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Katherine Waterston Hasn’t Heard Anything New About Alien: Awakening

It’s been nine months since we last heard from Katherine Waterston regarding Alien: Awakening (aka Alien: Covenant 2). She told the world then that she hadn’t “heard anything in ages.” In a new interview with ThePlaylist (via Bloody Disgusting) Waterston revealed that nothing has progressed since but she’s still very much interested in reprising her role.

Speaking of “Alien,” has there been much talk with Ridley about the next installment?

No, basically. I don’t live in Hollywood, and I’m always usually the last person to know even what’s going on in my own career. So, [I’m] probably not the best person to ask. But I did get some sense of where they thought they might like to take it when we were shooting ‘Covenant,’ and it sounded really interesting. I would be absolutely game to do more if they wanted to have me. But that’s all I know. I’m sure they’ve changed their minds anyway. And there’s been probably loads of different ideas going around and everything. But just in case I spoil something by talking about it, I wouldn’t dare.

 Katherine Waterston Hasn't Heard Anything New About Alien: Awakening

Following Alien: Covenant’s disappointment at the box office, Sir Ridley Scott has spoken a few times about potential directions for the next film and it gave us flashbacks to the times of Prometheus where Scott was sure the Alien was no longer interesting, instead wanting to focus on the A.I of the Alien series.

20th Century Fox just this week confirmed that there was no new Alien film was on the horizon.

“Alien: Blackout,” the mobile survival horror game revealed earlier this week, is part of a broader 20th Century Fox initiative to tell new stories in the franchise around Amanda Ripley. The initiative, branded around the “ReadWatchPlay” slogan, won’t include any other games, nor is it tied to a new feature film, 20th Century Fox’s FoxNext tells Variety.”

Thanks to Immortal Jonesy for the news. Keep a close eye on Alien vs. Predator Galaxy for the latest on all things Alien! You can follow us on FacebookTwitter, Instagram and YouTube to get the latest on your social media walls. You can also join in with fellow Alien fans on our forums!



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  1. SiL
    Your post was talking about how the films were sold, not their actual genres. Prometheus was still an adult R rated sci fi horror that hit ask the same bogey men in space beats,  but they didn't push that in the marketing.
  2. PsyKore
    I disagree. Genre definitely is a factor. Covenant was marketed like a slasher film, to be like a classic Alien movie, with emphasis on gore and the return of the classic creature. Prometheus, even though it's related to the franchise, had much more broader appeal because it wasn't sold like a slasher.
    Then your argument is marketing is important, and I'm not about to question that because it is.

    Dafuq?
  3. Fiendishly Inventive
    Fourth, easily.

    Whereas I think Prometheus and Resurrection fluctuate for last place.
    I hate what Resurrection did to the lore, and the Resurrection of Ripley.
    (Hopefully someday we'll get a film set after Resurrection,
    with everything we knew and loved from the OT back- intact and then
    this complaint would be mostly non-existant, aside from the cloning itself.)
    But as it's self contained thing, it's infinitely more coherent as a film.

    Whereas Prometheus' lore creations I really, really appreciate.
    The Pathogen, Peter Weyland, the timeline, the gear, the ship.
    Aside from the Engineers = Space Jockey concept.
    If the Engineers were established as their own thing,
    that problem would be solved for me personally but
    the film itself, Resurrection's always the victor.

    Alien Trilogy, TCF, Isolation, "Covenant", Resurrection, Prometheus.
  4. Voodoo Magic
    Covenant's a Romanticism; Gothic Horror in space and if you're not willing to approach it like you would that genre of literature, you're not going to be interested.

    If that was the intention, it strikes me as a tad pretentious when viewing the result. Still, I'll try to put myself in that frame of mind the next time I watch it and see if any of my feelings differ towards it.

    How would you rank Covenant among the Ripley trilogy?
  5. Fiendishly Inventive
    The forever salivating dong monster will suffice for me.  :laugh:
    I think it would be cooler if the Alien itself, with the invention
    of the hive structure terraformed an entire celestial body.

    Rather than having David be involved, in that directly.
  6. Necronomicon II
    Yup. Scott's heart lies with David more than anything else, this is clear, yet he still clearly lavishes over scenes like the medbay sequence which is honestly one of the best in the franchise. Just look at that wonderful long-take during the fluting scene, not to mention how much attention he paid personally to the artwork made by Hatton and Hallet. The crew also are much more natural and far less goofy, albeit still foolish, they are at least consistently foolish, unlike the likes of Milburn and Fifield (their deaths are great, however, that helmet melting, mmmm) and their interactions and dialogue are far more natural; no howlers like "I'm here to make money", "I love rocks", "nothing to contribute in the dead body arena", "maybe it's Martian piss", or Vickers' "father", etc. Covenant is a weird hybrid of often subverted Alien tropes and a Victorian Gothic horror ala Frankenstein, Dracula, etc, the entire second act is just...weird, but provocative. The Bosch-esque necropolis visually is far more rich and striking than the lifeless terrain on LV-223, and the revelation that the titular creature and its life cycle reflects a deliberate perversion of human sexuality by a sterile machine going mad while demystifying, is bold and consistent thematically with Giger's aesthetic.  There's also the through-line of Wagner combined with Shelley's poem that makes it much more thematically succinct and coherent than Prometheus overall. 

    David's motivations are clearly delineated from the opening scene, also; the creator/creation dynamic is more clearly presented with Weyland and David's dialogue exchange and interaction there and it also sets up Milton's influence throughout - the white room being heaven, Weyland being the Creator and David being the most brilliant angel that threatens his throne, etc.

    Covenant asks the question - what if the Devil or Frankenstein's monster could create? I for one NEED to see David's planet of the juicy dongs.  ;D 
  7. Fiendishly Inventive
    The cast isn't superior to Prometheus' but they're better acted and directed.

    The editing in Prometheus is completely f**ked, Covenant's is not.

    Covenant knows what it is, Prometheus does not.

    Nah, Covenant- aside from the Xenomorph in the ship at the end being somewhat lacklustre but not always- is a superior film.
    (when it's standing up and moving around slowly like a man it's pretty fantastic and so is the visuals of the atmospheric decompression.)
    Aside from some of the production design of the human crafts, spacesuits and weaponry which I thought were much more interesting looking in Prometheus, Covenant is much, much better film it's probably just that because Prometheus doesn't know what it's about- in your head you can define it therefore in whatever way you want, whereas Covenant actually has a strong narrative theme. As many smarter than me have said, Covenant's a Romanticism; Gothic Horror in space and if you're not willing to approach it like you would that genre of literature, you're not going to be interested.
  8. Voodoo Magic
    Lacklustre trailers, title.
    With the awareness that Prometheus was crap, a sense of "Oh you won't fool me this time, Ridley Scott!" was in the air,
    which most likely contributed to it's decrease in commercial success despite IMO, being a superior film in the narrative.

    While Prometheus had just a wonderful, thrilling final trailer, I would agree Covenant trailers were very lackluster.  I honestly would equate that result to the film itself feeling lackluster. Watching Covenant gives me the feeling that Ridley Scott was just going through the motions, and his heart was no longer in it, if that makes any sense.

    I'm not at all calling Prometheus a perfect film, but for me, nothing is superior in Covenant over Prometheus. From casting, to acting, to the narrative, to pacing and direction, Covenant just fails in almost every comparison.
  9. SiL
    It is my opinion that Covenant's script is superior to Prometheus'
    "Oh you won't fool me this time, Ridley Scott!" is in reference to
    Prometheus' script, and therefore a lack of anticipation towards 2017's Alien.
    Not your list.

    Not to say I hate the script, it's just that it's definitely a weak point of the film.
    A bad script is a fairly strong argument to say it's a bad film, wouldn't you agree? ;D
  10. Fiendishly Inventive
    Lacklustre trailers, title.
    With the awareness that Prometheus was crap, a sense of "Oh you won't fool me this time, Ridley Scott!" was in the air,
    which most likely contributed to it's decrease in commercial success despite IMO, being a superior film in the narrative.
    And a concept that we'd seen before.
    (From the trailers perspective.)

    It's more easy to see why audiences didn't have a interest when you compare it to what Prometheus did have.

    Prometheus' the return of Ridley Scott to Sci-Fi, a cast of hot new stars and an return to sense of legitimacy in that Prometheus was described as it's own thing in the Alien Universe, the complete opposite of the abortion of AVP/AVPR people had suffered five years prior- that had little to do with the series history creatively, aesthetically, narratively or thematically beyond the creature itself. 
  11. Evanus
    Then why Covenant didn't do well a the box office?


    Yeah, marketing was huge. But Fox are silly though; putting huge amounts of money into and expecting big financial results for a nihilistic horror monster film no one is taking their kids or grandparents to see. It still did well considering the franchise's reputation and its restrictions as a genre, however.

    I disagree. Genre definitely is a factor. Covenant was marketed like a slasher film, to be like a classic Alien movie, with emphasis on gore and the return of the classic creature. Prometheus, even though it's related to the franchise, had much more broader appeal because it wasn't sold like a slasher.

    Covenant is not the most digestible or pithy sub-title for the general movie going public. Add in weird scenes of erotic fluting/misanthropy and it was never going to light up the box-office. All things considered it did ok.
  12. Evanus
    I don't think the quality of a film is the deciding factor when it comes to how good it does at the box office.

    Quality is not just how the movie looks. Quality for me is the story itself with its characters, dialogues, tension, pacing and so on. Quality in overall. Prometheus and Covenant don't have that quality.
    Sure..? But that doesn't mean that's why Covenant didn't do well at the box office.
  13. Ingwar
    Genre isn't the main factor, however it affects movie's box office. The most important thing is quality which is mainly based (at least in Scott's case) upon the script. Give Ridley great script and he'll nail it: Gladiator, Kingdom of Heaven, American Gangster or The Marian.
  14. Necronomicon II
    Covenant is not the most digestible or pithy sub-title for the general movie going public. Add in weird scenes of erotic fluting/misanthropy and it was never going to light up the box-office. All things considered it did ok.
  15. SiL
    I disagree. Genre definitely is a factor. Covenant was marketed like a slasher film, to be like a classic Alien movie, with emphasis on gore and the return of the classic creature. Prometheus, even though it's related to the franchise, had much more broader appeal because it wasn't sold like a slasher.
    Then your argument is marketing is important, and I'm not about to question that because it is.

    We could also argue whether people simply felt Covenant was a worse movie, but that's harder to quantify.
  16. PsyKore
    And none of this changes the fact they put huge amounts of money into a nihilistic monster movie and got that money back. Clearly the genre isn't the issue.

    I disagree. Genre definitely is a factor. Covenant was marketed like a slasher film, to be like a classic Alien movie, with emphasis on gore and the return of the classic creature. Prometheus, even though it's related to the franchise, had much more broader appeal because it wasn't sold like a slasher.
  17. SiL
    And none of this changes the fact they put huge amounts of money into a nihilistic monster movie and got that money back. Clearly the genre isn't the issue.
  18. Huggs
    I'd wager a lot of the Prometheus money was hype because it was the first film movie set strictly in the Alien universe (non AVP) since Resurrection and also saw the return of the original director. Hell, I almost went to see it, and I hadn't been to the theater since Aladdin at that point. Even my father was asking if I was going to see the "new alien movie".
  19. PsyKore
    Yeah, marketing was huge. But Fox are silly though; putting huge amounts of money into and expecting big financial results for a nihilistic horror monster film no one is taking their kids or grandparents to see. It still did well considering the franchise's reputation and its restrictions as a genre, however.
    Prometheus did it and did well financially.

    Granted. But not under the 'Alien' name.
  20. SiL
    Yeah, marketing was huge. But Fox are silly though; putting huge amounts of money into and expecting big financial results for a nihilistic horror monster film no one is taking their kids or grandparents to see. It still did well considering the franchise's reputation and its restrictions as a genre, however.
    Prometheus did it and did well financially.
  21. PsyKore
    Yeah, marketing was huge. But Fox are silly though; putting huge amounts of money into and expecting big financial results for a nihilistic horror monster film no one is taking their kids or grandparents to see. It still did well considering the franchise's reputation and its restrictions as a genre, however.

    Alien and Aliens became famous (don't know if they were actual blockbusters in their time) and made money because they were good films. Nowadays they try to do it the other way around.
  22. yhe1
    Just like Alien Resurrection hinted at a sequel back in 1997, 20th Century Fox took a look at box office receipts and hit the cancellation button.
    When the Alien Covenant bombed, they did the same thing. 
    The Alien / Prometheus prequel time-line is dead, effectively.
    When we eventually do see the Alien franchise return to the big screen (and I'm convinced it will happen), it won't a continuation of what Ridley Scott had planned (although I would have loved to have seen what David did next).  I think they'll instead revisit the Ripley character, or, most likely, her daughter, Amanda.
    Reduce the budget, take the franchise back to it's horror-house roots.  That's what I think is more likely.


    I understand the disappointment but AC did not bomb. It underperformed.
    A box office “bomb” is when a movie can’t make double the production budget at the box office. (Studios get about 1/2 of box office money partly through strange Hollywood accounting.)
    So a “bomb” can’t even pay for its production budget (and make up other costs through streaming, cable, disk sales).
    - Examples of box office bombs; “Solo: A Star Wars Story”, “Star Trek Beyond”, “Green Lantern”, “John Carter”.

    “Alien Covenant” had a Production Budget = $97 million.
    Total box office = $240,891,763.
    AC made 2.48 times its production budget.
    That’s about the same ratio as “Batman Begins” (box office 2.49 times the production budget); also not a bomb.

    The difference is that in the past Fox and Warner Brothers would do sequels for underperforming films.
    Disney which is now in charge of Fox films, wants blockbusters. Alien and Predator movies haven’t been blockbusters for decades.

    ;)


    It is a bomb because the marketing for AC was really expensive.
  23. bb-15
    Just like Alien Resurrection hinted at a sequel back in 1997, 20th Century Fox took a look at box office receipts and hit the cancellation button.
    When the Alien Covenant bombed, they did the same thing. 
    The Alien / Prometheus prequel time-line is dead, effectively.
    When we eventually do see the Alien franchise return to the big screen (and I'm convinced it will happen), it won't a continuation of what Ridley Scott had planned (although I would have loved to have seen what David did next).  I think they'll instead revisit the Ripley character, or, most likely, her daughter, Amanda.
    Reduce the budget, take the franchise back to it's horror-house roots.  That's what I think is more likely.

    I understand the disappointment but AC did not bomb. It underperformed.
    A box office “bomb” is when a movie can’t make double the production budget at the box office. (Studios get about 1/2 of box office money partly through strange Hollywood accounting.)
    So a “bomb” can’t even pay for its production budget (and make up other costs through streaming, cable, disk sales).
    - Examples of box office bombs; “Solo: A Star Wars Story”, “Star Trek Beyond”, “Green Lantern”, “John Carter”.

    “Alien Covenant” had a Production Budget = $97 million.
    Total box office = $240,891,763.
    AC made 2.48 times its production budget.
    That’s about the same ratio as “Batman Begins” (box office 2.49 times the production budget); also not a bomb.

    The difference is that in the past Fox and Warner Brothers would do sequels for underperforming films.
    Disney which is now in charge of Fox films, wants blockbusters. Alien and Predator movies haven’t been blockbusters for decades.

    ;)
  24. Corporal Hicks
    I don't mind the idea of him with some Engineer-technology. I had expected (hoped) he'd come back in Covenant with some funky Engineer body.

    That would have looked f'king ridiculous. Can you imagine a little pinheaded David noggin mounted on top of a humongous Engineer body?  :laugh:

    I'm sure he'd have figured out a way to make it more aesthetically pleasing to him. 
  25. TheSailingRabbit
    valleys and valleys of juicy dongs

    Just calling them dongs, would've sufficed.  ;D

    "If you've got a hankerin' for something different, then come on down to Planet David, home of the Juicy Dong".

    "Sink your canines into a Colonist Combo Meal, and wash it all down with a refreshingly large Black Goo Cola."

    "Trying to watch your figure? Can't decide what you want? Try something from our new Neurosis Menu. You'll never believe it, or anything else again".

    Sponsored by Club Giger.
  26. Huggs
    valleys and valleys of juicy dongs

    Just calling them dongs, would've sufficed.  ;D

    "If you've got a hankerin' for something different, then come on down to Planet David, home of the Juicy Dong".

    "Sink your canines into a Colonist Combo Meal, and wash it all down with a refreshingly large Black Goo Cola."

    "Trying to watch your figure? Can't decide what you want? Try something from our new Neurosis Menu. You'll never believe it, or anything else again".
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