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Alien: Romulus To Release Theatrically August 16th 2024!

According to a new report from Hollywood Reporter, Disney has been announced some pretty notable changes to its upcoming theatrical slate. The most important of which to members of the Alien vs. Predator Galaxy is that the previously straight-to-streaming Alien: Romulus is now heading into cinemas August 16th 2024!

20th Century has added another installment in the Alien franchise, dated for Aug. 16, 2024. Filmmaker Fede Alvarez is behind the feature, which stars Cailee Spaeny. The studio has also added the Rami Malek thriller The Amateur to Nov. 8, 2024.

Alien: Romulus was initially announced as a straight-to-Hulu release back in March 2023, but Fede Alvarez’s upcoming Alien film had been rumoured to be changing its release destination, which is now confirmed.

 Alien: Romulus To Release Theatrically August 16th 2024!

While official news on the film has been quiet, according to Production Weekly filming on Alien: Romulus should have been wrapping up in May but a recent Instagram post from actor Archie Renaux showed several of the actors still together last week.

Following the recent success of Dan Trachtenberg’s Prey, many fans had been calling for that film – and Alien: Romulus – to get a theatrical release. How do you feel about the change? Sound off in the comments below! Thanks to Gimitko for the heads up!

Keep your browsers locked on Alien vs. Predator Galaxy for the latest Alien: Romulus news! You can follow us on FacebookTwitter, Instagram and YouTube to get the latest on your social media walls. You can also join in with fellow Alien and Predator fans on our forums!



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Comments: 168
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  1. Eal
    Quote from: Necronomicon II on Jun 27, 2023, 03:22:32 PM"Dear AVPG,
    The use of gore and the use of imagination in storytelling are not mutually exclusive because they can often serve complementary roles. Let's explore how:

    Artistic Medium: In both literature and film, gore is an artistic tool, much like any other form of imagery. It's not the gore itself that matters, but the way it is portrayed, interpreted, and integrated into the story. When well executed, it can stimulate imagination by triggering strong emotions, promoting visual or mental imagery, and enhancing narrative tension or thematic depth.

    Psychological Impact: The use of gore can spark imagination by inducing psychological reactions. It can lead to a heightened state of alertness, curiosity, or fear, which might prompt audiences to predict future events, empathize with characters, or reflect on underlying themes. This process inherently involves the imagination.

    Symbolism and Metaphor: Gore can be used symbolically or metaphorically, encouraging audiences to think beyond the literal and consider deeper meanings or themes. This interpretative process is a fundamental aspect of imagination.

    World-Building and Character Development: Gore can contribute to world-building and character development. It can hint at the harshness of a world or the resilience of a character, encouraging audiences to imagine the broader context or backstory.

    Sensory Engagement: Gore, especially in visual media, engages multiple senses (vision, sound, etc.), stimulating the audience's sensory imagination. In written media, detailed descriptions can achieve a similar effect.

    Therefore, gore can be a means of engaging and activating the audience's imagination, rather than detracting from it. However, it's crucial to use it judiciously and purposefully, in line with the story's tone, theme, and intended audience, to avoid gratuitous or senseless violence.

    Here's an example: As he proceeded closer to the scene, the earth squelched beneath. Warm, viscous crimson liquid swelled and effervesced up between his toes like water being squeezed from a soiled sink sponge. His gaze was drawn to the dripping yellow treacle draining against the wall, tracing its trail to the runny-yolk eyes of a deformed body plastered on the ceiling. It was no ordinary body. An inconceivable union of flesh and steel. "What...happened here?"

    (cue imagination)

    Best, ChatGPT"


    Anyway I'll be away for a while, lots of stuff happening, I'll return when I can when some particular book(s) arrive.

    Peace.

    The yolk-iest eggmorphing description I've seen.
  2. Necronomicon II
    "Dear AVPG,
    The use of gore and the use of imagination in storytelling are not mutually exclusive because they can often serve complementary roles. Let's explore how:

    Artistic Medium: In both literature and film, gore is an artistic tool, much like any other form of imagery. It's not the gore itself that matters, but the way it is portrayed, interpreted, and integrated into the story. When well executed, it can stimulate imagination by triggering strong emotions, promoting visual or mental imagery, and enhancing narrative tension or thematic depth.

    Psychological Impact: The use of gore can spark imagination by inducing psychological reactions. It can lead to a heightened state of alertness, curiosity, or fear, which might prompt audiences to predict future events, empathize with characters, or reflect on underlying themes. This process inherently involves the imagination.

    Symbolism and Metaphor: Gore can be used symbolically or metaphorically, encouraging audiences to think beyond the literal and consider deeper meanings or themes. This interpretative process is a fundamental aspect of imagination.

    World-Building and Character Development: Gore can contribute to world-building and character development. It can hint at the harshness of a world or the resilience of a character, encouraging audiences to imagine the broader context or backstory.

    Sensory Engagement: Gore, especially in visual media, engages multiple senses (vision, sound, etc.), stimulating the audience's sensory imagination. In written media, detailed descriptions can achieve a similar effect.

    Therefore, gore can be a means of engaging and activating the audience's imagination, rather than detracting from it. However, it's crucial to use it judiciously and purposefully, in line with the story's tone, theme, and intended audience, to avoid gratuitous or senseless violence.

    Here's an example: As he proceeded closer to the scene, the earth squelched beneath. Warm, viscous crimson liquid swelled and effervesced up between his toes like water being squeezed from a soiled sink sponge. His gaze was drawn to the dripping yellow treacle draining against the wall, tracing its trail to the runny-yolk eyes of a deformed body plastered on the ceiling. It was no ordinary body. An inconceivable union of flesh and steel. "What...happened here?"

    (cue imagination)

    Best, ChatGPT"


    Anyway I'll be away for a while, lots of stuff happening, I'll return when I can when some particular book(s) arrive.

    Peace.
  3. Nightmare Asylum
    Given Alvarez's filmography, I do expect a gorier film here than we usually see from this series. Perez looking at the chunk of his brain in Resurrection and Covenant's shower scene both feel like things that are very much in his wheelhouse.
  4. Necronomicon II
    It's not either/or; you can see a gory aftermath rife with twisted body horror that leaves questions as to what exactly happened, for example, leaving the viewer to make inferences and fill in blanks.   

  5. Necronomicon II
    Quote from: Local Trouble on Jun 27, 2023, 12:07:38 AM
    Quote from: Necronomicon II on Jun 26, 2023, 11:51:06 PM
    Quote from: SiL on Jun 26, 2023, 09:07:16 PMMake chestbursting the centrepiece again.

    The adult killing people is kind of dull and perfunctory after a while. Bursting's the real horror show.

    Yep agreed, the original made me lose my appetite as a wee lad, and the cocooned woman burster in Aliens was genuinely horrifying. Horner's score really amps up the intensity there too.

    For me, the most horrible part was what we didn't see: all the kids who got cocooned and suffered a horrible death by chestburster.  Bonus points if their parents had to watch.

    Yup truly f**ked up, that's the kind of messed up, sick "gore" I want to see; disgusting hive body horror leaving your imagination to go to dark places to infer what happened.
  6. Eal
    Quote from: Kradan on Jun 26, 2023, 10:01:59 PM
    Quote from: caffeine4671 on Jun 26, 2023, 05:27:43 PMI guess it depends on whether you come from the Jay Bauman or Mike Stoklassa school when it comes to realistic gore.

    Could you elaborate on that ?

    Bauman, the shorter guy with the beard from RLM that always seems upbeat has a penchant for obscure indie movies and very depressing horror movies, including graphic ones. Mike Stoklassa, the taller guy from RLM who always sounds drunk likes Friday the 13th, but is more of an upbeat person, movie-taste-wise; he'd opt for more of a splatter comedy than something that Jay Bauman would pick, although they'd both probably enjoy it in the end.

  7. Local Trouble
    Quote from: Necronomicon II on Jun 26, 2023, 11:51:06 PM
    Quote from: SiL on Jun 26, 2023, 09:07:16 PMMake chestbursting the centrepiece again.

    The adult killing people is kind of dull and perfunctory after a while. Bursting's the real horror show.

    Yep agreed, the original made me lose my appetite as a wee lad, and the cocooned woman burster in Aliens was genuinely horrifying. Horner's score really amps up the intensity there too.

    For me, the most horrible part was what we didn't see: all the kids who got cocooned and suffered a horrible death by chestburster.  Bonus points if their parents had to watch.
  8. Necronomicon II
    Quote from: SiL on Jun 26, 2023, 09:07:16 PMMake chestbursting the centrepiece again.

    The adult killing people is kind of dull and perfunctory after a while. Bursting's the real horror show.

    Yep agreed, the original made me lose my appetite as a wee lad, and the cocooned woman burster in Aliens was genuinely horrifying. Horner's score really amps up the intensity there too.


    Quote from: Local Trouble on Jun 26, 2023, 11:50:16 PM
    Quote from: Kradan on Jun 26, 2023, 10:01:59 PM
    Quote from: caffeine4671 on Jun 26, 2023, 05:27:43 PMI guess it depends on whether you come from the Jay Bauman or Mike Stoklassa school when it comes to realistic gore.

    Could you elaborate on that ?

    Don't ask questions!  Just consume product and get excited for next product! >:(


    Elaborate on that.

    David Lynch: No.
  9. SiL
    Make chestbursting the centrepiece again.

    The adult killing people is kind of dull and perfunctory after a while. Bursting's the real horror show.
  10. [cancerblack]
    Quote from: nanison on Jun 26, 2023, 10:29:24 AMWell I hope it doesn't have that much gore, it's a suspense action series not a gore fest. Besides gore stopped being fun about 25 years ago because it got too realistic compared with 80s gore which was just plain rubbery fun.

    So as far as evil dead goes, the original is absolutely the movie to go too imo, this remake takes all the fun out of it.

    I think we need to delineate between gore as an aspect of body horror, and on-screen violence leading directly to gore. Seeing the result is different to seeing it happen, and there's a big difference between something like that taking inspiration from say, The Thing or a certain Swiss surrealist, and just having limbs chopped off all over the place.
  11. nanison
    Well I hope it doesn't have that much gore, it's a suspense action series not a gore fest. Besides gore stopped being fun about 25 years ago because it got too realistic compared with 80s gore which was just plain rubbery fun.

    So as far as evil dead goes, the original is absolutely the movie to go too imo, this remake takes all the fun out of it.
  12. Necronomicon II
    I pulled up Evil Dead for his penchant for in-camera FX, not to imply that it will have the same level of gore. I have no idea about that. Two very different properties, and as as Sil said if it laser focuses on tense, unpretentious set ups Fede can definitely nail that.
  13. SiL
    I thought Don't Breathe was plenty tense. Ending was a let-down, but it definitely got the blood pumping.

    I'm looking forward to a simple, unpretentious scary movie. I think Fede can deliver.
  14. [cancerblack]
    Quote from: nanison on Jun 25, 2023, 06:37:49 PMC'mon guys, I'm excited as well but this is not going to be great. Don't breath and evil dead are well made films but not classics. It's going to be super bloody and gory but tell me how bloody and gory was alien or aliens? It is all about the suspense, the anticipation and the great characters.
    We will see.

    Nobody's saying Evil Dead (2013) is a classic, just that it's competent and more fun than it has any right to be.

    Nobody's talking about Don't Breathe at all, and rightly so imo.
  15. nanison
    C'mon guys, I'm excited as well but this is not going to be great. Don't breath and evil dead are well made films but not classics. It's going to be super bloody and gory but tell me how bloody and gory was alien or aliens? It is all about the suspense, the anticipation and the great characters.
    We will see.
  16. Stitch
    It's much more violent and much less slapstick than Raimi. It's basically a semi-remake of the original The Evil Dead but on a bigger budget, so it's very violent and gory.
  17. El Diablo
    True story. I was at a screening of Fede's EVIL DEAD where a young lady sitting a few seats away from me, who was clearly overwhelmed by the violence, kept trying to convince her boyfriend to leave. During the amputation scene she got up and attempted to walk out, then collapsed in the aisle. Took a few minutes and some help from other theater patrons to get her awake and on her feet. I'd heard stories of people passing out during screenings of THE EXORCIST and even the original ALIEN but that was the first time I'd witnessed such a thing in person.
  18. Corporal Hicks
    Still one of only 2 films I've had to walk out of and take a breather outside the cinema. Granted, the other was because I'd overeaten but Fede's Evil Dead was because it made me feel ill with the intensity of the violence.  :laugh:
  19. [cancerblack]
    Quote from: caffeine4671 on Jun 19, 2023, 04:32:40 PM
    Quote from: [cancerblack] on Jun 19, 2023, 03:41:24 PMI mean, it kind of goes without saying that directing a film is a whole different kettle of fish to producing, aka, throwing money around. I bring up TCM because writing something is also kind of a huge part of things, and that has his Evil Dead fingerprints all over it.

    Now, I think there's a point to be made that Evil Dead is a much better film (this is a good thing for us btw), but out of the TCM movies I'd put the one he had a lot to do with as second equal with TCM 2 (which is only there because it's so f**king ridiculous and funny), after the original.

    Interesting! I've heard that his version of Evil-Dead tones down the comedy quite a bit. I'm assuming at least some of the comedy then in TCM was unintentional?

    Sorry, to clarify, Texas Chainsaw 2 is a splatter-comedy. The new one is not funny or supposed to be.

    Fede's Evil Dead does have some slapstick as NA has said. Keep in mind the original Evil Dead stuff wasn't really funny til Evil Dead 2 anyway.
  20. Nightmare Asylum
    I think Alvarez's Evil Dead is very funny in places, though it's definitely a dark sense of humor even when it does embrace some slapstick flourishes (a guy slipping on a piece of his friend's cheek after she mutilates her own face and then smacking his own head right into the toilet immediately comes to mind). It does also get pretty grim as well, though, and on the whole the movie kind of straddles that line back and forth.
  21. Eal
    Quote from: [cancerblack] on Jun 19, 2023, 03:41:24 PMI mean, it kind of goes without saying that directing a film is a whole different kettle of fish to producing, aka, throwing money around. I bring up TCM because writing something is also kind of a huge part of things, and that has his Evil Dead fingerprints all over it.

    Now, I think there's a point to be made that Evil Dead is a much better film (this is a good thing for us btw), but out of the TCM movies I'd put the one he had a lot to do with as second equal with TCM 2 (which is only there because it's so f**king ridiculous and funny), after the original.

    Interesting! I've heard that his version of Evil-Dead tones down the comedy quite a bit. I'm assuming at least some of the comedy then in TCM was unintentional?
  22. [cancerblack]
    I mean, it kind of goes without saying that directing a film is a whole different kettle of fish to producing, aka, throwing money around. I bring up TCM because writing something is also kind of a huge part of things, and that has his Evil Dead fingerprints all over it.

    Now, I think there's a point to be made that Evil Dead is a much better film (this is a good thing for us btw), but out of the TCM movies I'd put the one he had a lot to do with as second equal with TCM 2 (which is only there because it's so f**king ridiculous and funny), after the original.
  23. PortugueseXeno
    I love Evil Dead 2013 (even more than the original two) and i really like Don't Breathe.

    I didn't watch Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2022 and from the looks of it, that movie seems to be really despised everywhere.

    But at the end of the day, Fede wrote and directed Evil Dead and Don't Breathe, while his contributions to TCM were simply as a writer and a producer.

    I think fede put more effort into the movies that he personally directed, instead of the ones where he produced and wrote.

    Directing is like raising a child, your baby, while producing is more like babysitting some random kid hahahah.

    That is how i see it.
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