather than its bloody gore.  In abstract i feel that there is a lot in common with the feelings you go through living out the movies through the great cast in both of these films with Alien I would liken to Psycho or the Birds (Aliens). Maybe Ridley doesn’t want to go the extra mile and make great art … I’m not sure if he’s just going to be happy with good enough, but I expect more from him given his oeuvre. But overall, very happy that he's laying down this marker to the suits about the sort of artist freedom he wants.

I remember in the blue ray of Prometheus Sir Ridley talked about playing a joke on Kate Dickie when she’s checking out the body of Milburn, i.e., she’s not told that the snake thing will jump out. I bet on a cold filming day when she’s worrying about nailing her lines, being in the presence of a director megastar then this snake thing suddenly jumps out she got a real shock. It makes me think why didn’t Sir Ridley inject this sort of fun playfulness into Prometheus itself: the way a cat terrorises a mouse. Maybe he should take that creativity with him into how to scare us and forget about some gore scene that might look better in a b movie.


NickisSmart
Jan 20, 2016, 08:55:26 AM
Reply #68 on: Jan 20, 2016, 08:55:26 AM
If you read up on what PG13 does to horror, according to the MPAA scenes cannot muster up intensity or dread for any sustained period. To me, this is both vague and frustrating.

I can't understand the conditions for that, unless we are talking about some horror-elements and not a horror film IE something like GREMLINS or TEMPLE OF DOOM. But dread and intensity are hallmarks of good horror.

A good example would be the scene in The Fly where Seth Brundle is working with the computer to figure out what has happened, and it is revealed that his DNA was recombined with The Fly. The horror/dread of that scene carries on throughout the scenes that follow. Something like that would probably be deemed "too intense" for the PG-13 audience.

Basically, it neuters horror. Modern, general audience, horror is basically limited to jump scares, and quick shock moments.

Indeed. Effective horror requires certain scenes to unfold slowly without cheap jump scares thrown in merely for the sake of it.


The Eighth Passenger
Feb 04, 2016, 02:47:50 PM
Reply #69 on: Feb 04, 2016, 02:47:50 PM
Sounds like he's also been doing location scouting on New Zealand's South Isle for Alien: Covenant?

News Hub New Zealand has also picked-up on this possibility:

http://www.newshub.co.nz/entertainment/could-ridley-scott-bring-alien-to-nz-2016020415#axzz3zAIpJIo1

Fjordland National park on the South Island:



T Dog
Feb 04, 2016, 02:59:24 PM
Reply #70 on: Feb 04, 2016, 02:59:24 PM
Sounds like he's also been doing location scouting on New Zealand's South Isle for Alien: Covenant?

News Hub New Zealand has also picked-up on this possibility:

http://www.newshub.co.nz/entertainment/could-ridley-scott-bring-alien-to-nz-2016020415#axzz3zAIpJIo1

Fjordland National park on the South Island:



Oh I went to that Fjord. Amazing place!
Seems like Scott is going for a Paradise paradise that I'm guessing was poisoned by a dark Gigeresque biology.


HuDaFuK
Feb 04, 2016, 03:00:33 PM
Reply #71 on: Feb 04, 2016, 03:00:33 PM
New Zealand really is an obscenely beautiful country.



Corporal Hicks
Feb 04, 2016, 03:10:53 PM
Reply #73 on: Feb 04, 2016, 03:10:53 PM
It looks so damn idyllic. I think it'd make a beautiful paradise world.


whiterabbit
Feb 04, 2016, 10:33:05 PM
Reply #74 on: Feb 04, 2016, 10:33:05 PM
Even better, New Zealand has penguins. You can't beat that. :P


 

Facebook Twitter Instagram Steam RSS Feed