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Author Topic: Post Your Collection  (Read 665585 times)

Bat Chain Puller
Oct 08, 2015, 03:16:31 AM
Reply #3150 on: Oct 08, 2015, 03:16:31 AM
Q
To be fair, though, the figure presented here is accurately scaled up by 25% making it a whopping 2 feet tall! 

So yes, it's massive.  MASSIVE! 


I bet it's fair to assume that holding it as an adult will feel very much like holding the original as a child back on Christmas morning 1979.

How much does this thing cost? 25% more than it did in 1979?  :P If only.


windebieste
Oct 08, 2015, 04:54:32 AM
Reply #3151 on: Oct 08, 2015, 04:54:32 AM
Q
Ya.  Definitely feels weird picking up one of those things for the first time.  It almost feels wrong.

It cost too much. Even the price I got it for was just  good fortune.  I got it for AU$479.  So let's see...  that's around US$344.  ...and believe me, that's cheap.  They originally retail from Gentle Giant around the $499 mark.   They are now out of stock on the 24" replica so if you want one now you will be at the mercy of Ebay prices.  The fact that these things are limited edition of only 200 units does not help. 

There were 4 different versions made of the 24" Gentle Giant Jumbo Alien.  The Glow in the dark (250 units) version, the replica version (200 units) and additional gold and silver plated versions as well (79 units apiece). 

I've seen each of these on Ebay at all kinds of prices.  None of them particularly cheap. 

If you want a gold one, here, help yourself to an awesome collectible.



I love the error they have displayed in that image and how they state the figure is 1/6 scale.  Which is wrong and it's closer to 1/4 scale.  This figure is 2' tall.  The alien is about 8' tall.  So quarter scale is more accurate.  At 1/6 scale that would place the Alien at about 12' tall.  Now that's a big Alien. 

Maybe the Creature that appears in 'ALIEN: Isolation' is that big.  After all, those sexy digitigrade legs can do a lot for your height, y'know. lol.

-Windebieste.

« Last Edit: Oct 08, 2015, 05:08:17 AM by windebieste »

windebieste
Oct 15, 2015, 06:33:09 AM
Reply #3152 on: Oct 15, 2015, 06:33:09 AM
Q
Anyway, this fellow arrived yesterday.  Poor thing.  Look at him... just look at him!

Notwithstanding the usual problems these old figures have including the limp arms, loose legs and the mounting slot for the dorsal spike in its back being damaged, it also had it's head snapped at the neck.  Quite a serious piece of damage but I've become familiar with this kind of decapitation and now have a solid handle on how to make a comprehensive and complete repair.

The good News I can fix this easily; and what's more, I'm going to show you how.   ;)

 

The first thing I do is thoroughly clean the figure to remove any dust and dirt that may be present.  In the case of this figure, it was also previously owned by a smoker at some point so a detox bath was necessary to remove as much cigarette contamination  as possible.  To clean the figure thoroughly means disassembling it.  In this case, it needed to be dismantled anyway so I can access the stump that's still secured inside the torso.  The stump is held in place by one of the 4 screws in the figures back.  It will fall free naturally once all the screws are removed.  Let's not worry about such details and just concentrate on getting the busted head back where it belongs, though, shall we?

While the disassembled figure is outside drying in the Sun, I cut a small mounting plate from an old DVD case.  It's easy material to work with and the plastic is ideal to make the repairs needed.  Especially if I use a section of the case that has some ridging on it that will provide additional strength to the plate. 

I drill 4 holes in both the neck stump and the improvised plate, making sure that the screw heads will sit flush on the surface of the stump and that the screws are straight and parallel when fitting into the plate to avoid them interfering with the internal mechanism that operates the jaw.  We don't want the screws to damage that internal mechanism.

Long screws are required because the plate won't just fit into the cavity.  It will have to be inserted at an angle with the screws present and the long screws will permit adequate manipulation for this to happen.  It's hard to explain, but trust me, the long screws provide the necessary range of motion needed to get the plate inside the head.




Now the plate is fully inserted and manipulated into place.  From this point it's just a matter of tightening the screws.  This is done evenly for each screw in turn so that the plate sits straight and doesn't slip out of alignment inside the head.  It's an easy process.   Once the screws are tightened, there won't be any slippage and both the head and stump pieces will be secured together permanently:




Now the screws are completely holding the 2 pieces together.  They have to be tight to seal the gap and make the piece whole again but not so tight that they strip the plastic mounting plate inside the head.   I have found that 4 screws are optimum and deliver excellent results when done correctly.   The break is hardly even detectable.   The break itself provides a natural alignment for the 2 pieces to match once again so that the repair is made that little bit easier.   




Cleaned and fully assembled the figure looks terrific!  You wouldn't even know it was ever broken.   Some additional work to tension the arms so they hold a pose, tighten up the legs and make sure the spike on the back stays in place completes the figure.   Altogether a job well done:




Normally I like to buy the most degraded, beaten up figures I can find and restore them - if they're not too pricey.  This one was ideal and reasonably priced.  It had a serious break that significantly degraded it but fortunately it was repairable.  It also included the all too frequently missing parts, the carapace and dorsal spike which was a fantastic bonus. 

With some care and attention to detail this little project came together extremely well and it looks absolutely awesome once again.

-Windebieste.

« Last Edit: Oct 26, 2015, 07:32:10 AM by windebieste »

Darwinsgirl
Oct 16, 2015, 07:50:58 PM
Reply #3153 on: Oct 16, 2015, 07:50:58 PM
Q

5 Star tutorial!  8) Question....what do you use to clean the figure?

 I have one of these and it doesn't look as good as this.


windebieste
Oct 17, 2015, 07:32:38 AM
Reply #3154 on: Oct 17, 2015, 07:32:38 AM
Q
Ha.  Thank you.  :)

As far as cleaning goes, if all you have to deal with is surface dust and light dirt then soapy water, a sponge and an old toothbrush in the kitchen sink is a good way to clean one of these figures.   There's a lot of rich detail on the figure that can accumulate dust so the toothbrush is ideal for getting into all small spaces found all over it's body. 

These figures tend to be a bit ungainly to handle while cleaning them with their arms, legs and tail flopping about as you tend to it.  If you like, you can remove the 4 screws in the back of the figure and disassemble it.  Put the 4 screws aside for reassembling later and toss all the loose body pieces into the sink and let them soak as you scrub each piece individually with the toothbrush.


Probably his first bath in over 35 years.  Possibly, his first bath ever!

Of course, you don't have to perform a complete tear down of the figure just to wash it. 

I like to do so because the figures I deal with tend to have other prominent issues that require disassembling in order to address them.  While it's in pieces for repair it's a good opportunity to wash the figure.  In my opinion, it's easier handling the separated pieces in the sink than it is to wash the figure whole.  They also tend to dry quicker if disassembled, too.


A pair of figures drying in the sun.   The dismantled figure on the left is the same decapitated figure in my previous post above.

Some of the figures I've handled have been in a disgusting state, covered in dirt and dust and generally in poor condition.  Usually a good bath solves most of the problems.  Other issues like stains and restoring painted figures really need a case by case assessment with more aggressive approach using chemicals and equally more care. 

-Windebieste.

...speaking of figures in a disgusting state, here's one for you that looks like it's been buried for most of it's life and it's been waiting for Indiana Jones to dig it up.  This particular figure also appears in pieces in the photo posted above.  It's the dismantled one on the right spread out and enjoying the sunny day on the cable drum. 

It's unusual head paint pattern is discernible in that photo, too.   The beauty of this particular figure is it possesses an anomaly in its head paint pattern.  It has a line painted across his eye socket where no paint would normally appear which makes the Before and After comparison shots easy to compare.   

Anyway, this is what the poor Sod looked like when he arrived in the mail.  Gah...:


My, don't you look like the regular pigpen? 

Actually, that's the name I gave him in my log book, 'Pigpen', named after the 'Peanuts' comic character.  This guy was super dirty and had a number of other problems including the very worn chrome finish on his teeth. Oh, and a broken hip joint as well.  Each of these issues have since been addressed and he now looks great; but let's just concentrate on his filthy countenance. 

Here's a couple of Before and After closeups.  Firstly, there's no denying this guy needs a bath.  Look at that face!  He looks like he's been cleaning chimneys, or something:


"Son, what's that shit you've got all over your face?  You look disgusting.  Now, go take a shower!"

He was fully disassembled, placed in the kitchen sink and scrubbed.  The power of ye ol' toothbrush is not to be under estimated!  Aside from that, I didn't use anything more complicated than hot water and a mild kitchen detergent to clean all the dirt, dust, pet hair (it was REALLY DISGUSTING.  lol.) and whatever muck was coating the figure.  It worked out well and here it is, all cleaned up: 


"Ahhh, yeah.  That's much better, now.  Too bad we can't wash those bloodstains outta yer forehead."

Most of the dirt was easily removed during the washing up process but some stubborn red marks refused to respond to my efforts, so I just left them there.  They don't seriously detract from the figure and won't be too noticible once I get around to placing a fresh carapace on his head.  So I really don't want to risk damaging the paint work on the figure.  I  have to draw the line somewhere and I'm not going to attempt using nail polish remover or paint stripper on the figure.  It's just not worth the gamble to ruin the rest of the original paint work.  Nonetheless, it's a vast improvement over the state it was in when it arrived.

The end result?  Totally worth it.

-Windebieste.

« Last Edit: Oct 18, 2015, 02:19:55 AM by windebieste »

azeemurill
Oct 18, 2015, 03:14:20 AM
Reply #3155 on: Oct 18, 2015, 03:14:20 AM
Q
Finally posting my collection. Photos are a bit out of date at this point, and I've got a few things since, but this is the majority of my collection.


1st Shelf - 1st Cupboard — AVP Chess Set: Aliens, McFarlane 12" Grid Alien, McFarlane 12" Cloaked Scar Predator , McFarlane 12" Scar Predator and AVP Chess Set: Predators.

2nd Shelf - 1st Cupboard — McFarlane: Aliens, Predator + AVP.

3rd Shelf - 1st Cupboard — Kenner Aliens.

4th Shelf - 1st Cupboard — AVP HorrorClix, Predator Skull, Alien, Aliens + Predator MezItz, Aliens/Predator/AVP Books, Alien Trilogy VHS Set, and Predator 1/2 VHS

5th Shelf - 1st Cupboard — Aliens, Predator + AVP Graphic Novels, Aliens, Predator + AVP Comics, LE AVP DVD Set and Aliens Predator CCG.

Top - 2nd Cupboard — Assorted Aliens/Predator Items

1st Shelf - 2nd Cupboard —Hot Toys 14" Elder Predator, McFarlane 12" Alien and Hot Toys 16" AVP Alien.

2nd Shelf - 2nd Cupboard —McFarlane AVP Series 2.

3rd Shelf - 2nd Cupboard —Kenner Predator.

4th Shelf - 2nd Cupboard —THK Aliens Playset




Elmazalman
Oct 18, 2015, 08:25:47 PM
Reply #3158 on: Oct 18, 2015, 08:25:47 PM
Q
Ha.  Thank you.  :)

As far as cleaning goes, if all you have to deal with is surface dust and light dirt then soapy water, a sponge and an old toothbrush in the kitchen sink is a good way to clean one of these figures.   There's a lot of rich detail on the figure that can accumulate dust so the toothbrush is ideal for getting into all small spaces found all over it's body. 

These figures tend to be a bit ungainly to handle while cleaning them with their arms, legs and tail flopping about as you tend to it.  If you like, you can remove the 4 screws in the back of the figure and disassemble it.  Put the 4 screws aside for reassembling later and toss all the loose body pieces into the sink and let them soak as you scrub each piece individually with the toothbrush.


Probably his first bath in over 35 years.  Possibly, his first bath ever!

Of course, you don't have to perform a complete tear down of the figure just to wash it. 

I like to do so because the figures I deal with tend to have other prominent issues that require disassembling in order to address them.  While it's in pieces for repair it's a good opportunity to wash the figure.  In my opinion, it's easier handling the separated pieces in the sink than it is to wash the figure whole.  They also tend to dry quicker if disassembled, too.


A pair of figures drying in the sun.   The dismantled figure on the left is the same decapitated figure in my previous post above.

Some of the figures I've handled have been in a disgusting state, covered in dirt and dust and generally in poor condition.  Usually a good bath solves most of the problems.  Other issues like stains and restoring painted figures really need a case by case assessment with more aggressive approach using chemicals and equally more care. 

-Windebieste.

...speaking of figures in a disgusting state, here's one for you that looks like it's been buried for most of it's life and it's been waiting for Indiana Jones to dig it up.  This particular figure also appears in pieces in the photo posted above.  It's the dismantled one on the right spread out and enjoying the sunny day on the cable drum. 

It's unusual head paint pattern is discernible in that photo, too.   The beauty of this particular figure is it possesses an anomaly in its head paint pattern.  It has a line painted across his eye socket where no paint would normally appear which makes the Before and After comparison shots easy to compare.   

Anyway, this is what the poor Sod looked like when he arrived in the mail.  Gah...:


My, don't you look like the regular pigpen? 

Actually, that's the name I gave him in my log book, 'Pigpen', named after the 'Peanuts' comic character.  This guy was super dirty and had a number of other problems including the very worn chrome finish on his teeth. Oh, and a broken hip joint as well.  Each of these issues have since been addressed and he now looks great; but let's just concentrate on his filthy countenance. 

Here's a couple of Before and After closeups.  Firstly, there's no denying this guy needs a bath.  Look at that face!  He looks like he's been cleaning chimneys, or something:


"Son, what's that shit you've got all over your face?  You look disgusting.  Now, go take a shower!"

He was fully disassembled, placed in the kitchen sink and scrubbed.  The power of ye ol' toothbrush is not to be under estimated!  Aside from that, I didn't use anything more complicated than hot water and a mild kitchen detergent to clean all the dirt, dust, pet hair (it was REALLY DISGUSTING.  lol.) and whatever muck was coating the figure.  It worked out well and here it is, all cleaned up: 


"Ahhh, yeah.  That's much better, now.  Too bad we can't wash those bloodstains outta yer forehead."

Most of the dirt was easily removed during the washing up process but some stubborn red marks refused to respond to my efforts, so I just left them there.  They don't seriously detract from the figure and won't be too noticible once I get around to placing a fresh carapace on his head.  So I really don't want to risk damaging the paint work on the figure.  I  have to draw the line somewhere and I'm not going to attempt using nail polish remover or paint stripper on the figure.  It's just not worth the gamble to ruin the rest of the original paint work.  Nonetheless, it's a vast improvement over the state it was in when it arrived.

The end result?  Totally worth it.

-Windebieste.
Interesting tutorial,thanks for that.I,myself have little or no patience for repair work-having recently binned a large 2008 NECA Alien figure because of a foot snapped off at the ankle-a relatively easy problem to fix compared to the surgery you've performed on your grateful patients.


windebieste
Oct 18, 2015, 09:49:12 PM
Reply #3159 on: Oct 18, 2015, 09:49:12 PM
Q
Interesting tutorial,thanks for that.I,myself have little or no patience for repair work-having recently binned a large 2008 NECA Alien figure because of a foot snapped off [...]

NOOOOOOOOOOOOOoooooooooooooooooooooooooo...  Are you serious?  Do you still have it..? 

Here's $20 for it.  That is, if you can still fish it out of the bin either with or without the broken foot:



But seriously, yes.  My love for these older figures is becoming borderline obsessive as well as an unsustainably expensive and barely restrained passion.  I love these old Kenner Aliens.   After all, what kind of Dedicated Fan would I be if I didn't demonstrate some manner of compulsive and irrational adoration for my ugly old toys?  lol.

EDiT

Oh, ...and yeah.  That's a mighty fine and eclectic collection you have there, azeemurill.  That's a  terrific range of figures and it contrasts highly with my own.  In a very aweome way.   Whereas I've selected to embrace a very specialised single area* you have taken it upon yourself to be diverse in the extreme with your choice.  Good job, I say.  I love seeing massive collections like this.  You've got good reason to be proud of it and on top of that, it makes me feel like I'm not (too) weird after all. 

Thanks for sharing.

-Windebieste.

*Actually, I do own a few 7" NECAs, McFarlanes and a number of other stuffz; but my collection of 1979 Kenner (and other 'related') Alien items easily outnumber them. 

« Last Edit: Oct 18, 2015, 10:43:17 PM by windebieste »

Elmazalman
Oct 19, 2015, 05:47:54 AM
Reply #3160 on: Oct 19, 2015, 05:47:54 AM
Q
Interesting tutorial,thanks for that.I,myself have little or no patience for repair work-having recently binned a large 2008 NECA Alien figure because of a foot snapped off [...]

NOOOOOOOOOOOOOoooooooooooooooooooooooooo...  Are you serious?  Do you still have it..? 

Here's $20 for it.  That is, if you can still fish it out of the bin either with or without the broken foot:



But seriously, yes.  My love for these older figures is becoming borderline obsessive as well as an unsustainably expensive and barely restrained passion.  I love these old Kenner Aliens.   After all, what kind of Dedicated Fan would I be if I didn't demonstrate some manner of compulsive and irrational adoration for my ugly old toys?  lol.

EDiT

Oh, ...and yeah.  That's a mighty fine and eclectic collection you have there, azeemurill.  That's a  terrific range of figures and it contrasts highly with my own.  In a very aweome way.   Whereas I've selected to embrace a very specialised single area* you have taken it upon yourself to be diverse in the extreme with your choice.  Good job, I say.  I love seeing massive collections like this.  You've got good reason to be proud of it and on top of that, it makes me feel like I'm not (too) weird after all. 

Thanks for sharing.

-Windebieste.

*Actually, I do own a few 7" NECAs, McFarlanes and a number of other stuffz; but my collection of 1979 Kenner (and other 'related') Alien items easily outnumber them.
Do you collect figures only or model kits also?My favourite piece that i own is a mint condition factory sealed original MPC Alien figure from 1979.I've always adored the box-art,water colour(?)painting of the creature.It set me back $135.00 AU(in 1998),but it was worth it!


windebieste
Oct 19, 2015, 10:02:03 AM
Reply #3161 on: Oct 19, 2015, 10:02:03 AM
Q
Ya.  I know the one you mean.  It's a nice kit and it does have cool box art.   You are correct and it was originally published back in 1979.  It was then republished soon after in 1984.  It was then again republished as recently as 2013. 



The one on the left is the recent 2013 repressing and is still easily found at a decent price.  The right one is the original from 1979.

In 1984, Tsukuda Hobby also published their own figure of the of the Alien and it was deplorable.  Worst figure ever and it felt more like a kit than a figure. So yes, worst kit/figure  EVER.  The box art used the 'ALIEN' name emblazoned across the top of the box and it displayed exactly the same lettering, color and style as the MPC kit title.   Off hand, I don't know of any other use of the MPC white bordered green box title art anywhere else.   I'll have to do some more research regarding that design choice.

Anyway, just compare the box art of Tsukuda Hobby's 1984 release to the MPC items posted above:



Too many weird things about this so called 'kit'.  Too many...

So let's take a closer look at this oddity, shall we?  The title on the box is exactly the same as the one displayed on the earlier MPC version.  The figure/kit within the box was itself distributed in an almost complete state and was almost fully assembled.  Almost.   In order to complete the figure, you had to attach the hands, the flexible wire core tail and the ill fitting carapace pieces onto the figure.  Job done.  It's the most dodgy vinyl kit/action figure you can imagine.  The other outstanding feature is no less astonishing.  It's a remolding of the 1979 Kenner action figure.  Finally, the thing is not 'OVER 18 INCHES TALL' as declared on the box.  It more accurately measures in at 17 3/4 inches.  A full inch shorter than the original Kenner action figure on which it is derived.  It's a very weird item.  Very very weird.

So why did Tsukuda repurpose the title graphic from the MPC box art; and then, instead of using the MPC pressing, use a butchered up version of the 1979 Kenner action figure as the basis for the 'kit' inside?   I don't know.  This is one question I'm attempting to seek an answer to but haven't had any leads.   Not yet, anyway.   Either way, the Tsukuda Hobby figure is one of several strange and anomalous figures/kits based on the old Kenner figure to see release between 1984 and 1997.



For your judgment: (Left) 1984 Tsukuda Hobby figure.  (Right) 1979 Kenner Products action figure.

I swear, the more I find out about the stuff that was released in 1979 and the years soon thereafter, the stranger and more compelling it all becomes.

-Windebieste.


« Last Edit: Oct 19, 2015, 10:44:13 AM by windebieste »


Elmazalman
Oct 19, 2015, 10:36:39 AM
Reply #3163 on: Oct 19, 2015, 10:36:39 AM
Q
Ya.  I know the one you mean.  It's a nice kit and it does have cool box art.   You are correct and it was originally published back in 1979.  It was then republished soon after in 1984.  It was then again republished as recently as 2013. 



The one on the left is the recent 2013 repressing and is still easily found at a decent price.  The right one is the original from 1979.

In 1984, Tsukuda Hobby also published their own deplorable kit of the Alien.  Worst kit ever.  EVER.  The box art for their kit used the 'ALIEN' name emblazoned upon the box and it displayed exactly the same lettering, color and style as the MPC kit.   Off hand, I don't know of any other use of the MPC white bordered green box title art anywhere else.   I'll have to do some more research regarding that design choice.

Anyway, just compare the box art of Tsukuda Hobby's 1984 release to the MPC items posted above:



Too many weird things about this so called 'kit'.  Too many...

The title on the box is exactly the same as the one displayed on the earlier MPC version.  The kit within the box was itself distributed in an almost complete state and fully assemble.  You just have to assemble the hands, the wire core tail and ill fitting carapace pieces onto the figure.  Job done.  It's the most dodgy vinyl kit.  The other outstanding feature of the  kit itself is no less astonishing.  It's a remolding of the 1979 Kenner action figure.  Finally, the kit itself is not 'OVER 18 INCHES TALL'.  It's 17 3/4 inches.  A full inch shorter than the original Kenner action figure.  It's very weird.  Very very weird.

So why did Tsukuda repurpose the title graphic from the MPC box art; and then, instead of using the MPC pressing, use a butchered up version of the 1979 Kenner action figure as the basis for the 'kit' inside?   I don't know.  This is one question I'm attempting to seek an answer to but haven't had any leads.  Not yet, anyway.   Either way, the Tsukuda Hobby kit is one of several strange and anomalous 'kits' based on the old Kenner figure to see release between 1984 and 1997.



For your judgment: (Left) 1984 Tsukuda Hobby kit.  (Right) 1979 Kenner Products action figure.

I swear, the more I find out about the stuff released in 1979 and the years soon thereafter, the stranger and more compelling it all becomes.

-Windebieste.
Looking at my copy of MODEL and TOY Collector#17 WINTER 1991 the MPC kit was apparently issued twice:
first edition-with jaws(i have this edition).
second edition-without.

The title graphic for the Tsukuda looks like they did borrow it from the earlier MPC kit.

The MPC kit was re-issued in 1999-this time by AMT/ERTL for the 20th anniversary of the film,with inferior box art.

« Last Edit: Oct 19, 2015, 10:40:06 AM by Elmazalman »

windebieste
Oct 19, 2015, 11:12:22 AM
Reply #3164 on: Oct 19, 2015, 11:12:22 AM
Q
So the MPC kit was issued at least 4 times.   Wow.  I'm not surprised about the 1999 reissue.  Do you have a photo of it?   I know there was also an English/French Canadian version of it released as well.  I think that one also appeared in 1979.

That second edition you mention might be the 1984 release. 

These are the ones I have.  Only the 2013 version is still sealed in its original plastic:



EDiT

Sorry, I meant to mention a few things. 

- As you can see, both the 1979 and 1984 versions both have the copyright information and date of publication just below the title.  The 2013 release possesses no such information in this location. 

- Also of note is the product number on each of these kits.  The 1979 and 1984 kits both share the same Product No.:  1-1961.  It's the same on both boxes.  The 2013 edition has a different Product No.:  MPC793/12.

-Windebieste.




...later that same evening...

Er... yeah.  I see what you mean.  The original package is a whole lot better.  The AMT box art is definitely not an improvement.  It's kinda lurid, actually. lol:




Here's an image of the Canadian English/French edition.  The Product No., if you're interested, is Q1-1961




Also, I'm seeing some information about a Kaiyodo re-issue as well while searching with Google.  There's not a lot to go on, but it appears to be an oversized version from Japan.   I certainly don't know anything about this item.  One thing for sure, though, the Japanese sure get away with doing weird stuff for some strange reason:



So yes.  Aside from the original pressing, it looks like it's been reissued several times during the past three and a half decades. 

-Windebieste.

« Last Edit: Oct 19, 2015, 12:24:53 PM by windebieste »

 

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