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Author Topic: Dinosaurs and other prehistoric creatures  (Read 200457 times)

Phobos
Nov 19, 2020, 04:17:29 AM
Reply #1530 on: Nov 19, 2020, 04:17:29 AM
You start off as a human (Jack) but get to play as Kong. It's an old game but was fun as hell as a kid.

Cameroceras


"Partial remnants of shells indicate that Cameroceras could reach 30 feet (9 m) in length. Cameroceras was probably the largest marine predator during the Paleozoic era; it navigated the deep sea (probably the only kind of sea that could fit it) and waited in ambush for prey. It was almost blind, and it was a lazy drifter like its closest modern relative, the Nautilus."

« Last Edit: Nov 19, 2020, 04:24:11 AM by Gr33n M4n »



Immortan Jonesy
Nov 19, 2020, 10:34:57 PM
Reply #1533 on: Nov 19, 2020, 10:34:57 PM
I don't do that.

Maybe it would be good for you.  You could meet Ken Ham and ask him if he remembers SM from Straya.

If your SM is an acronym for Sienna Miller, I don't blame him. But no, she is not Aussie I'm afraid. Although I'm sure she has traveled to Australia on vacation at some point in her life. So who knows.



Phobos
Nov 22, 2020, 03:30:33 AM
Reply #1534 on: Nov 22, 2020, 03:30:33 AM
Therizinosaurus


''Therizinosaurus is a genus of very large theropod dinosaurs. Therizinosaurus comprises the single species T. cheloniformis, which lived in the late Cretaceous Period (late Campanian-early Maastrichtian stages, around 70 million years ago), and was one of the last and largest representatives of its unique group, the Therizinosauria. Fossils of this species were first discovered in Mongolia and were originally thought to belong to a turtle-like reptile (hence the species name, T. cheloniformis – "turtle-formed"). It is known only from a few bones, including gigantic hand claws, from which it gets its name.''


Immortan Jonesy
Nov 22, 2020, 10:50:06 PM
Reply #1535 on: Nov 22, 2020, 10:50:06 PM
"Dilophosaurus was a fast-moving meat-eating dinosaur that lived in what is now North America during the Early Jurassic, about 193 million years ago. Three skeletons were discovered in northern Arizona in 1940, and the two best preserved were collected in 1942.  A kink in its upper jaw may mean that it ate a certain kind of food, or attacked by gripping and holding on to prey – modern crocodiles have a similar kink.

The pair of thin bony crests on its head may have been for display."

Length: 7 m

Mass:400 kg










"Cryolophosaurus is a genus of large theropods known from only a single species Cryolophosaurus ellioti, known from the early Jurassic period of Antarctica.

Cryolophosaurus possessed a distinctive "pompadour" crest that spanned the head from side to side. Based on evidence from related species and studies of bone texture, it is thought that this bizarre crest was used for intra-species recognition. The brain of Cryolophosaurus was also more primitive than those of other theropods".

Height: 2.5 m (At the hips)

Length: 6.5 – 8 m

Mass: 460 – 500 kg






Immortan Jonesy
Nov 26, 2020, 03:51:07 AM
Reply #1536 on: Nov 26, 2020, 03:51:07 AM
A neovenatorid with T. Rex arms.

"Gualicho is a genus of theropod dinosaur. The type species is Gualicho shinyae. Gualicho lived in what is now northern Patagonia, on what was then a South American island continent split off from the supercontinent Gondwana".



"Like the well-known Tyrannosaurus, to which it has been compared, the 6–7 m (20–23 ft) Gualicho possesses reduced arms and possibly two fingered hands, although a 2020 study suggests enough of the third metacarpal is present for a third finger. The finding of Gualicho indicates that carnosaurs may have been subject to the same evolution of limb-reduction as tyrannosaurids and abelisaurids, provided that Gualicho is a carnosaur in the first place."



Phobos
Nov 26, 2020, 06:59:58 PM
Reply #1537 on: Nov 26, 2020, 06:59:58 PM
Archaeotherium



''Most modern-day artriodactyls aren't that scary—the group contains deer, sheep, and llamas. But some of their ancient relatives were downright ferocious. Take Archaeotherium. They're sometimes referred to as hell pigs, and while the name fits their appearance, they're not actually pigs—they're more closely related to hippos and whales. Archaeotherium was a cow-sized predatory omnivore with huge jaws that it used to hunt animals including prehistoric rhinos.''





Phobos
Nov 30, 2020, 04:41:19 AM
Reply #1540 on: Nov 30, 2020, 04:41:19 AM
Hadrosaurus




''Hadrosaurus was a duck-billed, plant-eating dinosaur that lived during the late Cretaceous period, roughly 84 to 71 million years ago. Hadrosaurids (meaning "bulky lizards") were the family of duck-billed, herbivorous dinosaurs. They were the most common dinosaurs. Hadrosaurs ranged in size from 10 to 40 feet (3 to 12 m) long. They had horny, toothless beaks and hundreds of cheek teeth in the sides of their jaws. The duck-billed dinosaurs had the most teeth; they had up to about 960 cheek teeth.''






Gilfryd
Dec 01, 2020, 12:55:48 AM
Reply #1541 on: Dec 01, 2020, 12:55:48 AM
Archaeotherium



''Most modern-day artriodactyls aren't that scary—the group contains deer, sheep, and llamas. But some of their ancient relatives were downright ferocious. Take Archaeotherium. They're sometimes referred to as hell pigs, and while the name fits their appearance, they're not actually pigs—they're more closely related to hippos and whales. Archaeotherium was a cow-sized predatory omnivore with huge jaws that it used to hunt animals including prehistoric rhinos.''



Entelodonts are legit horrifying.



Phobos
Dec 04, 2020, 08:00:26 AM
Reply #1542 on: Dec 04, 2020, 08:00:26 AM
Megalania



"Megalania was a large monitor lizard that lived in Australia during the Pleistocene Epoch, about 2.5 million years ago. The massive reptile was about 23 feet (7 meters) long, the size of a Saltwater Crocodile, the largest reptile alive today, making it the largest lizard that ever lived. It also had a venomous bite just like its relative, the Komodo Dragon."




Immortan Jonesy
Dec 04, 2020, 07:54:45 PM
Reply #1543 on: Dec 04, 2020, 07:54:45 PM


There are only 3 dinosaurs (Megalosaurus, Iguanodon, Hylaeosaurus) but this must be the first Jurassic Park  :laugh:


"To The Victorians, The Crystal Palace in London was the marvel of a gilded age. The showpiece of the 1851 Great Exhibition, it housed exhibits showcasing the skill and ingenuity of the British Empire, the biggest the world had ever seen".

🍃~ Crystal Palace Dinosaurs ~🍃


"The grounds around the building became known as Crystal Palace Park and were extensively renovated. As part of this renovation, sculptor Benjamin Waterhouse Hawkins was hired to build life-size models of extinct animals. However, upon receiving advice from famed paleontologist Sir Richard Owen, he decided to build dinosaurs as well. In total, Hawkins made thirty three models of over fifteen different species of which the most famous were Iguanodon, Megalosaurus, and, despite not being a dinosaur at all, Ichthyosaurus. Hawkins celebrated the launch of the models on New Year Eve 1853 by holding a banquet for twenty people".

~ Atlas Obscura ▶Abstract dinosaur models in London

Ichthyosaurs


Size. Ichthyosaurs averaged about 2–4 m (6.6–13.1 ft) in length.

Ichthyosaurs ◀Greek for 'fish lizard'▶were giant marine reptiles that resembled fish and dolphins. Ichthyosaurs thrived during much of the Mesozoic era; based on fossil evidence, they first appeared approximately 245 million years ago and disappeared about 90 million years ago, about 25 million years before the dinosaurs became extinct. During the Middle Triassic Period, ichthyosaurs evolved from as-yet unidentified land reptiles that moved back into the water, in a development parallel to that of modern-day dolphins and whales.

Hylaeosaurus

Length: 3 – 7.6 m (Estimated)
Mass: 300 – 1,000 kg

Hylaeosaurus ◀Greek: hylaios/ὑλαῖος "belonging to the forest" and sauros/σαυρος "lizard"▶ is a herbivorous ankylosaurian dinosaur that lived about 136 million years ago, in the late Valanginian stage of the early Cretaceous period of England.

Hylaeosaurus was one of the first dinosaurs to be discovered, in 1832 by Gideon Mantell. In 1842 its was one of the three dinosaurs Richard Owen based the Dinosauria on.

Plesiosaur

Size: 15 metres (about 50 feet)

Weight: 45 tonnes

Plesiosaurs were carnivorous aquatic (mostly marine) reptiles. The common name 'plesiosaur' is applied both to the 'true' plesiosaurs ◀Suborder Plesiosauroidea▶ which includes both long-necked (elasmosaurs) and short-necked (polycotylid) forms and to the larger taxonomic rank of Plesiosauria, which includes the pliosaurs. The pliosaurs were the short-necked, large-headed plesiosaurians that were the apex predators for much of the Mesozoic. There were many species of plesiosaurs, while most of them were not as large as Elasmosaurus.

Mosasaurus

Length: 10 – 18 m
Mass: 14,000 kg

Mosasaurs ◀from Latin 'Mosa' meaning the 'Meuse river' in the Netherlands, and Greek sauros meaning 'lizard'▶ are an extinct group of serpentine marine reptiles that thrived worldwide in the earth's oceans during the Cretaceous Period. The first fossilized remains were discovered in a limestone quarry at Maastricht on the Meuse in 1778, and the first genus of mosasaur, Mosasaurus, was named. These ferocious marine predators are now considered to be the closest relatives of snakes, due to cladistic analysis of symptomatic similarities in jaw and skull anatomies.

Megalosaurus

Length: 9 m
Mass: 1,000 – 3,000 kg

Megalosaurus ◀meaning "Great Lizard"▶ is a genus of large theropod dinosaurs of the Middle Jurassic period (Bathonian stage, 166 million years ago) of Europe (Southern England, France, Portugal). It is significant as the first genus of dinosaur (outside of birds) to be described and named.

Living in what is now Europe, during the Jurassic Period (181 to 169 million years ago), Megalosaurus may have hunted stegosaurs and sauropods. Repeated descriptions of Megalosaurus hunting Iguanodon (another of the earliest dinosaurs named) through the forests that then covered the continent are probably inaccurate, because Iguanodon skeletons are found in much younger Early Cretaceous formations. No fossils assignable to Megalosaurus have been discovered in Africa, contrary to some outdated dinosaur books.

Iguanodon

Length: 10 m (Adult)
Mass: 4,000 – 5,000 kg

Iguanodon ◀meaning "Iguana tooth"▶ is a genus of ornithopod dinosaur that lived roughly halfway between the first of the swift bipedal hypsilophodontids and the ornithopods' culmination in the duck-billed dinosaurs. Many species of Iguanodon have been named, dating from the Kimmeridgian age of the Late Jurassic Period to the Cenomanian age of the Late Cretaceous Period from Asia, Europe, and North America.

Dicynodon

Size: 1.2 metres

Dicynodon ◀"Two Dog-teeth"▶ is a type of dicynodont therapsid that flourished during the Late Permian period. Like all dicynodonts, it was herbivorous. This animal was toothless, except for prominent tusks, hence the name. It probably cropped vegetation with a horny beak, much like a tortoise, while the tusks may have been used for digging up roots and tubers.

Mastodonsaurus

Size: about 4 to 6 metres (13 to 20 ft)

Mastodonsaurus was a large-headed temnospondyl that belonged to a group of advanced, mostly Triassic amphibians called capitosaurs. It was a giant among the stegocephalians and the largest animal of its time ◀Late Triassic, 200 MYA▶. It looked like a huge frog, but instead of being semicircular, as in frogs, its head was triangular and reached 1.25 m. in length.

Teleosaurus

Size: 3 metres (10 ft)

Teleosaurus was an extinct genus of teleosaurid crocodyliform that lived during the Middle Jurassic. Teleosaurus had highly elongate jaws, similar to those of a modern gharial. It had a long, slender, body, with a sinuous tail that would have helped propel it through the water.

Pterodactylus

Wingspan: about 1.04 meters (3 ft 5 in)

Pterodactylus is a genus of pterosaur (the first to be named and identified as a flying reptile) that lived during the late Jurassic Period. It was a carnivore and probably preyed upon fish and other small animals. Like all pterosaurs, the wings of Pterodactylus were formed by a skin and muscle membrane stretching from its elongated fourth finger to its hind limbs. It was supported internally by collagen fibers and externally by keratinous ridges. Fossils have been discovered in Europe and Africa.

Anoplotherium

Size: 2-3 metres tall

Anoplotherium is an extinct genus of herbivorous artiodactyl mammal, possibly belonging to or a close relative of the suborder Tylopoda, which lived in Europe from the Late Eocene to the earliest Oligocene. Fossils of Anoplotherium were first discovered in the gypsum quarries of Paris in 1804 and were subsequently described by French naturalist Georges Cuvier. One of the first Paleogene mammals to be described, 19th Century reconstructions of Anoplotherium can be seen at Crystal Palace Park.

Palaeotherium

Size: around 75cm

Palaeotherium ◀'old beast'▶ is an extinct genus of primitive perissodactyl ungulate. George Cuvier originally described them as being a kind of tapir, and as such, Palaeotherium is popularly reconstructed as a tapir-like animal. Recent reexaminations of the skulls show that the nasal cavity was not designed to support a small trunk, thus starting a recent trend to reconstruct them as looking more horse-like. Recent anatomical studies also suggest that Palaeotherium, along with other palaeothere genera such as Hyracotherium, were closely related to horses.

Megatherium

Size: 20 ft

Megatherium ◀meaning "Great Beast"▶ was a genus of rhino-sized ground sloths endemic to North America that lived from the Pleistocene existing for approximately 5.3 million years. Its size was exceeded by only a few other land mammals, including mammals like Moeritherium and the Entelodon.

Megaloceros giganteus

Size: 7 ft at the shoulder (2.1 meters), with antlers spanning up to 12 ft (3.65 meters)

Megaloceros ◀from Greek: megalos + keras, literally "Great Horn"; see also Lister (1987)▶ is an extinct genus of deer whose members lived throughout Eurasia from the late Pliocene to the Late Pleistocene and were important herbivores during the Ice Ages. The largest species, Megaloceros giganteus, vernacularly known as the "Irish Elk" or "Giant elk", is also the best known.
Most members of the genus were extremely large animals that favoured meadows or open woodlands, with most species averaging slightly below 2 metres at the withers.

Megalania



"Megalania was a large monitor lizard that lived in Australia during the Pleistocene Epoch, about 2.5 million years ago. The massive reptile was about 23 feet (7 meters) long, the size of a Saltwater Crocodile, the largest reptile alive today, making it the largest lizard that ever lived. It also had a venomous bite just like its relative, the Komodo Dragon."


Wow!  :o

Imagine what this chase would be like  :-X



Phobos
Dec 05, 2020, 09:30:57 PM
Reply #1544 on: Dec 05, 2020, 09:30:57 PM
Baryonyx walker


"This dinosaur was a puzzle to scientists because of its teeth, which vary enough between individuals to make scientists consider classifying each individual as its own species. Plus its skull looked more like a crocodile than any other dinosaur scientists had encountered."

Torvosaurus gurneyi


"This carnivorous species originally puzzled scientists when it was discovered in 2014 in Portugal because it resembled a similar North American species. However, the scientists were able to use mouth size and number of teeth to tell them apart. At 33 feet long, this hunter was one of largest carnivores of its time, though not the largest ever."


 

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