1.3 Million Copies Shipped

Started by ikarop, May 10, 2013, 08:12:28 AM

Author
1.3 Million Copies Shipped (Read 3,575 times)

jyoung

jyoung

#15
Copies shipped does not equal copies sold.

I'd wager most game shelves are full of unsold copies of this game.

Not to mention the high amount of people who probably bought it, beat it, then immediately sold it or traded it in.

ShadowPred

ShadowPred

#16
Tomb Raider apparently had to make at least 5 Million in order to break even.

PRI. HUDSON

PRI. HUDSON

#17
Quote from: vonVince on May 10, 2013, 05:41:48 PM
They did make profit, whether we like it or not. Do I like it? Not in particular, because I had high expectations for the game - but I can move along and it is better move along - there's little to be gained with "fück this sh1t" commenting.

WRONG

Xenomrph

Xenomrph

#18
Quote from: ShadowPred on May 11, 2013, 08:04:19 PM
Tomb Raider apparently had to make at least 5 Million in order to break even.
That still sounds like "hollywood accounting" to me. If that were anywhere close to true, the studio would be full-on closing its doors for good as "video games" is obviously an unsustainable and unprofitable market.

PRI. HUDSON

PRI. HUDSON

#19
Quote from: ShadowPred on May 11, 2013, 08:04:19 PM
Tomb Raider apparently had to make at least 5 Million in order to break even.

I don't believe that. I think Sqaure was just being unrealistic about a game with great SP and bad/average MP.

The game will make profit. It sold 3.4 million copies in one month. Think about all the copies after a year.

ShadowPred

ShadowPred

#20
http://www.notenoughshaders.com/2012/07/02/the-rise-of-costs-the-fall-of-gaming/



Also, from the article, a list of all who went under since 2006 to 2012:



Quote3D Realms – 2009
7 Studios (Activision) – 2011
ACES Studio (Microsoft) – 2009
Action Forms – 2009
Artech Studios – 2011
Ascaron – 2009
Atomic Elbow – 2008
Backbone Vancouver
Beam Software/Melbourne House – 2010
BigBig (Sony) – 2012
Bizarre Creations (Activision) – 2010/2011
Black Rock (Disney) – 2011
Blue Fang Games - 2011
Blue Tongue (THQ) – 2011
BottleRocket – 2009
Brash Entertainment – 2008
Budcat (Activision) – 2010
Carbonated Games – 2008
Castaway Entertainment – 2008
Cheyenne Mountain – 2010
Cing – 2010
Clover Studios (Capcom) – 2006
Codemasters Guildford – 2011
Cohort Studios – 2011
Concrete Games – 2008
Dark Energy Digital – 2012
Deep Silver Vienna – 2010
DICE Canada – 2006
Digital Anvil – 2006
EA Chicago – 2007
EA Bright Light – 2011/2012
EA Japan – 2007
Eidos Manchester – 2009
Eidos Hungary – 2010
Empire Interactive – 2009
Ensemble Studios (Microsoft) – 2008
Factor 5 – 2009
FASA (Microsoft) – 2007
Fizz Factor – 2009
Flagship Studios – 2008
Flight Plan – 2010
Frozen North Productions
FuzzyEyes – 2009
Gamelab – 2009
Game Republic – 2011
GRIN – 2009
Groove Games – 2010
Helixe (THQ) – 2008
Hudson Entertainment – 2011
Humannature Studio (Nexon Vancouver) – 2009
Ignition London – 2010
Ignition Florida – 2010
Incognito Entertainment (Sony) – 2009
Indie Built (Take-Two) – 2006
Iron Lore – 2008
Juice Games (THQ) – 2011
Kaos Studios (THQ) – 2011
Killaware – 2011
Killspace Entertainment – 2011
KMM Brisbane – 2011
Krome Studios (might still be operating on skeleton crew) – 2010
Kuju Manila – 2009
Kuju Chemistry – 2009
Kush Games – 2008
Locomotive Games (THQ) – 2010
Loose Cannon Studios – 2010
Luxoflux – 2010
Mass Media (THQ) – 2008
Monte Cristo – 2010
Monumental Games – 2012
Midway Austin – 2009
Midway Newcastle – 2009
MTV Games – 2011
Multiverse – 2012
NetDevil – 2011
Ninja Studio – 2009
Nihon Telenet – 2007
Outerlight – 2010
PAM Development (Take-Two) – 2008
Pandemic Australia (EA) – 2009
Pandemic LA (EA) – 2009
Paradigm Entertainment – 2008
Pi Studios – 2011
Pivotal Games (Take-Two) – 2008
Propaganda Games (Disney) – 2011
Pseudo Interactive – 2008
Radical Entertainment – 2012
Rainbow Studios (THQ) – 2011
Razorworks – 2009
Realtime Worlds – 2010
Reakktor Media – 2012
Rebellion Derby – 2010
Red Octane – 2010
Redtribe – 2008
Rockstar Vienna – 2006
Sandblast Games (THQ) – 2008
SEGA San Francisco – 2010
Sensory Sweep Studios – 2010
Seta – 2008
Shaba Games (Activision) – 2009
SideCar Studios – 2007
Sierra Online – 2008
Snapdragon Games – 2009
SOE Denver – 2011
SOE Seattle – 2011
SOE Tuscon – 2011
Stormfront Studios – 2008
Straylight Studios – 2009
Team Bondi – 2011
The Code Monkeys – 2011
Titan Studios – 2009
THQ Studio Australia – 2009
THQ Digital Warrington – 2009
Transmission Games/IR Gurus – 2009
Ubisoft Brazil – 2010
Ubisoft Vancouver – 2012
Underground Development/Z-Axis (Activision) – 2010
Universomo (THQ) – 2009
Venom Games (Take Two) – 2008
Vicarious Visions California – 2007
Visceral Australia (EA) – 2011
Wolfpack Studios – 2006
Yuke's Company Of America – 2010
Zoe Mode London - 2009
Zoonami – 2011

PRI. HUDSON

PRI. HUDSON

#21
I hope Gearbox gets added to that list. The wrath of ACM will haunt them for a long time. I can feel it.

Inverse Effect

Inverse Effect

#22
Quote from: PRI. HUDSON on May 12, 2013, 01:14:20 AM
I hope Gearbox gets added to that list. The wrath of ACM will haunt them for a long time. I can feel it.

It will. Video game companies can't afford to make a loss nowadays on games or make bad business judgments.

Xenomrph

Xenomrph

#23
Quote from: ShadowPred on May 12, 2013, 12:06:44 AM
http://www.notenoughshaders.com/2012/07/02/the-rise-of-costs-the-fall-of-gaming/



Also, from the article, a list of all who went under since 2006 to 2012:



Quote3D Realms – 2009
7 Studios (Activision) – 2011
ACES Studio (Microsoft) – 2009
Action Forms – 2009
Artech Studios – 2011
Ascaron – 2009
Atomic Elbow – 2008
Backbone Vancouver
Beam Software/Melbourne House – 2010
BigBig (Sony) – 2012
Bizarre Creations (Activision) – 2010/2011
Black Rock (Disney) – 2011
Blue Fang Games - 2011
Blue Tongue (THQ) – 2011
BottleRocket – 2009
Brash Entertainment – 2008
Budcat (Activision) – 2010
Carbonated Games – 2008
Castaway Entertainment – 2008
Cheyenne Mountain – 2010
Cing – 2010
Clover Studios (Capcom) – 2006
Codemasters Guildford – 2011
Cohort Studios – 2011
Concrete Games – 2008
Dark Energy Digital – 2012
Deep Silver Vienna – 2010
DICE Canada – 2006
Digital Anvil – 2006
EA Chicago – 2007
EA Bright Light – 2011/2012
EA Japan – 2007
Eidos Manchester – 2009
Eidos Hungary – 2010
Empire Interactive – 2009
Ensemble Studios (Microsoft) – 2008
Factor 5 – 2009
FASA (Microsoft) – 2007
Fizz Factor – 2009
Flagship Studios – 2008
Flight Plan – 2010
Frozen North Productions
FuzzyEyes – 2009
Gamelab – 2009
Game Republic – 2011
GRIN – 2009
Groove Games – 2010
Helixe (THQ) – 2008
Hudson Entertainment – 2011
Humannature Studio (Nexon Vancouver) – 2009
Ignition London – 2010
Ignition Florida – 2010
Incognito Entertainment (Sony) – 2009
Indie Built (Take-Two) – 2006
Iron Lore – 2008
Juice Games (THQ) – 2011
Kaos Studios (THQ) – 2011
Killaware – 2011
Killspace Entertainment – 2011
KMM Brisbane – 2011
Krome Studios (might still be operating on skeleton crew) – 2010
Kuju Manila – 2009
Kuju Chemistry – 2009
Kush Games – 2008
Locomotive Games (THQ) – 2010
Loose Cannon Studios – 2010
Luxoflux – 2010
Mass Media (THQ) – 2008
Monte Cristo – 2010
Monumental Games – 2012
Midway Austin – 2009
Midway Newcastle – 2009
MTV Games – 2011
Multiverse – 2012
NetDevil – 2011
Ninja Studio – 2009
Nihon Telenet – 2007
Outerlight – 2010
PAM Development (Take-Two) – 2008
Pandemic Australia (EA) – 2009
Pandemic LA (EA) – 2009
Paradigm Entertainment – 2008
Pi Studios – 2011
Pivotal Games (Take-Two) – 2008
Propaganda Games (Disney) – 2011
Pseudo Interactive – 2008
Radical Entertainment – 2012
Rainbow Studios (THQ) – 2011
Razorworks – 2009
Realtime Worlds – 2010
Reakktor Media – 2012
Rebellion Derby – 2010
Red Octane – 2010
Redtribe – 2008
Rockstar Vienna – 2006
Sandblast Games (THQ) – 2008
SEGA San Francisco – 2010
Sensory Sweep Studios – 2010
Seta – 2008
Shaba Games (Activision) – 2009
SideCar Studios – 2007
Sierra Online – 2008
Snapdragon Games – 2009
SOE Denver – 2011
SOE Seattle – 2011
SOE Tuscon – 2011
Stormfront Studios – 2008
Straylight Studios – 2009
Team Bondi – 2011
The Code Monkeys – 2011
Titan Studios – 2009
THQ Studio Australia – 2009
THQ Digital Warrington – 2009
Transmission Games/IR Gurus – 2009
Ubisoft Brazil – 2010
Ubisoft Vancouver – 2012
Underground Development/Z-Axis (Activision) – 2010
Universomo (THQ) – 2009
Venom Games (Take Two) – 2008
Vicarious Visions California – 2007
Visceral Australia (EA) – 2011
Wolfpack Studios – 2006
Yuke's Company Of America – 2010
Zoe Mode London - 2009
Zoonami – 2011
Probably worth pointing out that a lot of those didn't actually "go under", but instead became part of different studios/changed names/were acquired by other companies, etc. The companies might not exist under those exact names, but the people working for them still work within the games industry making video games.

demonbane

demonbane

#24
Quote from: Xenomrph on May 11, 2013, 06:18:20 PM
I think you're not making the distinction between "meet (unrealistic) sales expectations" and "turn a profit".

All the game has to do is generate more revenue than it cost to make, and it turned a profit. It might not have met sales expectations, which led to layoffs, but that doesn't mean it didn't turn a profit.

Keep in mind that all of your examples (Tomb Raider, Hitman Absolution) have been Square Enix games, and Square is notoriously unrealistic about its projected sales expectations.

I don't disagree that game budgets are mega-bloated, mind you.
You haven't countered his estimate. He provided valid argument and evidence.

Xenomrph

Xenomrph

#25
There's other variables that his estimate isn't accounting for, and also doesn't include sales numbers for digital copies.

That and I countered his estimate with basic common sense - if what he's saying is true, where even highly-regarded, well received games that sell millions of copies are considered "failures", then the game industry would have imploded ages ago. The fact that video games are still made shows that there's something wrong with his numbers.
"Hollywood accounting" works the same way - sales figures can be manipulated in such a way that it's a "valid" interpretation that a movie was a total failure, but that doesn't mean it was actually true or even makes sense.

demonbane

demonbane

#26
Quote from: Xenomrph on May 12, 2013, 01:05:26 PM
There's other variables that his estimate isn't accounting for, and also doesn't include sales numbers for digital copies.

That and I countered his estimate with basic common sense - if what he's saying is true, where even highly-regarded, well received games that sell millions of copies are considered "failures", then the game industry would have imploded ages ago. The fact that video games are still made shows that there's something wrong with his numbers.
"Hollywood accounting" works the same way - sales figures can be manipulated in such a way that it's a "valid" interpretation that a movie was a total failure, but that doesn't mean it was actually true or even makes sense.
You forgot how much time and money was invested in A:CM compared to other games reaching millions. Cost is difference. You didn't mention that.

Xenomrph

Xenomrph

#27
Quote from: demonbane on May 13, 2013, 06:15:39 AM
Quote from: Xenomrph on May 12, 2013, 01:05:26 PM
There's other variables that his estimate isn't accounting for, and also doesn't include sales numbers for digital copies.

That and I countered his estimate with basic common sense - if what he's saying is true, where even highly-regarded, well received games that sell millions of copies are considered "failures", then the game industry would have imploded ages ago. The fact that video games are still made shows that there's something wrong with his numbers.
"Hollywood accounting" works the same way - sales figures can be manipulated in such a way that it's a "valid" interpretation that a movie was a total failure, but that doesn't mean it was actually true or even makes sense.
You forgot how much time and money was invested in A:CM compared to other games reaching millions. Cost is difference. You didn't mention that.
We don't know what the game's actual budget was, and we also don't know how many digital copies of the game sold. Gearbox and Sega didn't lay anybody off that we know of (nor did either of them cancel any other projects due to Colonial Marines being some kind of financially crippling failure or something like that) so I'm pretty confident they made some money out of the whole endeavor.

PRI. HUDSON

PRI. HUDSON

#28
Quote from: Xenomrph on May 13, 2013, 09:16:21 AM
Quote from: demonbane on May 13, 2013, 06:15:39 AM
Quote from: Xenomrph on May 12, 2013, 01:05:26 PM
There's other variables that his estimate isn't accounting for, and also doesn't include sales numbers for digital copies.

That and I countered his estimate with basic common sense - if what he's saying is true, where even highly-regarded, well received games that sell millions of copies are considered "failures", then the game industry would have imploded ages ago. The fact that video games are still made shows that there's something wrong with his numbers.
"Hollywood accounting" works the same way - sales figures can be manipulated in such a way that it's a "valid" interpretation that a movie was a total failure, but that doesn't mean it was actually true or even makes sense.
You forgot how much time and money was invested in A:CM compared to other games reaching millions. Cost is difference. You didn't mention that.
We don't know what the game's actual budget was, and we also don't know how many digital copies of the game sold. Gearbox and Sega didn't lay anybody off that we know of (nor did either of them cancel any other projects due to Colonial Marines being some kind of financially crippling failure or something like that) so I'm pretty confident they made some money out of the whole endeavor.

W/e makes you sleep at night. This game did not sell many copies on digital download. I would bet the house on that. This game is going to take a loss. The numbers will surface sooner or later.

Local Trouble

Local Trouble

#29
Did you buy another copy like I suggested?

Facebook Twitter Instagram YouTube RSS Feed