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Author Topic: Rebellion Coming Back?  (Read 33541 times)


Corporal Hicks
Jul 14, 2014, 08:04:03 AM
Reply #1 on: Jul 14, 2014, 08:04:03 AM
Q
Nice to see a little bit more of the comments. I still hold AvP Classic and 2010 in high esteem. Kinda "meh" on Requiem. I would absolutely love to see Rebellion come back and have another crack at the license but I want them to be giving the time to do a proper game and not rush something out like last time.


Spoonman101
Jul 14, 2014, 08:15:34 AM
Reply #2 on: Jul 14, 2014, 08:15:34 AM
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The rush last time was ridiculous. It was a very underrated game with a lot of potential. If they will make a sequel (fingers crossed) I am confident it would be great.


Vertigo
Jul 14, 2014, 04:32:36 PM
Reply #3 on: Jul 14, 2014, 04:32:36 PM
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I thought AvP2010 was in development for 4 or 5 years?


Corporal Hicks
Jul 14, 2014, 06:02:58 PM
Reply #4 on: Jul 14, 2014, 06:02:58 PM
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No. The released version was build they had around a year to do (Ikarop can probably correct me).


ikarop
Jul 15, 2014, 12:17:43 AM
Reply #5 on: Jul 15, 2014, 12:17:43 AM
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A year passed between the announcement and the release so definitely more than a year. I can't remember the time frames since it's been a long while but digging up some of my posts:

AvP3 came about after a successful prototype game. Set on Earth, it was loosely based on the concept of a lone Predator tracking down Aliens. When a game of AvP:R was asked for there was no time to do a 360/PS3 game, so the PSP game of AvP:R was started, with production of the full AvP game starting a little bit later.

Rebellion was developing AvP for Vivendi from around late 2006/early 2007 IIRC. That'd put production time around 3 - 2,5 years probably.


OpenMaw
Jul 15, 2014, 01:49:47 AM
Reply #6 on: Jul 15, 2014, 01:49:47 AM
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Which is probably about half the time you'd want for a game of that scale.


ikarop
Jul 15, 2014, 05:38:08 AM
Reply #7 on: Jul 15, 2014, 05:38:08 AM
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Not really that much time. Plus the code changed hands which always adds to development time since different publishers have different views on what they want.

Either way, Sega simply needed to make quick buck after the issues with A:CM and the RPG. Putting more money and resources into AvP to have a polished product wasn't on their plans.

« Last Edit: Jul 15, 2014, 05:58:31 AM by ikarop »

Kimarhi
Jul 15, 2014, 06:02:10 AM
Reply #8 on: Jul 15, 2014, 06:02:10 AM
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if they make it more like the original avp then I'd be down if they make it like 2010 with the button mashing melee silliness with the nonsensical story then no joy. 



Corporal Hicks
Jul 15, 2014, 10:30:18 AM
Reply #10 on: Jul 15, 2014, 10:30:18 AM
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So not quite as drastic as I made out but still short by game dev life-span??

I liked the idea of the close-quarters stuff. It made it very in-your-face, more involved and visceral. However, the mechanic was maybe too simplified? Insta-grabs of death, button mashing, vulnerable on the outside. I still loved the approach but I'm not blind it having been able to be better.

Yeah, the story was a letdown but AvP1 didn't really have a story. I would love them to actually have a coherent and interwined story. It's what made AvP2 so good.


ikarop
Jul 15, 2014, 12:40:08 PM
Reply #11 on: Jul 15, 2014, 12:40:08 PM
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Not short. A game like this would probably take around 2 years on average. Rebellion just needed a few extra months to polish things up which Sega didn't want to give them. Sega wanted to hit a specific date so the game was rushed out of the door. Yet they kept delaying A:CM and getting distracted by it which I'm sure was very frustrating for Rebellion.

I believe there are very few people from the AvP2010 team still at Rebellion anyway so even if they had another go at it, it would be very different game than what AvP2010 could have been without all these issues.

« Last Edit: Jul 15, 2014, 12:57:03 PM by ikarop »

Vertigo
Jul 15, 2014, 02:19:34 PM
Reply #12 on: Jul 15, 2014, 02:19:34 PM
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2.5 years sounds pretty damn short for a clean-sheet (no existing assets), full-price, multi-platform game with story and multiplayer on a latest-generation FPS engine. Presumably they already had most or all of the engine developed at that point, otherwise that would be a ridiculous time-frame.

Most clean-sheet AAA titles I'm familiar with (HL2, Doom 3, Rage, UT3, Max Payne 3, Bioshock Infinite) took at least four years.


WinterActual
Jul 15, 2014, 03:43:17 PM
Reply #13 on: Jul 15, 2014, 03:43:17 PM
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The Asura engine is very advanced though. It's still being used for benchmarks. It have nice graphic features and its nicely optimized. The only flaw of AvP 2010 is that SEGA pushed the release so the game lacks features, but again thats because of the lack of time to implement anything, its not because of the devs or the engine. What a shame really. I wish Reb decided to fund the SDK tools out of their pockets but sadly that was not the case :\


The Necronoir
Jul 16, 2014, 01:27:20 PM
Reply #14 on: Jul 16, 2014, 01:27:20 PM
Q
The Asura engine is very advanced though. It's still being used for benchmarks. It have nice graphic features and its nicely optimized. The only flaw of AvP 2010 is that SEGA pushed the release so the game lacks features, but again thats because of the lack of time to implement anything, its not because of the devs or the engine. What a shame really. I wish Reb decided to fund the SDK tools out of their pockets but sadly that was not the case :\
Having an existing game engine doesn't give you much of a boost these days. Pretty much every AAA title out there is using an existing licensed or proprietary engine, and you still need to write unique code and create assets for each individual project (though less so for short-windows sequels, eg many of the Assassin's Creed titles).


 

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