Predator vision and their society

Started by Accaris, Oct 10, 2007, 01:47:15 PM

Author
Predator vision and their society (Read 2,939 times)

Accaris

Accaris

#15
Quote from: Vemados on Oct 10, 2007, 11:24:29 PM
Hey Accaris why does your description of normal Predator vision sound almost exactly like one of my posts?

Because I must have missed it while skimming over the 100 random search results for "predator vision?"

Accaris

Accaris

#16
Quote from: Vemados on Oct 10, 2007, 11:48:06 PM
Quote from: Miker25 on Oct 10, 2007, 11:35:26 PM
Quote from: Vemados on Oct 10, 2007, 11:24:29 PM
I think the Preds see like we do, and the infared vision in the first two movies are a sideaffect of wearing the mask for a while and that given enough time it would slowly return to the visible spectrum.

Yeah kind of like when our eyes adjust to darkness or light

Yeah, but more like when we look at a bright light and there's a colored spot on our vision for a while.

I think this explanation is a good compromise. I'm going to use it from now on!

Munkeywrench

Quote from: Accaris on Oct 11, 2007, 12:26:10 PM
Quote from: Vemados on Oct 10, 2007, 11:48:06 PM
Quote from: Miker25 on Oct 10, 2007, 11:35:26 PM
Quote from: Vemados on Oct 10, 2007, 11:24:29 PM
I think the Preds see like we do, and the infared vision in the first two movies are a sideaffect of wearing the mask for a while and that given enough time it would slowly return to the visible spectrum.

Yeah kind of like when our eyes adjust to darkness or light

Yeah, but more like when we look at a bright light and there's a colored spot on our vision for a while.

I think this explanation is a good compromise. I'm going to use it from now on!

I like this theory

Kriszilla

Humans can't possibly understand on any level what Infr-Red vision is really like. It's like trying to imagine a new colour, you just can't do it. The vision in the films is just a representation for us, in reality their vision may be much more sensitive, able to detect even miniscule differences between temperatures. This cannot be achieved with current technology, but I am willing to believe that Predator vision is far more sensitive than most people think.

The Necronoir

Quote from: Kriszilla on Oct 11, 2007, 07:15:27 PM
Humans can't possibly understand on any level what Infr-Red vision is really like. It's like trying to imagine a new colour, you just can't do it. The vision in the films is just a representation for us, in reality their vision may be much more sensitive, able to detect even miniscule differences between temperatures. This cannot be achieved with current technology, but I am willing to believe that Predator vision is far more sensitive than most people think.
Precisely, you've hit the nail on the head. The same goes for documentaries which try to represent other modes of vision, such as what a bee, with it's compound eyes, sees. When we look at such a representation we find it hopelessly bewildering, but that's just because our minds aren't wired to be able to comprehend data in that medium.

The idea that using the mask causes the predator's vision to alter is, quite simply, ridiculous. Spec-Ops soldiers who use nightvision goggles frequently don't have a 'hangover' period where they can miraculously see in the dark.

Alienseseses

Maybe it's like nearsighted- farsighted

In Predator, he is nearsighted, sees all red, needs the mask to blue it.
P2, he sees allways blue-ish, 20-20.
AVP- farsighted. Always red because that is what their eyes are used to.

But I think they see infra-red. Didn't Keyes say so, too?

'Course, what does he know.

Vemados

Vemados

#21
Quote from: The Necronoir on Oct 12, 2007, 12:35:12 AM
Quote from: Kriszilla on Oct 11, 2007, 07:15:27 PM
Humans can't possibly understand on any level what Infr-Red vision is really like. It's like trying to imagine a new colour, you just can't do it. The vision in the films is just a representation for us, in reality their vision may be much more sensitive, able to detect even miniscule differences between temperatures. This cannot be achieved with current technology, but I am willing to believe that Predator vision is far more sensitive than most people think.
Precisely, you've hit the nail on the head. The same goes for documentaries which try to represent other modes of vision, such as what a bee, with it's compound eyes, sees. When we look at such a representation we find it hopelessly bewildering, but that's just because our minds aren't wired to be able to comprehend data in that medium.

The idea that using the mask causes the predator's vision to alter is, quite simply, ridiculous. Spec-Ops soldiers who use nightvision goggles frequently don't have a 'hangover' period where they can miraculously see in the dark.

When was the last time you looked through a Predator's mask?  How do you know they get infared vision the same way we do?

The Necronoir

Quote from: Vemados on Oct 12, 2007, 02:02:01 AM
When was the last time you looked through a Predator's mask?  How do you know they get infared vision the same way we do?
That's exactly what I'm saying... they don't. What we see in the films is a representation of what the predator sees, not its actual vision.

Accaris

Accaris

#23
Quote
The idea that using the mask causes the predator's vision to alter is, quite simply, ridiculous. Spec-Ops soldiers who use nightvision goggles frequently don't have a 'hangover' period where they can miraculously see in the dark.

Spec ops soldiers are also human beings, not bizarre aliens from some other side of the galaxy with physiology that no one really understands or can explain.

I think any reasonable speculation about Predator vision is acceptable, simply because the information about it isn't conclusive. I still like Vemados' theory, maybe modified a bit. Maybe their retinas have a kind of photoluminescence, where if they are exposed to a certain wavelength, the Predator's perception changes for like 10 minutes and then slowly returns to normal (like photo film.) Their blood is biolluminescent, so maybe the same principle in their eyes affects their vision.

AvPGalaxy: About | Contact | Cookie Policy | Manage Cookie Settings | Privacy Policy | Legal Info
Facebook Twitter Instagram YouTube Patreon RSS Feed
Contact: General Queries | Submit News