Favourite Stephen King adaptations?

Started by gameoverman, Jul 09, 2008, 04:37:41 PM

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Favourite Stephen King adaptations? (Read 13,024 times)

echobbase79

Quote from: Valaquen on Oct 03, 2011, 08:04:07 AM
Quote from: TheMonolith on Oct 02, 2011, 11:25:55 PM
Quote from: StrangeShape on Oct 02, 2011, 05:52:26 PM
I changed my mind a lot about King when I saw what HIS vision is. Maxium Overdirve, 97 The Shining...and most of the adaptations where he is heavily involved and writes screenplays for. Theyre all like Nickelodeon halloween shows. The adaptations of his stories are imo far superior to how he envisions it (Most of the time). Heck, I myself invisioned most of his books as much more terrifying and scary than what he does in his own projects, and thats coming from an old big King fan who read most of his books. Best example is Shining. Im still disturbed and terrified by Kubrick's version. The heartbeat in some scenes, the dread, the mysteries, the cheeling noises, the feel etc. The 97 Shining I like and own on dvd but it feels like a fun halloween ghost movie for teenagers
King himself says Maximum Overdrive is bad.
He was coked out his head when he filmed it and was sued for almost killing someone.

Yeah, I heard the crew hated working for him. He admits to not knowing what the hell he was doing.   :D Still love the movie though.


Gilfryd

Top 5 -
Carrie (De Palma)
The Shining (Kubrick)
Creepshow (Romero)
The Dead Zone (Cronenberg)
Christine (Carpenter)

I also enjoy the films of Rob Reiner (Stand by Me, Misery) and Frank Darabont (The Shawshank Redemption, The Green Mile, The Mist).

The original Pet Sematary by Mary Lambert also scared the hell out of me as a kid.

ace3g

ace3g

#109

Nightmare Asylum

Of the King adaptations I've seen, I've liked:

Carrie (1976, Brian De Palma)
The Shining (1980, Stanley Kubrick)
Christine (1983, John Carpenter)
Misery (1990, Rob Reiner)
The Shawshank Redemption (1994, Frank Darabont)
The Mist (2007, Frank Darabont)

And I have not liked:

Children of the Corn (1984, Fritz Kiersch)
Pet Sematary (1989, Mary Lambert)
It (1990, Tommy Lee Wallace)
It (2017, Andy Muschietti)
It: Chapter Two (2019, Andy Muschietti)

The only King I've ever actually read is The Mist.

I think that It has an interesting core concept, but the various adaptations - and the central story itself - do not at all live up to that concept; I also think that the concept is held back an incredible amount by the fact that the story is just so damn beholden to the idea of Pennywise taking always defaulting to the form of a clown. I haven't read the novel, but I'm going to assume based on the adaptations that the novel also doesn't do justice to the actual ideas at It's core, either. Tim Curry does give a good performance, though, and that's about all I can say that's good about any of the iterations of It.

choccy milk

Only one real answer:


BigDaddyJohn

Christine, The Green Mile, Shawshank Redemption and The Mist were all amazing.

And despite what King had to say about it, Shining's a masterpiece.

Also have a soft spot (mostly because of nostalgia) for Silver Bullet, although it being vastly inferior to the ones mentioned above.

nanison

Some lesser known or loved films that I loved are sometimes they come back and thinner.

Nightmare Asylum

Quote from: Nightmare Asylum on Sep 16, 2022, 01:26:53 AMOf the King adaptations I've seen, I've liked:

Carrie (1976, Brian De Palma)
The Shining (1980, Stanley Kubrick)
Christine (1983, John Carpenter)
Misery (1990, Rob Reiner)
The Shawshank Redemption (1994, Frank Darabont)
The Mist (2007, Frank Darabont)

And I have not liked:

Children of the Corn (1984, Fritz Kiersch)
Pet Sematary (1989, Mary Lambert)
It (1990, Tommy Lee Wallace)
It (2017, Andy Muschietti)
It: Chapter Two (2019, Andy Muschietti)

The only King I've ever actually read is The Mist.

I think that It has an interesting core concept, but the various adaptations - and the central story itself - do not at all live up to that concept; I also think that the concept is held back an incredible amount by the fact that the story is just so damn beholden to the idea of Pennywise taking always defaulting to the form of a clown. I haven't read the novel, but I'm going to assume based on the adaptations that the novel also doesn't do justice to the actual ideas at It's core, either. Tim Curry does give a good performance, though, and that's about all I can say that's good about any of the iterations of It.

Creepshow has now earned a slot on the good list.

BigDaddyJohn

I must add Needful Things and The Night Flier. Fun unpretentious little movies.

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