Dinosaurs and other prehistoric creatures

Started by DoomRulz, Jul 10, 2008, 12:17:08 AM

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Dinosaurs and other prehistoric creatures (Read 220,606 times)

KiramidHead

Hancock has also completely changed his theory several times.

Phobos

Epicyon


"Before dire and gray wolves roamed North America, an even bigger member of the canine family (the biggest member ever, in fact) was here. Epicyon lived between 12 and 6 million years ago, and was the size of a grizzly bear, weighing as much as 300 pounds, according to the Florida Museum."

Immortan Jonesy



Did you know that I wouldn't be able to enjoy my nachos with guacamole if it weren't for this guy?

Lestodon ⤵


"The avocado is a fruit of a different time. The plant hit its evolutionary prime during the beginning of the Cenozoic era when megafauna, including mammoths, horses, gomphotheres and giant ground sloths (some of them weighing more than a UPS truck) roamed across North America, from Oregon to the panhandle of Florida. The fruit attracted these very large animals (megafauna by definition weigh at least 100 pounds) that would then eat it whole, travel far distances and defecate, leaving the seed to grow in a new place. That's the goal of all botanical fruits, really. Survival and growth via seed dispersal."

Why the Avocado Should Have Gone the Way of the Dodo

I love avocado 💘^^


Phobos

Pterygotus


Pterygotus (name meaning "Winged One") is a genus of large eurypterid that originated during the Late Silurian Era in what is now North America and Europe. A giant sea scorpion that measured over 3 meters long, it was a distant ancestor of the modern-day crab and was also among the largest arthropods ever to live.

model in the Czech National Museum, Prague..


Phobos

The biggest insect ever was a huge "dragonfly"


"Its name is Meganeuropsis, and it ruled the skies before pterosaurs, birds and bats had even evolved. Most popular textbooks make mention of "giant dragonflies" that lived during the days before the dinosaurs. This is only partly true, for real dragonflies had still not evolved back then. Rather than being true dragonflies, they were the more primitive 'griffinflies' or Meganisopterans. Their fossil record is quite short. They lasted from the Late Carboniferous to the Late Permian, roughly 317 to 247 million years ago."



Immortan Jonesy

That's the spirit. I love ancient bugs as well 8)

Check this one here 👀



"With a 1 metre (3.3 feet) long, Anomalocaris is an extinct genus of radiodont, an order of animals thought to be closely related to ancestral arthropods. It is believed to be the apex predator of its ecosystem; the oceans of early to mid cambrian, in what's now Burgess Shale (British Columbia)".




"Concavenator corcovatus is a primitive member of Carcharodontosauria, exhibiting two unusual features: elongation of the neurapophyses of two presacral vertebrae forming a pointed, hump-like structure and a series of small bumps on the ulna. The teropod was a medium-sized (roughly 5.8 metres (19 ft) long) predator that lived approximately 130 million years ago during the early Cretaceous period."


Phobos

Ah, the Anomalocaris. The predator of the Cambrian age. And since we're on about bugs....

Here's an enormous Centipede, the Arthropleura.



Arthropleura was an ancestor to centipedes and millipedes. It could reach more than eight feet (2.4 m) in length, and the fatter creatures could be several feet wide—think, for a moment, of something like that brushing up against your leg. It was so massive that despite being an invertebrate it probably had very few predators, and it is by far the largest invertebrate species ever unearthed. Arthropleura lived from the Carboniferous to the early Permian period—throughout what is now North America and Scotland—around 300 million years ago. 

Local Trouble

The host calls Ken Ham "the world's favorite Aussie."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RVoFFBcIb80

Phobos

And he even pronounced it right. I hear Australians consider it a crime against humanity for pronouncing it ''Au-sea".

Immortan Jonesy

Immortan Jonesy

#1524
There is a Christian attraction / creationist museum in Kentucky called "Ark Encounter" that has dinosaurs as part of the animals that "Noah rescued from the flood"  :-X












There is even a diorama with gladiators fighting a Carnotaurus!!!!






https://youtu.be/Gf7Gnkl4zuY

Quote from: Gr33n M4n on Nov 18, 2020, 10:58:51 PM
Ah, the Anomalocaris. The predator of the Cambrian age. And since we're on about bugs....

Here's an enormous Centipede, the Arthropleura.



Arthropleura was an ancestor to centipedes and millipedes. It could reach more than eight feet (2.4 m) in length, and the fatter creatures could be several feet wide—think, for a moment, of something like that brushing up against your leg. It was so massive that despite being an invertebrate it probably had very few predators, and it is by far the largest invertebrate species ever unearthed. Arthropleura lived from the Carboniferous to the early Permian period—throughout what is now North America and Scotland—around 300 million years ago. 

Wow that's a hell of a centipede  :o

I love prehistoric bugs, and one of the things I liked about Peter Jackson's 'King Kong, was the scene where the crew of sailors are attacked by all kinds of giant arthropods. They are all fictional species, but still great. There was even a fictional encyclopedia with information on all the creatures that inhabit the skull island of that particular film  8)




https://youtu.be/mCfQ122QUQo

KiramidHead

You could actually fight giant centipedes in the King Kong game, too.

Immortan Jonesy

Really? Cool! 8) Although I had no idea that there was a video game  :-\

KiramidHead

Yep. And as movie based games go, it's pretty damn good.

Local Trouble

Quote from: Immortan Jonesy on Nov 19, 2020, 03:09:07 AM
There is a Christian attraction / creationist museum in Kentucky called "Ark Encounter" that has dinosaurs as part of the animals that "Noah rescued from the flood"  :-X

Did you visit?

Immortan Jonesy

I don't do that.

Quote from: KiramidHead on Nov 19, 2020, 03:19:20 AM
Yep. And as movie based games go, it's pretty damn good.

Is it from the human perspective? or is it possible to play as Kong too?



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