How did Rebellion make such a good AVP game in 99 but bombed in 2010

Started by PRI. HUDSON, Jan 28, 2013, 04:22:40 AM

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How did Rebellion make such a good AVP game in 99 but bombed in 2010 (Read 2,709 times)

PRI. HUDSON

Anyone know anything as to why this happened?

Cal427eb


OpenMaw

Quote from: PRI. HUDSON on Jan 28, 2013, 04:22:40 AM
Anyone know anything as to why this happened?

A different team with different motivations for a start. Though i'm sure some of the people were the same, I smell some new blood. I also think that the story and scripted events got int he way of the game being as good as it could be. Plus it was very short, which didn't help.

Just all around a "not what it could have been" scenario.




Njm1983

I suspect that sega had a hand in the unfinished state of the game. Not the first nor the last time that will happen.

WinterActual

Quote from: PRI. HUDSON on Jan 28, 2013, 04:22:40 AM
Anyone know anything as to why this happened?
Sega pushed Reb to release the game even if it wasn't finished. They wanted the money - they pushed Reb to release unfinished product.

The Necronoir

AVP '99 had a few points in its favour. First of all, its use of multiple perspectives and different play styles (particularly wall-walking) were new and innovative. Also, it was one of the first high-profile games to require a dedicated GPU, so it was something of a benchmark game for tech-heads, which FPS games have traditionally attracted (think Crysis).

AVP '10 obviously had the innovative gameplay angle taken away from the get-go, being the third entry in the series, let alone all the imitators in the intervening years. Also, while it's one of the relatively few games to make full use of DX11, this wasn't as big a draw on the tech-head scene (maybe because those without DX capable systems weren't aware of the difference it actually made). It may be fair to say that the requirement of console versions may have held it back in this regard, but that's debatable (equally it could be said to have greatly increased its market).

Bottom line though, AVP '10 wasn't a bomb. It topped sales charts in many countries for a number of weeks, and received generally fair to positive reviews. People just get lost in the negative hyperbole surrounding these things. At most you could probably chastise it for being unambitious, but by no means was it a bad game.

Vertigo

Quote from: The Necronoir on Jan 29, 2013, 09:04:07 AM
AVP '99 had a few points in its favour. First of all, its use of multiple perspectives and different play styles (particularly wall-walking) were new and innovative. Also, it was one of the first high-profile games to require a dedicated GPU, so it was something of a benchmark game for tech-heads, which FPS games have traditionally attracted (think Crysis).

AVP '10 obviously had the innovative gameplay angle taken away from the get-go, being the third entry in the series, let alone all the imitators in the intervening years. Also, while it's one of the relatively few games to make full use of DX11, this wasn't as big a draw on the tech-head scene (maybe because those without DX capable systems weren't aware of the difference it actually made). It may be fair to say that the requirement of console versions may have held it back in this regard, but that's debatable (equally it could be said to have greatly increased its market).

AvP 3 was far more of a tech benchmark than AvP 1 ever was. It's still occasionally used for benchmarking on the big hardware sites, and was used pretty much everywhere for the first year after its release. AvP 1, on the other hand, didn't offer a direct advantage in rendering over Unreal or Quake 3; the engine's strength was in its lighting effects and ability to render lots of complex entities on-screen at once. Not the kind of thing that necessarily translates in benchmarking.


I can't speak for why AvP 3 wasn't more of a hit on the consoles, but consolisation certainly spoiled it on the PC. With its forced movement and quick time events, it was a step backwards in that all-important fluidity which makes the PC so ideal for FPSs. Then there's the lack of mod tools, and dedicated servers at launch - Sega's decision rather than Rebellion's, but with all the publicity from benchmarking, AvP 3 could have had a great deal of longevity and continued accruing new players to this day. Without any expansion of the game though, and with multiplayer dead on arrival, they shot themselves in the foot. I also dimly recall a poor interface for multiplayer, but I haven't touched it in years.
I think a lot of players may have been put off by the difficulty level in singleplayer; I know it's kept me from replaying it casually. Rebellion were a bit obsessive about challenge in AvP 1, too, but at least there were some cheats available.

Corporal Hicks

As much as I liked AvP2010, it suffered from a lack of an actual script and writers. It was all pieced together in-house without a coherent story. And I believe the release we got was the...third build of the game that Sega saw and rushed out of the gate.

Cal427eb

Quote from: Corporal Hicks on Feb 02, 2013, 05:25:52 PM
As much as I liked AvP2010, it suffered from a lack of an actual script and writers. It was all pieced together in-house without a coherent story. And I believe the release we got was the...third build of the game that Sega saw and rushed out of the gate.
Yeah the story wasn't very well written but what did you think of the multiplayer? I for one thought that it was very fun.

shadowedge

2010 had a lack of weapons. AVP 99 had loads of them.

Wallwalking was awkward and buggy. AVP99's wallwalking was more natural.

The Alien and Predators super jumps were mishandled and buggy too.

The story was short and somewhat unsatisfying.

Multiplayer on consoles was pretty bad too, as was PCs for a while.

Also multiplayer was not as customizable as the old one. For instance you could not just have Aliens vs humans or Aliens vs Predators, all three had to be in it.

CONKERSBADFURDAY

I think part of it might be a simple change in the FPS genre. Back in the days of yore, you could carry around as many guns and as much ammo as you wanted, which was awesome. Now, we are restricted to two guns, or two and a sidearm. This move towards "realism" doesn't always work with games that are so completely unrealistic. It just feels annoying.

Less weapons as well.

I dunno. It's been ages since I played both games, but I do know AvP1 wasn't a console port with not-so-good Xenomorph controls. AI was probably better as well.

I've never been one to like Rebellion games, and I've only made exceptions for the AvP series. Everything else they make falls somewhere between "crap" and "uninteresting."

Corporal Hicks

Quote from: Cal427eb on Feb 02, 2013, 05:52:36 PM
Quote from: Corporal Hicks on Feb 02, 2013, 05:25:52 PM
As much as I liked AvP2010, it suffered from a lack of an actual script and writers. It was all pieced together in-house without a coherent story. And I believe the release we got was the...third build of the game that Sega saw and rushed out of the gate.
Yeah the story wasn't very well written but what did you think of the multiplayer? I for one thought that it was very fun.

I enjoyed it. I liked the melee mechanic but the rubbish matchmaking killed it for me.

Cal427eb

PC or console? Because I'd have to agree if you're talking about the consoles having never played it on PC. The matchmaking really was horrible.

Corporal Hicks

360. It wasn't so bad to start with and then it just got difficult. It took me ages to reach the max rank.

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