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Author Topic: Did the Alien originally have a short life span?  (Read 5149 times)

LastSurvivor92
Oct 11, 2014, 12:57:50 PM
Topic on: Oct 11, 2014, 12:57:50 PM
I heard from someone on another forum that Scott indicated that the creature is dying by the 4th act when Ripley reaches the Narcissus, thats why it was so lethargic, sleepy and unresponsive to Ripley in the beginning when she was undressing and preparing for cyro. It had a very short life span originally . Which would be very understandable since it really was intended as a bioweapon to kill with agility and speed and could kill a lot within a short time span.

Is this at all true?


Vertigo
Oct 11, 2014, 01:07:51 PM
Reply #1 on: Oct 11, 2014, 01:07:51 PM
I certainly remember reading Giger saying something along those lines. It was supposed to become blacker as the film progressed, as if it was being "bruised" by the atmosphere.

Not sure if that was actually in the script or just Giger's design perspective, or Giger and Ridley's if you're remembering rightly too.


Valaquen
Oct 11, 2014, 02:10:27 PM
Reply #2 on: Oct 11, 2014, 02:10:27 PM
Ridley Scott on the issue of the Alien's lifespan:

Quote
“I wanted a sense of a timeless, slightly decaying creature that, maybe, only has a limited life cycle of, maybe, four days like an insect ... The Alien lifeform lived to reproduce … [Ripley] killed it, but it would have died soon anyway. It’s like a butterfly.”

As for:

Quote
I certainly remember reading Giger saying something along those lines. It was supposed to become blacker as the film progressed, as if it was being "bruised" by the atmosphere.

Not strictly true. The water and slime the suit was exposed to destroyed Giger's paint job, which was excruciating for him as he had to keep painting it (according to his diary, he was not happy about this). You can see some of the damage as the film progresses but it doesn't really have any plot significance. I think fans reached the conclusion that the Alien is dying onscreen themselves.

« Last Edit: Oct 11, 2014, 02:13:03 PM by Valaquen »

Elmazalman
Oct 11, 2014, 08:10:14 PM
Reply #3 on: Oct 11, 2014, 08:10:14 PM
Veronica Cartwright once mentioned that it would darken and bruise like fruit as it matured.


Vertigo
Oct 11, 2014, 08:40:24 PM
Reply #4 on: Oct 11, 2014, 08:40:24 PM
Oh dear. Not being able to tell Veronica Cartright and HR Giger apart is probably a sure sign that it's time for me to get my eyes tested.


SM
Oct 11, 2014, 08:55:00 PM
Reply #5 on: Oct 11, 2014, 08:55:00 PM
Originally, originally it was supposed to live for centuries.  But as per above that idea changed by the time they got to shooting.


Xhan
Oct 12, 2014, 12:02:32 AM
Reply #6 on: Oct 12, 2014, 12:02:32 AM
Ridley Scott on the issue of the Alien's lifespan:

Quote
“I wanted a sense of a timeless, slightly decaying creature that, maybe, only has a limited life cycle of, maybe, four days like an insect ... The Alien lifeform lived to reproduce … [Ripley] killed it, but it would have died soon anyway. It’s like a butterfly.”

As for:

Quote
I certainly remember reading Giger saying something along those lines. It was supposed to become blacker as the film progressed, as if it was being "bruised" by the atmosphere.

Not strictly true. The water and slime the suit was exposed to destroyed Giger's paint job, which was excruciating for him as he had to keep painting it (according to his diary, he was not happy about this). You can see some of the damage as the film progresses but it doesn't really have any plot significance. I think fans reached the conclusion that the Alien is dying onscreen themselves.

Actually I'm pretty sure the bronzing was done to show aging, not necessarily dying, but certainly aging. I'll dig around for the article and see if it's the interviewer or Giger.

Quote
live for centuries

Funny how that one became true by accident... or simply lack of professionalism.


oduodu
Oct 13, 2014, 09:04:42 AM
Reply #7 on: Oct 13, 2014, 09:04:42 AM
wow this should become a sticky - see ask those who knows and you get answers......

this should be a reference thread.

thanks guys - brilliant !!


System Apollo
Oct 13, 2014, 09:26:06 AM
Reply #8 on: Oct 13, 2014, 09:26:06 AM
If the alien was to die in a short amount of time wouldn't the self-destruct of the Nostromo be in vain?


oduodu
Oct 13, 2014, 09:52:14 AM
Reply #9 on: Oct 13, 2014, 09:52:14 AM
when she activated the self destruct she didn't know this.

and i think she didn't know it when she blew it out of the narcasis.

not sure though.....

« Last Edit: Oct 13, 2014, 02:41:49 PM by oduodu »

System Apollo
Oct 13, 2014, 10:02:52 AM
Reply #10 on: Oct 13, 2014, 10:02:52 AM
I didn't say that she did.


oduodu
Oct 13, 2014, 10:37:58 AM
Reply #11 on: Oct 13, 2014, 10:37:58 AM
then what is the relevance of the question ??


System Apollo
Oct 13, 2014, 11:12:10 AM
Reply #12 on: Oct 13, 2014, 11:12:10 AM
then what is the relevance of the question ??



Probably the fact that the viewer isn't perceiving the plot just through how Ripley interprets it...

If the viewer was to know that the alien was dying than they would see that blowing up the Nostromo was something done in vain...

Regardless towards OP:
There wasn't enough takes of the Alien to identify that it was precipitating towards death in the Narcissus. Scott merely implied that that was the direction he wanted to go but didn't fully deliver it through his presentation. And on another note, Scott's indication of his Alien dying in less than 24 hours contradicts Giger's "4 days like Butterfly" concept.


oduodu
Oct 13, 2014, 11:55:43 AM
Reply #13 on: Oct 13, 2014, 11:55:43 AM
ok.........


HuDaFuK
Oct 13, 2014, 01:28:29 PM
Reply #14 on: Oct 13, 2014, 01:28:29 PM
Didn't one of the making-of books on the film suggest the Alien had a short lifespan and was in the Narcissus because it was looking for somewhere quiet to snuff it?


 

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