The Matrix: Resurrections (2021)

Started by Shasvre, Jan 24, 2011, 03:00:52 PM

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The Matrix: Resurrections (2021) (Read 40,399 times)

Kimarhi

Kimarhi

#420
I might have to watch it again, but I don't think that was the point. 

I mean one of the creators of the og series is the creator of this one.  Are they telling themselves to get f**ked?


I thought it was more a commentary on the cynical nature of todays population and the general distrust on what is conveyed on the media as being truth and how one should react and shouldn't. 


The media being all the characters telling neo what is real and what isn't. 


Kradan

Kradan

#421
Quote from: Xenomrph on Jan 23, 2022, 12:26:47 AM
Quote from: Kradan on Jan 23, 2022, 12:16:48 AM
Quote from: Xenomrph on Jan 22, 2022, 11:09:50 PM
A movie that wouldn't exist without the success and popularity of the prior movies?

And ? So what ?
Telling your own fanbase to "get f**ked" is called biting the hand that feeds you, and tends to not go over great with the audience that made the franchise successful.
There's probably a reason why the 4th movie is the lowest rated in the series on IMDb by a full point.

I  mean, it's obvious that flipping off your audience  is gonna infuriate many people. Doesn't necessarily make movie bad though. Lousy script, acting, actio n and special effects (I'm listing criticisms  I've heard other people have, not mine) do

Master

Master

#422
Well I hear all of your arguments. What I think is the biggest gripe I have with this one is how it mannaged to make this world so small. Insted of having many fractions in both machines and humans, fighting to get the symbol which is NEO on their side, we have machines vs humans 2.0 with much weaker plot and senseless reveal.

Xenomrph

Xenomrph

#423
Quote from: Kimarhi on Jan 23, 2022, 01:53:45 AM
I might have to watch it again, but I don't think that was the point. 

I mean one of the creators of the og series is the creator of this one.  Are they telling themselves to get f**ked?
The creator coming back to make it means they're personally the ones telling the audience to get f**ked.

I've seen articles where critics and reviewers contextualized the movie as WB basically giving Wachowski a blank check do whatever she wanted with a sequel (similar to Zack Snyder getting to do whatever he wanted with the director's cut of Justice League) and what we got with Matrix 4 is her doing exactly that.

That doesn't necessarily mean she's being cynical and actually genuinely flipping off her audience; I'm not sure I agree that that's what she's doing, but if it is what she's doing then it definitely undermines the movie and doesn't garner any good will. I've seen articles where she said that making the movie was her way of working through trauma (I can't recall exactly what the trauma was offhand), and *not* wanting to tackle that trauma was the reason why her sister didn't want to work on the movie.

Kimarhi

Kimarhi

#424
Quote from: Master on Jan 23, 2022, 12:26:17 PM
Well I hear all of your arguments. What I think is the biggest gripe I have with this one is how it mannaged to make this world so small. Insted of having many fractions in both machines and humans, fighting to get the symbol which is NEO on their side, we have machines vs humans 2.0 with much weaker plot and senseless reveal.


I think this is the main complaint.  It is essentially a retelling of the original but somehow with a smaller plot. 


I think this would work if it was the start of another trilogy, but it isnt making enough money to be more than just a one off. 






Nightmare Asylum

Nightmare Asylum

#425
I don't see this as a trilogy-starter at all, nor do I see it as a finale to the story (Revolutions remains that). This is much more an epilogue/coda and, prominently, a very contained romance - and a very personal one at that. More intimate in scale, and personal to these specific characters, and to Lana Wachowski herself. If in The Matrix, the romance was the backdrop to the much bigger conflict at play, then in Resurrections we're really seeing the inverse of that structure. There's a war going on, but what's really going to make everything ok is these two resurrected beings - these two halves of a singular entity, really - coming together. And The Matrix is a franchise that put its foot down right from movie number one and established the love between Neo and Trinity as being strong enough to literally bring Neo back to life, so hey, if the shoe fits!

A lot of it clicks into place even more, knowing what compelled Lana to actually agree to make the film this time, after years of Warner Bros pestering her and her sister to come back and eventually threatening that, with or without the Wachowskis, a "Matrix 4" would eventually happen.



Revolutions finished the story, completed the cycle innate to the original trilogy. Resurrections is much smaller, and sets out to do something different with its characters in the wake of that - and for me, at least, it succeeds. I don't want any more Matrix movies, and certainly not without either Wachowski at the helm. I got everything I could ever want out of it and more, now. And honestly, with all of the shit happening in the world right now, on a personal scale and at large, this kind of earnest, hopeful sentiment in the face of hardship is something I find myself really enamored with right now.

And as for the film having disdain for its audience - I don't think that's entirely accurate. This is a movie with its intent so genuine, and its heart on its sleeve the entire time. But also, one that recognizes that the only reason it even exists is because of the current climate that Hollywood is stuck within - reboots of decades-old properties, continuous sequels, ongoing cinematic universes, franchise resurrections, etc. That's the name of the game right now, and attaching a name like "Matrix" to the film is the only way Lana Wachowski was ever going to get a big, personal, heartfelt sci-fi film greenlit in this climate, especially after the box office failures of the Wachowskis' last couple movies (and that is very much reflected within the body of this film, in Lana's scathing analysis of modern day Hollywood as seen in the Analyst's characterization and his outlook on this world, the role "Warner Brothers" plays within the Matrix itself, Neo being forced to drop his "Binary" project in favor of continuing on the "Matrix" brand despite vowing to never want to do that, the Merovingian clamoring for a "spinoff" and screaming about the way things used to be, etc.). The meta stuff isn't just a wink and a nod - it's at the core of why this movie even exists in the first place, and makes a very strong case for Lana Wachowski being one of the few filmmakers working within a big brand right now to really be able to shake that system and use an established property to tell a story personal to her, the way she wants to.

This movie isn't for everyone, certainly. But I personally loved it, and found it to be one of the very best of this sort of 'decades later' franchise continuation films  (alongside the likes of Mad Mad: Fury Road and Blade Runner 2049).

skhellter

skhellter

#426
Loved it.

It's an epilogue to the series. Lana pretty much said she doesn't want to do sequels to it. lol
This closes the story fairly well.
Don't care that it flopped at the box office. No sequels are dependent on this performing well.
The Matrix is OVER.
And i hope WB leaves it alone.

It's closer in tone to the Grant Morrison comic books that inspired the first film than... any of the previous films, really.
And those books have such an oddball, meta specific tone that
i'm pretty sure that is what's making people feel really weirded out and left out.

And i'm fine with it, tbh.

Wish more blockbusters were as willing to be as weird as this is.

It's the Alien Covenant of the series.

As far as nostalgia.. the story is more interested in the idea of "legacy" and what you leave behind as a person:
You get Neo examining his legacy as an artist in the first half.
Neo examines his legacy as a rebel in the 2nd half.
That's not "giving cheap nostalgia" to audiences at all.


I don't even think it hates its audience at all.
It points to all the things the other movies did and goes... "ok, but let's do something different this time".
The film 100% gives you its intentions in the "nerd crew segment" with Neo having to put up with executives' "visions" of what a Matrix 4 ought to be while he's only really interested in pining for Trinity. It's a love story. And its success depends on whether you love these characters or not. I did.

I was aware that Lana had made suicide attempts years ago.
When Neo was revealed as a suicide-attempt-survivor it really underlined how personal this film actually is.

Kradan

Kradan

#427
Spoiler
Quote from: Nightmare Asylum on Jan 23, 2022, 06:14:39 PM
I don't see this as a trilogy-starter at all, nor do I see it as a finale to the story (Revolutions remains that). This is much more an epilogue/coda and, prominently, a very contained romance - and a very personal one at that. More intimate in scale, and personal to these specific characters, and to Lana Wachowski herself. If in The Matrix, the romance was the backdrop to the much bigger conflict at play, then in Resurrections we're really seeing the inverse of that structure. There's a war going on, but what's really going to make everything ok is these two resurrected beings - these two halves of a singular entity, really - coming together. And The Matrix is a franchise that put its foot down right from movie number one and established the love between Neo and Trinity as being strong enough to literally bring Neo back to life, so hey, if the shoe fits!

A lot of it clicks into place even more, knowing what compelled Lana to actually agree to make the film this time, after years of Warner Bros pestering her and her sister to come back and eventually threatening that, with or without the Wachowskis, a "Matrix 4" would eventually happen.



Revolutions finished the story, completed the cycle innate to the original trilogy. Resurrections is much smaller, and sets out to do something different with its characters in the wake of that - and for me, at least, it succeeds. I don't want any more Matrix movies, and certainly not without either Wachowski at the helm. I got everything I could ever want out of it and more, now. And honestly, with all of the shit happening in the world right now, on a personal scale and at large, this kind of earnest, hopeful sentiment in the face of hardship is something I find myself really enamored with right now.

And as for the film having distain for its audience - I don't think that's entirely accurate. This is a movie with its intent so genuine, and its heart on its sleeve the entire time. But also, one that recognizes that the only reason it even exists is because of the current climate that Hollywood is stuck within - reboots of decades-old properties, continuous sequels, ongoing cinematic universes, franchise resurrections, etc. That's the name of the game right now, and attaching a name like "Matrix" to the film is the only way Lana Wachowski was ever going to get a big, personal, heartfelt sci-fi film greenlit in this climate, especially after the box office failures of the Wachowskis' last couple movies (and that is very much reflected within the body of this film, in Lana's scathing analysis of modern day Hollywood as seen in the Analyst's characterization and his outlook on this world, the role "Warner Brothers" plays within the Matrix itself, Neo being forced to drop his "Binary" project in favor of continuing on the "Matrix" brand despite vowing to never want to do that, the Merovingian clamoring for a "spinoff" and screaming about the way things used to be, etc.). The meta stuff isn't just a wink and a nod - it's at the core of why this movie even exists in the first place, and makes a very strong case for Lana Wachowski being one of the few filmmakers working within a big brand right now to really be able to shake that system and use an established property to tell a story personal to her, the way she wants to.

This movie isn't for everyone, certainly. But I personally loved it, and found it to be one of the very best of this sort of 'decades later' franchise continuation films  (alongside the likes of Mad Mad: Fury Road and Blade Runner 2049).
[close]




Quote from: Nightmare Asylum on Jan 23, 2022, 06:14:39 PM
And as for the film having distain for its audience - I don't think that's entirely accurate. This is a movie with its intent so genuine, and its heart on its sleeve the entire time. But also, one that recognizes that the only reason it even exists is because of the current climate that Hollywood is stuck within - reboots of decades-old properties, continuous sequels, ongoing cinematic universes, franchise resurrections, etc. That's the name of the game right now, and attaching a name like "Matrix" to the film is the only way Lana Wachowski was ever going to get a big, personal, heartfelt sci-fi film greenlit in this climate, especially after the box office failures of the Wachowskis' last couple movies (and that is very much reflected within the body of this film, in Lana's scathing analysis of modern day Hollywood as seen in the Analyst's characterization and his outlook on this world, the role "Warner Brothers" plays within the Matrix itself, Neo being forced to drop his "Binary" project in favor of continuing on the "Matrix" brand despite vowing to never want to do that, the Merovingian clamoring for a "spinoff" and screaming about the way things used to be, etc.). The meta stuff isn't just a wink and a nod - it's at the core of why this movie even exists in the first place, and makes a very strong case for Lana Wachowski being one of the few filmmakers working within a big brand right now to really be able to shake that system and use an established property to tell a story personal to her, the way she wants to.

Quote from: skhellter on Jan 23, 2022, 06:33:15 PM
It's the Alien Covenant of the series.

Whiskeybrewer

I enjoyed what it did. The different route it took to get there.

Kradan

Kradan

#429
https://youtu.be/nNpvWBuTfrc

So I just randomly decided to watch this trailer. What made me interested is not the trailer itself but the comments section below. It is flooded with comments in Russian demanding justice for some Russian YouTuber known as "Star Captain" ("Звездный Капитан"). There's one comment in particular that gets repeated by different users almost word to word with slight variations:

Quote"Будьте разумными людьми, капитан это лучшее что было и есть на Ютубе! Такого анализа любви и подачи материала никто не проводит. Его уровень выше чем у режиссеров многих современных фильмов!"

"Be wise, people, Captain is the best thing that was and is on YouTube ! Such analysis and love and presentation is nowhere to be found. He's on a higher level than many modern directors !"

They even have their own hashtag a la #ReleaseTheSnyderCut - #FreedomToStarCaptain

I dug a little into this: apparently he did re-cap videos on original Matrix trilogy, got striked by WB, tried to push back, got striked again and his channel was under the threat of being completely deleted. Dude got so nervous that he had heart attack and was hospitalised. After the recovery he posted on his channel encouraging people to like his comment under the said trailer to draw attention to the problem. I guess, he got more than he could've wish for. Looks like it worked and his channel is back to normal

Never seen anything like it before

Kradan

Kradan

#430


Perfectly encapsulates Reloaded and Revolutions for me  :D

Kradan


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