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Author Topic: Does it bother you the Alien leaves corpses everyw...  (Read 6012 times)

PRI. HUDSON
Aug 18, 2014, 04:23:42 PM
Reply #15 on: Aug 18, 2014, 04:23:42 PM
OMFG, so much NITPICKING.

Did OP watch any of the films?

No I just happen to be a member of a fan forum.

High value post there, thanks for your contribution, very insightful.

Go watch Alien 3 and see how many bodies were left behind. Go watch Alien, see how many bodies were left behind.

Does the Alien take people away often? Yes. Does the Alien do it ALL the time, every time? No.

I'm glad you're here to help me out. I'd never noticed that before. So I should skip Aliens and Alien R then?

LOL, you wise ass. I am not wasting my time. Aliens took people in 2 of the films and killed people in 2 of the films. So even in the films there wasn't consistency ALL the time. Also, I am pretty sure an Alien killed one of the crew members and left him in the hallway as he pursued the group down the dead end corridor.


SM
Aug 18, 2014, 10:30:14 PM
Reply #16 on: Aug 18, 2014, 10:30:14 PM
Quote
So I should skip Aliens and Alien R then?

You skipped the actual game before deciding it left "corpses everywhere".


Nazrel
Aug 19, 2014, 08:58:29 AM
Reply #17 on: Aug 19, 2014, 08:58:29 AM
Quote
So I should skip Aliens and Alien R then?

You skipped the actual game before deciding it left "corpses everywhere".

We haven't even seen a quarter of the game. we have no idea what the left over damage will be like. Didn't they state that there would not be cocooning in the game, in an interview a while ago?

I would love to see it  in the game though


SM
Aug 19, 2014, 10:33:26 PM
Reply #18 on: Aug 19, 2014, 10:33:26 PM
Quote
We haven't even seen a quarter of the game. we have no idea what the left over damage will be like.

Precisely my point.  Wait till it's out and then ask the question.


Ash 937
Aug 20, 2014, 02:33:42 AM
Reply #19 on: Aug 20, 2014, 02:33:42 AM
In Aliens, the xenos have a collective conscience to abduct humans and get them face hugged because it serves their community structure.  Without the hive, they are lost.  That's why the xenos in Alien and Alien3 run around unpredictably and kill most things as they encounter them.  I think they are actually scarier that way.


SM
Aug 20, 2014, 02:59:40 AM
Reply #20 on: Aug 20, 2014, 02:59:40 AM
They didn't seem terribly lost in Alien and Alien3.


Ferazel
Aug 24, 2014, 06:53:56 AM
Reply #21 on: Aug 24, 2014, 06:53:56 AM
The aliens lifecycle has always been fairly questionable. Viruses and parasites tend to only kill their hosts after they've reproduced enough to infect others. The aliens seem to decide to kill or impregnate arbitrarily.

If we just go by the first movie the alien lifecycle was never really explained. What causes the human corpses to turn into eggs in the cut scene where Ripley stumbles upon Brett and Dallas? If we never had Aliens or that human into egg scene, I believe that having the alien be a completely autonomous bio weapon is an interesting take on the creature. Or as Ash described it, a perfect killing machine. It also seems to be more in line with Scott's interpretation of it from both Alien and Prometheus. The creatures were meant to be used as weapons. Highly dangerous weapons that can turn on their owners, but weapons nonetheless.


Space7Horror
Aug 24, 2014, 07:45:30 PM
Reply #22 on: Aug 24, 2014, 07:45:30 PM
The aliens lifecycle has always been fairly questionable. Viruses and parasites tend to only kill their hosts after they've reproduced enough to infect others. The aliens seem to decide to kill or impregnate arbitrarily.

If we just go by the first movie the alien lifecycle was never really explained. What causes the human corpses to turn into eggs in the cut scene where Ripley stumbles upon Brett and Dallas? If we never had Aliens or that human into egg scene, I believe that having the alien be a completely autonomous bio weapon is an interesting take on the creature. Or as Ash described it, a perfect killing machine. It also seems to be more in line with Scott's interpretation of it from both Alien and Prometheus. The creatures were meant to be used as weapons. Highly dangerous weapons that can turn on their owners, but weapons nonetheless.

The way egg morphing works makes the Alien less productive the way I see it.  It's a really creepy concept that I wish they went into a little more, but having the alien turn a person into an egg then have another person be impregnated to die just seems like to much to reproduce.  Cocconing a person then having a queen lay eggs is more productive since the alien could itself turn into a queen. Egg morphing could be a solution when the alien is all alone though like in the movie Alien and is not sure if transforming into a queen is the safest idea.


Ash 937
Aug 25, 2014, 12:37:44 AM
Reply #23 on: Aug 25, 2014, 12:37:44 AM
The way egg morphing works makes the Alien less productive the way I see it.  It's a really creepy concept that I wish they went into a little more, but having the alien turn a person into an egg then have another person be impregnated to die just seems like to much to reproduce. 

The fact that we only received a glimpse of the eggmorphing cycle served to make the film more terrifying than if there was any attempt to explain it.

Half of the deaths attributed to the xenomorph on the Nostromo were the result of crew members looking for it.  The fact that this one will consciously stalk characters is, imo, more in tune with the characteristics of the xenos in Aliens than with the original film.  Hell, I don't even think Kane's son had even intended to get inside the Narcissus with Ripley at the end of the film.  I always thought it seemed more like it was looking for shelter and wanted to be left alone.


SM
Aug 25, 2014, 01:48:12 AM
Reply #24 on: Aug 25, 2014, 01:48:12 AM
Quote
If we just go by the first movie the alien lifecycle was never really explained. What causes the human corpses to turn into eggs in the cut scene where Ripley stumbles upon Brett and Dallas?

The Alien did it.


HuDaFuK
Sep 02, 2014, 08:34:16 AM
Reply #25 on: Sep 02, 2014, 08:34:16 AM
The way egg morphing works makes the Alien less productive the way I see it.

I'm with you on that. I love the idea of people being turned into eggs from a horror point of view, but it just doesn't make much logical sense. You'd need two hosts for every one Alien. That's pretty wasteful. You'd only get half the Aliens you would if you were using a Queen and eggs, less if you consider the people who will inevitably be killed during the capturing process.


SM
Sep 02, 2014, 08:56:15 AM
Reply #26 on: Sep 02, 2014, 08:56:15 AM
Alien bursts, matures, morphs its former host into an egg.  All in the space 4 or 5 hours.  Multiply depending on number of available hosts, with gestation times of around 16 hours, give or take.

Queens, on the other hand, take about 3 days to gestate and another 3 days before they start laying.

Once they do, of course, you have lots and lots more eggs.

But given a large number of available hosts, you could have a bunch of Aliens already setting up a hive in those 6 days.


windebieste
Sep 02, 2014, 10:37:16 AM
Reply #27 on: Sep 02, 2014, 10:37:16 AM
Most parasites are wasteful.  Like a fungus that inevitably kills its host tree.  The host lives long enough for the parasite to fulfill it's purpose of procreating its next generation. 

Eggmorphing is much the same thing.   The Alien eggmorphs its host into an egg.  The egg then sits dormant for any amount of time - in the case of an Alien, this could be any amount of time.  Centuries or possibly even millennia to our knowledge.

As it looks as though the Alien is intended as a weapon against human beings (as hinted at by what we can project from what we have seen in 'Prometheus') its intended purpose is to wipe out humans and it may be intended for it to perform this task in a geometric progression.  An eggmorphed human needs another human host for the facehugger stage and if this level of prolific progression were to reach its conclusion, eventually, the host species, in this case homo sapiens sapiens (us) is destined to become extinct through such 'wasteful' geometric progression.

A very elegant weapon, wouldn't you say?   In the extreme that's what such a weapon is for, to be wasteful and wipe out its host stock.

-Windebieste.

[EDiT] - Oh, and 'conservation' holds no meaning to a parasite.  Symbiotic relationships are very, very different.

« Last Edit: Sep 02, 2014, 10:40:39 AM by windebieste »

PsyKore
Sep 02, 2014, 10:59:02 AM
Reply #28 on: Sep 02, 2014, 10:59:02 AM
Most parasites are wasteful.  Like a fungus that inevitably kills its host tree.  The host lives long enough for the parasite to fulfill it's purpose of procreating its next generation. 

Eggmorphing is much the same thing.   The Alien eggmorphs its host into an egg.  The egg then sits dormant for any amount of time - in the case of an Alien, this could be any amount of time.  Centuries or possibly even millennia to our knowledge.

As it looks as though the Alien is intended as a weapon against human beings (as hinted at by what we can project from what we have seen in 'Prometheus') its intended purpose is to wipe out humans and it may be intended for it to perform this task in a geometric progression.  An eggmorphed human needs another human host for the facehugger stage and if this level of prolific progression were to reach its conclusion, eventually, the host species, in this case homo sapiens sapiens (us) is destined to become extinct through such 'wasteful' geometric progression.

A very elegant weapon, wouldn't you say?   In the extreme that's what such a weapon is for, to be wasteful and wipe out its host stock.

-Windebieste.

[EDiT] - Oh, and 'conservation' holds no meaning to a parasite.  Symbiotic relationships are very, very different.

Hmm, that fits pretty nicely; never thought of it like that.

I was also gonna say, what if the egg is actually the final stage of the cycle, not the adult Alien? The adult could just be a means to leave behind some eggs.


HuDaFuK
Sep 02, 2014, 11:04:59 AM
Reply #29 on: Sep 02, 2014, 11:04:59 AM
A very elegant weapon, wouldn't you say?   In the extreme that's what such a weapon is for, to be wasteful and wipe out its host stock.

That depends entirely on you accepting the whole 'Aliens are engineered weapons' theory though. If it's a natural creature it seems less sensible.


 

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