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Author Topic: Things of note in Weyland Information page  (Read 15335 times)

Cvalda
Mar 22, 2012, 11:29:47 PM
Reply #45 on: Mar 22, 2012, 11:29:47 PM
My only half-gripe now lies with holographic displays, which seems a bit inconsistent when compared with the other films in the series - but when compared along side ALIEN only - has nothing to base itself off, therefore does not effect technological continuity in my opinion. A rudimentary refinery and mining vessel has no need for anything like that.
The problem is holograms don't show up in either ALIENS or ALIEN 3. ALIEN 3 is excusable, because it's a decrepit, half-abandoned prison of all things, but the Sulaco takes place almost a century after PROMETHEUS and... no holograms, neither on Gateway Station or the Sulaco. Those damned holograms make for troubling continuity transition. Oh well. Nothing we can do now but fanwank explanations. :P


RICH-ENGLAND
Mar 23, 2012, 12:02:31 AM
Reply #46 on: Mar 23, 2012, 12:02:31 AM
Here it is, my opinion and perspective about why Ridley Chose a more high tech future as opposed to a low tech one. Quite frankly, looking at where we are right now in 2012 with our iPads and our phones and 3D, etc.... I believe if the larger audience were to walk in to the theater and see a decidedly low tech future I don't think it would translate as well. For the core fans I think we'd be like "kool" but because of where our collective technology is at the moment, the future of the 1970s isn't as plausible as the future of 2012....I would bet that it would even seem a bit hokey. When I watch ALIEN now, and see the crew pushing actual buttons and knowing that we're so far beyond that as a world culture, I think Ridley mad the right choice. I don't think it's about pandering to a specific tech demographic as it was just freshening up the brand. With newer tech there's more room to tell a better story. That's all I have the moment, so shoot me. ;)


but basically this is what ive been saying all along and youve been disagreeing!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
but it is a certain demographic, its 18 to 30s which for the most part will be gamers and tech heads.

hes made it modern tech to appeal to a modern audience, he doesnt have a great deal of choice in it and i understand it, all ive said is that it doesnt match up. hmm, youve lost me now...

thanks

rich

I don't remember people complaining when Robert Wise and the art and production designers updated the Enterprise, from the design aesthetic of what the "future" might look like to people living in the mid 60s to what the "future" might look like for people living at the end of the 70s.
I think the griping stems from the inconsistency of Scott's reverse engineering of ALIEN's aesthetic. For example, the interiors of the ship and the screen panels are pretty damn consistent with ALIEN--the new screens may now be flat, but they have the same lo-fi look to them. It's great. And then the cliche hologram stuff comes in... throwing a wrench into an otherwise excellent keeping of continuity.

Quote
The problems occur when you go in the other direction.  Kubrick was a brilliant visionary, and simply nailed the "future-tech" that is presented in "2001:  A Space Odyssey".  Not only did he foresee the use of 3-D computer graphics (used in the various spacecrafts cockpits for navigation and docking), but they friggin' had flat screen displays.  Heck, Poole and Bowman had iPad like devices on the Discovery.  Yet, for some incomprehensible reason, in "2010:  The Year We Make Contact", they have regressed to using old CRT monitors.  I always hated that.
Ugh, that movie. One of the worst sequels ever. Even worse because the book was a very good, entertaining read.

this, ive never really been into star trek tbh, but i did like the new one.

but agree with what cvalda is saying, its more to do with him fitting it in an existing timeline and reverse engineering, not rebooting which is different.

thanks

rich

« Last Edit: Mar 23, 2012, 12:07:34 AM by RICH-ENGLAND »

josh_axey
Mar 23, 2012, 12:12:52 AM
Reply #47 on: Mar 23, 2012, 12:12:52 AM
My only half-gripe now lies with holographic displays, which seems a bit inconsistent when compared with the other films in the series - but when compared along side ALIEN only - has nothing to base itself off, therefore does not effect technological continuity in my opinion. A rudimentary refinery and mining vessel has no need for anything like that.
The problem is holograms don't show up in either ALIENS or ALIEN 3. ALIEN 3 is excusable, because it's a decrepit, half-abandoned prison of all things, but the Sulaco takes place almost a century after PROMETHEUS and... no holograms, neither on Gateway Station or the Sulaco. Those damned holograms make for troubling continuity transition. Oh well. Nothing we can do now but fanwank explanations. :P

[troll] Pretty much. Maybe they are a fad like 3D is these days and people pulled their heads out of their butts and realised this - thus removing them from any future vessels etc.  :P [/troll]

Anyway.... still holding out to see what they'll put on the Module B page, points heavily to the David 8 announcement stuff. I'm sure there will be juicy tid-bits there for us to wonder over and speculate on :).


Cvalda
Mar 23, 2012, 12:14:57 AM
Reply #48 on: Mar 23, 2012, 12:14:57 AM
Anyway.... still holding out to see what they'll put on the Module B page, points heavily to the David 8 announcement stuff. I'm sure there will be juicy tid-bits there for us to wonder over and speculate on :).
Unless it's just a link to the already available-elsewhere David 8 viral vid :P Which would not surprise me the least bit.


Eva
Mar 23, 2012, 12:16:29 AM
Reply #49 on: Mar 23, 2012, 12:16:29 AM
Imo, people are just going to have to accept that Alien was a product of its time and Prometheus will be the same. Sure the old screen technology doesn't quite fit anymore in retrospective and perhaps Ridley could have used some front projection tech and coated glass element to mimic transparent displays +30 years ago. But I guess he had enough on his hands as it was.

I'm not distracted by high tech monitors in Prometheus. Theere's enough retro-design all over the production connecting this with Alien and I couldn't ask for more.  :)


Cvalda
Mar 23, 2012, 12:18:44 AM
Reply #50 on: Mar 23, 2012, 12:18:44 AM
I'm not distracted by high tech monitors in Prometheus. Theere's enough retro-design all over the production connecting this with Alien and I couldn't ask for more.  :)
I don't mind the new monitors--they fit well with what we see in ALIEN, with a decidedly lo-fi look to them, just flat screen as opposed to CRT. They work. It's the holograms that are annoying. :P


Valaquen
Mar 23, 2012, 12:24:11 AM
Reply #51 on: Mar 23, 2012, 12:24:11 AM
Ridley also wanted flat screen, clipped monitors for Alien. They couldn't make 'em. Yeah, the holograms annoy, but only because I'm a stickler for consistency. I guess the Sulaco and the USCM were undergoing budget cuts (/endfanwank)


Face Jockey
Mar 23, 2012, 12:47:21 AM
Reply #52 on: Mar 23, 2012, 12:47:21 AM
The majority of people who go to see this film may have never even watched an Alien film. Seeing a "retro" looking ship with no explanation and decidedly anachronistic technology would be distracting and undermine the realism and plausibility.

The original Nostromo was not a fantastical design, it appeared very functional at least in context with the time period it was made. There was also a guy walking around in a rubber monster suit without CGI effects, which may end up looking low-tech or inconsistent with what we are shown in Prometheus as far as creature design. I wouldn't expect the filmmakers to solely use rubber suit monsters or Alien puppets in order to maintain continuity.


Ballzanya
Mar 23, 2012, 12:50:26 AM
Reply #53 on: Mar 23, 2012, 12:50:26 AM
My only half-gripe now lies with holographic displays, which seems a bit inconsistent when compared with the other films in the series - but when compared along side ALIEN only - has nothing to base itself off, therefore does not effect technological continuity in my opinion. A rudimentary refinery and mining vessel has no need for anything like that.
The problem is holograms don't show up in either ALIENS or ALIEN 3. ALIEN 3 is excusable, because it's a decrepit, half-abandoned prison of all things, but the Sulaco takes place almost a century after PROMETHEUS and... no holograms, neither on Gateway Station or the Sulaco. Those damned holograms make for troubling continuity transition. Oh well. Nothing we can do now but fanwank explanations. :P

Um.. in the special edition of Aliens there is basically "holodeck" technology creating that virtual park where Ripley is sitting while waiting for Burke.


Valaquen
Mar 23, 2012, 12:52:58 AM
Reply #54 on: Mar 23, 2012, 12:52:58 AM
^ It is pretty, pretty low-fi though... Very low-fi...


josh_axey
Mar 23, 2012, 12:55:39 AM
Reply #55 on: Mar 23, 2012, 12:55:39 AM
^ It is pretty, pretty low-fi though... Very low-fi...

Yeah.

I always took it for a simple projector that was displaying a calming image on the white wall (obviously this was the practical effect) - and never took much more than that away from it tech wise. They are trying to retrofit it in the Weyland time line, with one of those points on it - but yeah... I never took it to be hi-tech.




SM
Mar 23, 2012, 01:24:39 AM
Reply #58 on: Mar 23, 2012, 01:24:39 AM
Quote
Um.. in the special edition of Aliens there is basically "holodeck" technology creating that virtual park where Ripley is sitting while waiting for Burke.

It's not a holodeck - it's a projection screen.  We could do that now.


ThisBethesdaSea
Mar 23, 2012, 01:48:09 AM
Reply #59 on: Mar 23, 2012, 01:48:09 AM
I don't believe that ALIENS, ALIEN3 or ALIEN : Resurrection showed enough of their tech for us to judge whether or not Prometheus is too advanced. There was no opportunity to see any of it. There was a computer screen and a bio-scan in 3, and I don't remember seeing any sort of consoles in ALIENS or AR.

The Prometheus is a science vessel, uniquely equipped for research and observation. As such it makes plausible sense that the tech were seeing had no opportunity to be shown in any of the films. This is a different story, and a different mission. I don't think that's too hard of a stretch.


 

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