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Author Topic: Neill Blomkamp's (cancelled?) Alien 5 project  (Read 97303 times)


Nazrel
Feb 18, 2015, 12:18:34 AM
Reply #601 on: Feb 18, 2015, 12:18:34 AM
I just dont want a film like avp or resurrection..


Omegamorph
Feb 18, 2015, 04:37:35 AM
Reply #602 on: Feb 18, 2015, 04:37:35 AM
Hah, what a carrot.

You've been using carrot in this context for a while. Where does that come from? :D
When I went to England some people used it as a colloquial, affectionate term for someone who's acting dumb or being a smartass.

« Last Edit: Feb 18, 2015, 04:39:29 AM by Omegazilla »

Corporal Hicks
Feb 18, 2015, 08:30:24 AM
Reply #603 on: Feb 18, 2015, 08:30:24 AM
New one to me. I tend to call people potatoes personally.


Russ
Feb 18, 2015, 09:27:40 AM
Reply #604 on: Feb 18, 2015, 09:27:40 AM
One of the reasons I enjoy the fact that Aliens basically has WY completely unawares of what went on, and has Burke acting out of his own personal greed. It plays against expectations just like Bishop does on a first viewing.

I agree with this, the first three films portray the company in a morally grey light, for all intense and purposes, its just a company and one that has become interested in an alien life-from which they hope to acquire which is in contrast with the silly blatantly evil corporation of Alien Resurrection and most video games, who go around killing people left and right and happily use people as hosts for Xenomorphs.

In the first film, they don't want anyone harmed, but the specimen's priority is higher than the crew and the android Ash then makes its own interpretation of the orders, especially when the humans seek to kill the Alien and acts accordingly (similar to apollo). In the second film, I believe Burke was acting alone, and third film has W-Y make an offer to Ripley, they may have even gone through with it (we will never know), they never killed Morse either when the jaded Ripley believed they would kill witnesses. However, A:CM then has Michael Bishop as a total sociopath who kills people no longer useful to him.
The novelization actually casts The Company in a much kinder light where WY never wanted its crew to die but had hoped that the crew would be able to live through the entire voyage with the Alien alongside so they could pick up their paychecks back home.

I don't remember the novel at all and I don't think it's over that Ash is making the decision himself in the movie - I think Parker says "It's the damn company" (after "Ash is a god-damned robot!"? - I'm sure there are folk on here that know the movie line by line, though!)

But "the damn company" seem to be at the core of it and Ripley gets pretty shoddy treatment in Aliens as well.

However - I like the idea of making the company grey as opposed to black. I work for an evil corporation (I really do), but not everyone that works for the Company (see what I did there - capital C yo) is a corporate bastard who'd f**k you over for a goddamned percentage. Some are, but most aren't. However, decisions have to be made - in the case of Alien, WY are seeking a competitive advantage (though I've always asked the question "What could you do with an alien in terms of a bio weapon?" I guess the answer is "They didn't know it can't be controlled" (though Ash's "purity" monologue puts that on shaky ground)

But the idea that not all sci-fi corps are evil is a really good one and plays against the expectations (as you say) set up (intentionally or not) in the Aliens movies. Obviously, ts a theme with many future worlds (OCP, Tyrell, Soylent etc) so it'd be ace to see something that plays against that.

I'm a big advocate of a TV show for the Aliens 'verse and in that sort of set up, you really could get under the skin of that side of things?


Valaquen
Feb 18, 2015, 01:38:02 PM
Reply #605 on: Feb 18, 2015, 01:38:02 PM
The Company in Alien aren't directly involved with the whole Ash plot. Their only real culpability is to sanction the conditions that allow the whole shebang to happen.

Ridley:

Quote
"This particular corporation didn’t have a preconceived notion that an alien would be found on this mission, much less the particular Alien that is brought onto the ship. The idea of bringing it back alive would not have been on the minds of the corporate executives when they first received the alien transmission. They just had high expectations when they ordered the Nostromo to investigate – it was purely out of curiosity.

I would have thought that Earth would have previously received messages [from space], realised they were coming from an intelligent source but, for economy reasons, perhaps have postponed the preparation of an investigatory spacecraft. Then, one day, Nostromo is in the vicinity and the order is given for the crew to bring back the Alien, good or evil, without any real thought being given to the consequences.

Ash is on the Nostromo as a matter of protocol; it isnt out of the ordinary at all (though it is secretive, since the Company is paranoid).

Ridley again:

Quote
“[T]he world has been converted into the property of two or three large conglomerates whose sources of energy are provided by the exploitation of deposits in space. The super cargo spaceships that link Earth and the planets would transport enormous loads of minerals: gas, oil and the like. To dissuade the crews from rebelling and to protect their own interests, these companies might place spies aboard, or at least would make the crews believe in the presence of such spies. Gradually a legend would evolve that these people, whose identities remain unknown, are in fact robots. Furthermore, nobody would ever have proof. This would reinforce legends already currently among the astronauts.

This would seem to be the normal development of a huge corporation trying to protect its interests. In this particular future, it would be very easy for “pirating” to exist. Corporations will have to find ways to assure that vehicles carrying minerals or vital information will not be hijacked.”

A lot of interesting ideas in there that weren't really followed up on in the series.


HuDaFuK
Feb 18, 2015, 01:52:58 PM
Reply #606 on: Feb 18, 2015, 01:52:58 PM
Ash is on the Nostromo as a matter of protocol; it isnt out of the ordinary at all (though it is secretive, since the Company is paranoid).

Why then the plot point about him (apparently) being placed on board specifically for the trip? That makes it seems more malignant.


stroggificated
Feb 18, 2015, 02:24:52 PM
Reply #607 on: Feb 18, 2015, 02:24:52 PM
This all looks very great, but it's too late. It's over.
Even if this ever would happen, then please no stupid reboots or alternate universes. Hicks is dead and i'm very sure about that nobody wants Newt back. He or they should care a little bit about continuity. Make a real Alien 5 in form of replacing old Ripley with Clone Ripley and the scarred Marine with...i dunno...someone else than Hicks. Just let cheesy and stupid quotes, bubblegum chewing marines and Winona Ryder from Alien 4 out of it this time and it would still work fine. Otherwise Alien Isolation would be the better Alien 5 indeed. ::)


Valaquen
Feb 18, 2015, 02:32:04 PM
Reply #608 on: Feb 18, 2015, 02:32:04 PM
Ash is on the Nostromo as a matter of protocol; it isnt out of the ordinary at all (though it is secretive, since the Company is paranoid).

Why then the plot point about him (apparently) being placed on board specifically for the trip? That makes it seems more malignant.

To ensure that whatever is at the endpoint of that signal is investigated, as per protocol. It could have been alien technology which the Company would have wanted, could have been nothing, either way they didn't know. They don't trust their crews. It's all in the quotes above. Watching the film, you get the sense that without Ash pushing them the crew might not have even gone down there.

« Last Edit: Feb 18, 2015, 02:33:44 PM by Valaquen »


The Cruentus
Feb 18, 2015, 03:24:01 PM
Reply #610 on: Feb 18, 2015, 03:24:01 PM
One of the reasons I enjoy the fact that Aliens basically has WY completely unawares of what went on, and has Burke acting out of his own personal greed. It plays against expectations just like Bishop does on a first viewing.

I agree with this, the first three films portray the company in a morally grey light, for all intense and purposes, its just a company and one that has become interested in an alien life-from which they hope to acquire which is in contrast with the silly blatantly evil corporation of Alien Resurrection and most video games, who go around killing people left and right and happily use people as hosts for Xenomorphs.

In the first film, they don't want anyone harmed, but the specimen's priority is higher than the crew and the android Ash then makes its own interpretation of the orders, especially when the humans seek to kill the Alien and acts accordingly (similar to apollo). In the second film, I believe Burke was acting alone, and third film has W-Y make an offer to Ripley, they may have even gone through with it (we will never know), they never killed Morse either when the jaded Ripley believed they would kill witnesses. However, A:CM then has Michael Bishop as a total sociopath who kills people no longer useful to him.
The novelization actually casts The Company in a much kinder light where WY never wanted its crew to die but had hoped that the crew would be able to live through the entire voyage with the Alien alongside so they could pick up their paychecks back home.

I don't remember the novel at all and I don't think it's over that Ash is making the decision himself in the movie - I think Parker says "It's the damn company" (after "Ash is a god-damned robot!"? - I'm sure there are folk on here that know the movie line by line, though!)

But "the damn company" seem to be at the core of it and Ripley gets pretty shoddy treatment in Aliens as well.

You can't really take Parker's word as solid fact, at that point in the movie and what he has been through, he is biased against them, like Ripley eventually becomes. Ash's orders was simply to bring back the life form, other priorities secondary, he wasn't ordered to kill them or given any slight suggestion do so, he just interpretated the orders that way once it became clear that the others intended to kill the Alien which would have made him fail his top priority, I think this is what might have caused him to malfunction (if its not due to what Bishop said)


Russ
Feb 18, 2015, 04:15:59 PM
Reply #611 on: Feb 18, 2015, 04:15:59 PM
You can't really take Parker's word as solid fact, at that point in the movie and what he has been through, he is biased against them, like Ripley eventually becomes. Ash's orders was simply to bring back the life form, other priorities secondary, he wasn't ordered to kill them or given any slight suggestion do so, he just interpretated the orders that way once it became clear that the others intended to kill the Alien which would have made him fail his top priority, I think this is what might have caused him to malfunction (if its not due to what Bishop said)

My take away has always been that the Company was portrayed as "bad." I hear what you're saying, but in this instance you can take Parker at his word because all that "Big Bad Corporate" stuff was put in the script by Giler and Hill (I watched the documentary very recently - O'Bannon wasn't best pleased) - so in "filmic" terms, he's addressing one of the themes.

That aside - everything you, OM, Predxeno and Val have said makes complete sense to me and its a really interesting way of looking at it - if you take each instance (twitchy A2, Burke acting alone, Bishop2 imploring Ripley not to kill herself) it all makes great sense.


Nightgaunt
Feb 18, 2015, 09:49:18 PM
Reply #612 on: Feb 18, 2015, 09:49:18 PM

However - I like the idea of making the company grey as opposed to black. I work for an evil corporation (I really do), but not everyone that works for the Company (see what I did there - capital C yo) is a corporate bastard who'd f**k you over for a goddamned percentage. Some are, but most aren't. However, decisions have to be made - in the case of Alien, WY are seeking a competitive advantage (though I've always asked the question "What could you do with an alien in terms of a bio weapon?" I guess the answer is "They didn't know it can't be controlled" (though Ash's "purity" monologue puts that on shaky ground)

But the idea that not all sci-fi corps are evil is a really good one and plays against the expectations (as you say) set up (intentionally or not) in the Aliens movies. Obviously, ts a theme with many future worlds (OCP, Tyrell, Soylent etc) so it'd be ace to see something that plays against that.

I'm a big advocate of a TV show for the Aliens 'verse and in that sort of set up, you really could get under the skin of that side of things?

Yes to this. I think Weyland Yutani itself would make a great setting for a series, even without Ripley.   




 

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