Latest News

This.Is.Ataegina! An Interview with Aliens: Phalanx Author Scott Sigler – AvPGalaxy Podcast #103

We have just uploaded the 103rd episode of the Alien vs. Predator Galaxy Podcast (right-click and save as to download)! For our latest episode I am joined by Scott Sigler, author of Dangerous Prey (one of the handful of shorts from Aliens: Bug Hunt that I thoroughly enjoyed) and the absolutely brilliant Aliens: Phalanx which came out at the end of February!

 This.Is.Ataegina! An Interview with Aliens: Phalanx Author Scott Sigler - AvPGalaxy Podcast #103

We discuss writing from the Alien’s point of view in Dangerous Prey, the research that went into writing a convincing combat between Aliens and a medieval society, and plenty more which you’ll have to listen to the podcast to find out! Beware story spoilers though!

You can find out more about Scott by checking out his website, following him on Facebook or Twitter, or listening to his podcast – Scott Sigler Audiobooks! This episode is also available as a video interview on YouTube!

What did you think of our latest episode? Be sure to let us know down below! You can also listen to any of our previous episodes in the Podcast section under the News tab on the main menu. The Alien vs. Predator Galaxy Podcast is also available via iTunes, PodBean, GooglePlay Stitcher, YouTube and Spotify! Please be sure to leave a review on whichever platform you’re using!

Keep a close eye on Alien vs. Predator Galaxy for the latest on Alien and Predator! You can follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram to get the latest on your social media walls. You can also join in with fellow Alien and Predator fans on our forums!



Post Comment
Comments: 60
« Newer Comments 12 Older Comments »
  1. HuDaFuK
    Spoiler
    If sexist portrayals of women are some kind of institutional problem with fantasy books, I couldn't say. I've said before how sword-and-shield stuff really isn't my thing and this might well be the only such book I've ever read.

    I certainly don't think sexist portrayals of women are a problem in the Alien series. And as such this book really didn't bother me :-\
    [close]
  2. The Cruentus
    Spoiler
    Yeah, I think only one settlement there had any progression and that was the one led by a woman. To give credit where credit is due, the franchise overall has been progressive as whole, even in the 90s. It has a large amount of LGBT characters and women are usually the main protagonist, but I suppose once in awhile, old views and habits will leak through in some stories but at least here, its kind of in sync with the setting as Huda said.
    [close]
  3. The Cruentus
    Quote from: Kradan on May 25, 2020, 11:36:12 PM
    Quote from: Hudson on May 25, 2020, 04:23:05 PM
    *
    Spoiler
    The book ending with the image of Liyah cradling her baby has a very man-writing-women-characters vibe to it. It's a woman so she better have kids!
    [close]

    I have the same problem with it


    Spoiler
    ]While I suppose an argument could be made for that, the whole situation and backwards society thing means that women are treated less than men in some of the settlements. I cannot remember for sure but I recall something about breeding being a necessity and some women purposefully have children to avoid doing the runs. So its more of a surviival thing than a they-women-so-they-must-have-kids thing..
    [close]
  4. Hudson
    Quote from: Stitch on May 26, 2020, 06:17:58 AM
    One thing that was glaringly obvious to me was that on at least one occasion, the main character's name was misspelled. I get that it was a big book, and longer than most of the EU novels released recently, but the proofreader(s) slipped up a lot.

    It's really not a good look after Bug Hunt, which you would hope was embarrassing for anyone involved in a way that it would light a fire under their asses the next time. Apparently not. And yeah, it's a long book, but not nearly the first time a long novel has been published in a media franchise's EU or otherwise.
  5. Stitch
    Quote from: Hudson on May 25, 2020, 04:23:05 PM
    The typographical errors are persistent through the whole thing.
    Spoiler
    For instance, was it 318 or 319 years? Two numbers are given on the same page.
    [close]
    Not a good look. If I was the Fox/Disney suit in charge of these books, that would piss me off.

    One thing that was glaringly obvious to me was that on at least one occasion, the main character's name was misspelled. I get that it was a big book, and longer than most of the EU novels released recently, but the proofreader(s) slipped up a lot.
  6. Hudson
    Final thoughts:

    It loses momentum for me over the final 150 or so pages, but I would still put it up there with The Cold Forge & Out of the Shadows as one of the more successful books in the series. I think my main problem is that this book does a really thorough job of building up an engaging group of characters, and has a really good eye on crafting a compelling human story that says quite a bit about various non-Alien franchise things, only to leave us with an extended ending sequence focused on physical action that doesn't serve as much of a culmination of any of those substantive elements. Boring battle scenes, and then more boring battle scenes. None of that stuff was very interesting to read,
    Spoiler
    especially considering Albus Dumbledore dies too early, eliminating a solid thread of tension
    [close]
    . A lot could have been cut and/or summarized. In particular, everything closely orbiting battle tactics. Anything involving the chess game Liyah plays, and then the considerations of that information coming up later. I found all of that excruciatingly boring from a pacing perspective. I'm not planning a D&D campaign.

    Overall, you could cut a lot from this and still have a solid novel. I thought it was a cool idea and it was mostly well executed. It was generally a fun book to read, and I felt like it did a good job of reaching for more than the vast majority of Alien novels. The portrayal of the Aliens was effective, which feels like a roll of the dice each time I start reading one of these. Still have to be that guy about the proofing of the book. The typographical errors are persistent through the whole thing.
    Spoiler
    For instance, was it 318 or 319 years? Two numbers are given on the same page.
    [close]
    Not a good look. If I was the Fox/Disney suit in charge of these books, that would piss me off.

    Other disjointed thoughts:

    * This was a better YA novel than Echo.

    * The fat character is named Panda, and is generally described as being overweight and good at his job because his job is sedentary, which is good because he won't have to move around much, which would be difficult for him because he's fat. See the pattern? The book constantly reminds you that Panda is the fat character. For all the self-awareness of the novel, this is never reconciled from what I could tell. It's just there so you can laugh at a fat person. Panda is fat, and that's all there is to it. These moments are straight up 90s Adam Sandler.

    *
    Spoiler
    The book ending with the image of Liyah cradling her baby has a very man-writing-women-characters vibe to it. It's a woman so she better have kids!
    [close]

    *
    Spoiler
    The plot twist is cool, but it was predictable. The book was relying on subverting Alien conventions by transitioning to sword & shield, so, the PLEASE DON'T SPOIL THIS plea at the beginning basically revealed that something worth spoiling was going to happen, and my mind immediately leapt to The Village in space. Plot wise, it's fine. It makes sense and I think it's a cool idea. However, I still don't really get how you could go 300+ years and no one would ever have discovered the leaves had a chemical property to them that blocked the acid blood. But okay. Also, when did we decide that if someone is an android, their dialogue has to be really badly written? This character dials back all the interesting progress made by Davis in the Zula Hendricks stories.
    [close]

    * I would read more novels in this particular series/thread if more were published. I would even look forward to them! I think there's still a lot you can do with this concept.
  7. SpaceKase
    Quote from: Corporal Hicks on May 12, 2020, 10:31:18 AM
    What are people's thoughts on the (spoiler for the end of the book)

    Spoiler
    blue lighting continually mentioned during the hive sequence? Is it a throwback to the laser light from Alien? I'm struggling to make my mind up, as the book also references the light coming from the eggs and such.
    [close]

    Spoiler
    I think yes and yes. Visually (in the mind's eye anyway) it has that immediate association for us from the original film to instantly let us know that our heroes are in the final level as it were, the den of the beast. Contextually for Ahiliyah it offers her an instant telltale that she's not waking in any place she's ever known or is aware of. Expositionaly, it's another callback to the unique bioluminescent traits of Ataegina's waters and given how wet things are in the hives and in the eggs and such a really nice way to create some unsettling imagery, provide the characters something to see their surroundings with that isn't ancient or Ataeginian made and also a fun callback to the rarely referenced watery translucence and inner glow from the eggs of the original film. I think the blue glow water is just infused into anything containing moisture that happened to grown in that environment.
    [close]

    Somewhere I've got a McFarland Alien vs Predator two figure set that features an egg with a little light inside that makes it glow from within, it's always been my favorite part.


    I've always loved the laser light from the egg chamber scene in the original film, and like the AvP2 game I've always preferred to think of it as (failing) stasis field, Pilot technology that's breaking down due to age and seismic activity, the egg containment starts to breach and the acoustic warning beacon immediately starts blasting through the æther. Isolation did such a gorgeous job picking up on this theme with the Marlowe beacon scene on the derelict. I think Steel Egg is the only time it was ever inferred that the mist field was some kind of emission from the eggs themselves (thankfully the only time IMHO).

    On another non sequitur side note, the bit with the water droplets dripping up from the eggs has always been another one of my  favorite little details from the film, and one of the few atmospheric tidbits that I thought Colonial Marines really got right, if I'm remembering correctly, anyway.
  8. Corporal Hicks
    What are people's thoughts on the (spoiler for the end of the book)

    Spoiler
    blue lighting continually mentioned during the hive sequence? Is it a throwback to the laser light from Alien? I'm struggling to make my mind up, as the book also references the light coming from the eggs and such.
    [close]
  9. Kradan
    Oh man, I don't want to keep you in suspence for so long. It's not really A SPOILER (nothing like Darth Vaider is Luke's father bullshit). It's just a joke really. So, if you trust my word you can look it up now and it won't affect your knowledge of the plot in any way.
  10. Kradan
    Quote from: Hudson on Apr 28, 2020, 02:03:11 PM
    Quote from: Kradan on Apr 10, 2020, 08:37:08 PM

    Was it better than (Alex White, forgive my soul) THE COLD FORGE ?

    For me, it was. By the slightest.

    Probably got about 200 pages left and so far I agree. This is my favorite novel in the franchise so far, unless it collapses horribly from this point to the end which I doubt. I'm especially enjoying how political the book is with the numerous allegories that continue to populate the story. For instance, the current refugee crisis and the way the US government has responded to it, among other current issues. Beyond that, it's well-written and the characters are engaging and feel effectively portrayed. Someone at Titan could have proofed the manuscript though. Woops!  :o

    ! SPOILER ALERT !

    Spoiler
    It won't
    [close]
  11. Hudson
    Quote from: Kradan on Apr 10, 2020, 08:37:08 PM

    Was it better than (Alex White, forgive my soul) THE COLD FORGE ?

    For me, it was. By the slightest.

    Probably got about 200 pages left and so far I agree. This is my favorite novel in the franchise so far, unless it collapses horribly from this point to the end which I doubt. I'm especially enjoying how political the book is with the numerous allegories that continue to populate the story. For instance, the current refugee crisis and the way the US government has responded to it, among other current issues. Beyond that, it's well-written and the characters are engaging and feel effectively portrayed. Someone at Titan could have proofed the manuscript though. Woops!  :o
  12. Nightmare Asylum
    Finally finished this one tonight. Quite liked it, and definitely worthy of sitting on the shelf alongside The Cold Forge.

    I have quite a few thoughts on things I'd like to discuss, but I'll hold out on all of that until after I go through all of the spoiler tags in this thread.
  13. Kradan
    Completely off topic, but hey ! You're The Old One again ! Or is it just my PC glitching ?


    Was it better than (Alex White, forgive my soul) THE COLD FORGE ?

    For me, it was. By the slightest.
  14. The Old One
    So good, perfect uses of two appropriate quotes from the films and, because of the mostly wholly new dialogue when they did get used it created more of an impact;

    "If it comes to that, I'll do us both."

    "Hey f**kface, come and get me!"

    A lesson in good fanservice.
  15. Nightmare Asylum
    Quote from: Hudson on Mar 25, 2020, 04:02:12 PM
    Quote from: Kradan on Mar 25, 2020, 03:51:18 PM
    Have you managed to avoid spoilers during whole month ?

    I have. It's not difficult considering no one in my waking life is reading this book, and it's easy to not click the SPOILER tags when people use them on here.

    This, basically. :D

    EDIT: A few chapters in and so far, so good. A very different experience so far from The Cold Forge (TCF is the only Titan Alien novel I've read, barring the Covenant novelization) but I'm immediately interested in this world and want to see where this goes. It was also a very nice touch, given the structure of this story, to see a map up front at the start.

    EDIT 2: Just finished chapter 15...
    Spoiler
    So the book is actually going to acknowledge there being a difference between the smooth and rigid heads...

    To be honest, I've always just chalked it up to artistic interpretation and don't really bat an eye when a story chooses one option or the other, though I don't mind Cameron's take that the domes eventually molt off with age. I'm going to assume that that's the intention here.
    [close]
  16. HuDaFuK
    Finished it off the other day. My previous comments basically sum it up - it's not among my favourite AVP reads, but it's definitely one of the best. I did enjoy it a lot, just not sure it's one I'll rush back to.

    I absolutely recommend people give it a go though.
  17. HuDaFuK
    Getting towards the end of this now.

    Spoiler
    A hive scene to rival Labyrinth. I've also got to the big twist that explains life on Ataegina. Seriously, this whole section has had me squealing with fanboy joy. Really surprised that the Palatine guards from Female War have returned! Loved the mention of Internecivus raptus too, and the little nods to The Cold Forge. (Although I do wonder how Zachariah could possibly know the staff on the Forge called the Aliens "snatchers"...) Speaking of Zachariah, he's only been in it one chapter, and I love him already.
    [close]

    Any time the Aliens are in this, it's absolutely blowing me away. (I was reading in bed last night, deep in the middle of some tense, creepy Alien shit, and a moth suddenly landed on my face. I practically hit the f*cking ceiling.) I'm less keen on the stuff in between, but that's really no slight against the book and purely down to me not caring for dungeons and dragons stuff. But as I said before, I'm really happy to see someone trying something new with the series. Even if it's not necessarily my bag, I'm glad that there are authors willing to be a bit more experimental and it's certainly among the most memorable Alien reads.
  18. maggieloveshopey
    I don't often post here, but had to break cover to praise this one to the skies. I don't normally have a lot of time for tie-in literature, but Phalanx is gripping, original, tense and exciting. I burnt through the whole thing in less than a day and couldn't put it down.
  19. SM
    QuoteIt's taken a while to get going but I've just got to the first real interactions with Aliens and it's amazingly tense.

    Spoiler
    The stuff in Keflan in the dark is the tensest stuff I've read in any Alien novel.
    [close]
  20. HuDaFuK
    It's taken a while to get going but I've just got to the first real interactions with Aliens and it's amazingly tense.

    Apparently to the point where it had me dreaming about being hunted by Aliens last night :laugh:
« Newer Comments 12 Older Comments »
Facebook Twitter Instagram YouTube RSS Feed