ALIEN: The Weyland-Yutani Report (S.D. Perry, 160 pages)

Started by Cvalda, Nov 23, 2013, 05:33:45 AM

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ALIEN: The Weyland-Yutani Report (S.D. Perry, 160 pages) (Read 299,430 times)

TheBATMAN

I'm still not getting these 'flaws' you speak of. By the time frame the book is written Wey-Yu own the Colonial Marines so they will have extensive access to their military archives, so when detailing the incident on LV-426 in 2179 I'm not really understanding why they wouldn't demonstrate the effectiveness of the weapons of that era.

What weapons are missing exactly? The stuff from Resurrection that the pirates use? Why would they feature in a Wey-Yu book?

Doctor Ash

Doctor Ash

#2041
@Locusta: Because you hinted in your book which is great by the way that eggs could be created by a single drone as shown in Alien DC,  i would like to ask you for your theory how it exactly happens.

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SM

Quote from: TheBATMAN on Apr 30, 2017, 01:29:27 PM
I'm still not getting these 'flaws' you speak of. By the time frame the book is written Wey-Yu own the Colonial Marines so they will have extensive access to their military archives, so when detailing the incident on LV-426 in 2179 I'm not really understanding why they wouldn't demonstrate the effectiveness of the weapons of that era.

What weapons are missing exactly? The stuff from Resurrection that the pirates use? Why would they feature in a Wey-Yu book?

The Company didn't own the USCM at that point.

Xenomrph

Quote from: TheBATMAN on Apr 30, 2017, 01:29:27 PM
I'm still not getting these 'flaws' you speak of. By the time frame the book is written Wey-Yu own the Colonial Marines so they will have extensive access to their military archives, so when detailing the incident on LV-426 in 2179 I'm not really understanding why they wouldn't demonstrate the effectiveness of the weapons of that era.

What weapons are missing exactly? The stuff from Resurrection that the pirates use? Why would they feature in a Wey-Yu book?
The book frames the Pulse Rifle as being the all-time greatest Alien-killing weapon, despite the weapon being used, like, once (in 'Aliens') and being literally 200+ years out of date by the timeframe the book is meant to take place.

If they had framed it as "this is one of the vintage guns of that era", that'd be one thing. But instead the book straight up describes the Pulse Rifle as the All-Time Ultimate Weapon. I'd get specific quotes but I don't have my copy of the WY Report unpacked yet.

As for missing weapons, the Lacrima-99 and Draco Double Burner come to mind. I'm pretty sure they get mentioned, but they get nowhere near the level of attention and detail that the Pulse Rifle gets. It feels like fan-service, and according to the author, that was on purpose. The Pulse Rifle gets more focus because it's the gun everyone remembers and likes, from the movie everyone likes.

TheBATMAN

The pulse rifle probably is - based on records available of xenomorph encounters. Again your are being extremely nit-pickety here. The weapons from Resurrection were poor in comparison and again were not W-Y tech anyway so unlikely to receive comprehensive coverage in this book. Considering most books of this type are 'fan service' I don't think it matters in the slightest.

Xenomrph

Quote from: TheBATMAN on May 01, 2017, 09:01:31 AM
The pulse rifle probably is - based on records available of xenomorph encounters. Again your are being extremely nit-pickety here. The weapons from Resurrection were poor in comparison and again were not W-Y tech anyway so unlikely to receive comprehensive coverage in this book. Considering most books of this type are 'fan service' I don't think it matters in the slightest.
The pulse rifle isn't WY tech either, and it's a 200 year old gun.
We don't know what the Resurrection weapons are like because we don't see them in action and we know next to nothing about them. :P

My point is that if the book wasn't being fan-service-centric, there'd have been better ways to frame the pulse rifle (and other things) as being The Best Ever while still being an in-universe document. Taken strictly as an in-universe document, the presentation is pretty lacking, often cotnradictory, and doesn't really have a lot of reasoning behind it. Framed as a fan-supplement book whose focus is the popular movies and the things fans like, the presentation makes a lot more sense.

Local Trouble

Does the death of Alien 5 mean we can finally stick a fork in the derelict too?

Xenomrph

Quote from: Local Trouble on May 02, 2017, 02:58:34 AM
Does the death of Alien 5 mean we can finally stick a fork in the derelict too?
No, why would it?

TheBATMAN

Quote from: SM on Apr 30, 2017, 08:32:08 PM
The Company didn't own the USCM at that point.

I know they didn't, hence why I said at the time the book was written.

Quote from: Xenomrph on May 02, 2017, 02:29:40 AM
The pulse rifle isn't WY tech either, and it's a 200 year old gun.
We don't know what the Resurrection weapons are like because we don't see them in action and we know next to nothing about them. :P

My point is that if the book wasn't being fan-service-centric, there'd have been better ways to frame the pulse rifle (and other things) as being The Best Ever while still being an in-universe document. Taken strictly as an in-universe document, the presentation is pretty lacking, often cotnradictory, and doesn't really have a lot of reasoning behind it. Framed as a fan-supplement book whose focus is the popular movies and the things fans like, the presentation makes a lot more sense.

The pulse rifle technically is at the time the book was written, and regardless they have access to extensive archives on the weapon, what of it? In documented encounters with the Alien it is hailed as the best ever because from what we do know it was the most effective. No issue there. A few posts back you wanted to argue a case for the resurrection weapons but now seemingly admit we know nothing about them.

I fail to see what supplementary books are not written with 'fan-service' in mind. This is nit-picking to the extreme.

gantarat

Will we get another in-universe report book after alien covenant ?

SM

Not any time soon.

tuskhaus

I finally made it all the way through this thread. It was.. an experience.

That being said, the Weyland Yutani Report is essential to any fan's Alien lit collection. Absolutely beautifully brought together, guys. Bravo.

I love that it was written from the point of view of the company, and how the point of view become a bit snarky when talking about the USM and the events surrounding Resurrection.

Also, I noticed the character backgrounds in Prometheus' section tried to explain why some of the members made the poor choices they did. And because the company acknowledged that poor choices were made, I created my own head canon that I kinda stick with to justify why people like Fifield and Milburn were hired in the first place. I've posted this theory elsewhere, but I keep it in my notes app to just pose the question in the future.

Why does Millburn handle the Hammerpede the way he does? Why do some characters seem to lack common sense? We all know Vickers didn't necessarily adore her father to any extent. Understandably so, considering Weyland's non-remorseful words of "David is the son I never had."

The Weyland-Yutani Report states Vickers was personally responsible for choosing the entire crew of the Prometheus, save for Shaw, Holloway, and of course David who were chosen by Weyland.

Seeing as Vickers was in line to become CEO after her father's death and given that she had a less than stellar relationship with him, I can definitely see Vickers' resentment being so strong that she purposely sabotaged the Prometheus mission by recruiting unqualified, loose-cannon individuals and scientists so that Weyland wouldn't have the success he hoped for during the mission.

"Time to go home."

The Cruentus

Quote from: CoalescedChaos on May 03, 2017, 02:52:17 PM
Why does Millburn handle the Hammerpede the way he does? Why do some characters seem to lack common sense? We all know Vickers didn't necessarily adore her father to any extent. Understandably so, considering Weyland's non-remorseful words of "David is the son I never had."

The Weyland-Yutani Report states Vickers was personally responsible for choosing the entire crew of the Prometheus, save for Shaw, Holloway, and of course David who were chosen by Weyland.

Seeing as Vickers was in line to become CEO after her father's death and given that she had a less than stellar relationship with him, I can definitely see Vickers' resentment being so strong that she purposely sabotaged the Prometheus mission by recruiting unqualified, loose-cannon individuals and scientists so that Weyland wouldn't have the success he hoped for during the mission.

"Time to go home."


Problem with that theory though is that Vickers would also sabotage her own career in the process since it would be her decision to bring those "unqualified" on board and thus her fault.

SM

Vickers recruiting people meant she would have control over them, rather than Shaw and Holloway.

QuoteI know they didn't, hence why I said at the time the book was written.

The Company didn't own the USCM at the time the book was written.

Xenomrph

Quote from: TheBATMAN on May 02, 2017, 08:05:59 AM
Quote from: SM on Apr 30, 2017, 08:32:08 PM
The Company didn't own the USCM at that point.

I know they didn't, hence why I said at the time the book was written.

Quote from: Xenomrph on May 02, 2017, 02:29:40 AM
The pulse rifle isn't WY tech either, and it's a 200 year old gun.
We don't know what the Resurrection weapons are like because we don't see them in action and we know next to nothing about them. :P

My point is that if the book wasn't being fan-service-centric, there'd have been better ways to frame the pulse rifle (and other things) as being The Best Ever while still being an in-universe document. Taken strictly as an in-universe document, the presentation is pretty lacking, often cotnradictory, and doesn't really have a lot of reasoning behind it. Framed as a fan-supplement book whose focus is the popular movies and the things fans like, the presentation makes a lot more sense.

The pulse rifle technically is at the time the book was written, and regardless they have access to extensive archives on the weapon, what of it? In documented encounters with the Alien it is hailed as the best ever because from what we do know it was the most effective. No issue there. A few posts back you wanted to argue a case for the resurrection weapons but now seemingly admit we know nothing about them.

I fail to see what supplementary books are not written with 'fan-service' in mind. This is nit-picking to the extreme.
If the book had said the Pulse Rifle was "apparently effective" in the single encounter it gets used in, that'd be one thing. claiming it's the best ever is like claiming in 1798 that George Washington was "the best President ever". It's an extremely limited data set, and saying it's the best ever reeks of fanservice.

We know nothing about the Resurrection weapons because the book doesn't spend any time on them, because it'd rather fellate the Pulse Rifle (a weapon that had its own chapter in the USCM Tech Manual) with a multi-page spread.

The USCM Tech Manual is real light on fan service, considering 98% of the book is fabricated from whole cloth.

It's not nit-picking when fan-service drags down the quality and impact of the finished product.
When fan-service is the book's goal, as it was with the WY Report according to the author, then yeah it's fair to say it achieved its goal.

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