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AvP Galaxy Reviews Alien: Covenant – David’s Drawings

An undeniable truth about the Alien franchise – whether that be the films or the comics – is that it always attracts the attention of many incredibly talented artists. Without the work of H.R Giger or Ron Cobb or Mobius, Alien would not have been the success and lasting cultural icon that it has become.

Alien: Covenant was also a showcase of many talented artists. Whether it’s Steve Messing, Carlos Huante or Wayne Hagg, Sir Ridley Scott’s latest Alien film was not void of artistic talent. And now, two of Covenant’s talented artist have the opportunity to showcase the literally hundreds of pieces of artwork they created for the film.

Alien: Covenant – David’s Drawings is a collection of over two hundred pieces of artwork created by Matt Hatton and Dane Hallett to visually depict David’s sad descent into robotic insanity. Their art can be seen decorating the walls of the citadel inside the Engineer necropolis. And this is a book I’ve been excited for ever since Matt and Dane first spoke of it!

 AvP Galaxy Reviews Alien: Covenant - David's Drawings

Click here to continue reading the full review.

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Comments: 36
  1. Darwinsgirl
    Your welcome. I forgot to mention the film is from 1953. I read the article and it is not used in the text only the caption. I'm thinking the term in this context is from that era not 1978. The origin is much older according to a Wikipedia definition. I didn't save it as my interest in the ALIEN connection.
  2. Darwinsgirl
    Egg, Facehugger, Chestburster aren't terribly scientific though.

    Don't get me started on how "Xenomorph" can apply to a variety of creatures, contextually within Aliens & A3 it works because it's referred to as "A Xenomorph" which would be correct. But the miscommunication that it's
    "The Xenomorph" from then onwards is irritating to say the least.

    Give me half an hour or there abouts and I could make more suitable threatening names with the Latin dictionary.
    The Colonial Marines Tech Manual clarifies that "xenomorph" is, as you guessed, a USCM term that applies to any extraterrestrial organism that they don't know the capabilities of.
    It's just that James Cameron chose such a unique but memorable word that it got permanently linked with the capital-A Alien as another name for it, independent of its in-context meaning.
    If Cameron had used the word "extraterrestrial" in place of "xenomorph", we wouldn't even be having this conversation. :P

    I wasn't sure where to post this. Here is a scan of a picture of a "xenomorph" from an article in the Feb.1978 issue of "Space Wars". I originally thought James Cameron created the term till I saw this article. So my search began looking for other use of this term. I got the film from the library watched it 3 times (in case I nodded off during viewing  ;)) also the special feature on the film. Xenomorph was not used in the movie "It Came From Outer Space". The original story the film was taken from was written by Ray Bradbury. There's a lovely book out about Ray Bradbury's story but its a limited edition the cheapest copy I found was $60 on ebay. So I will see if I can locate a copy via the library. Maybe in some future Q & A with James Cameron someone might ask where he first came across the term? :)
  3. muthur9000
    I don't remember that being mentioned in there? Though I do remember someone suggesting that idea, but how the hell does the black goo reanimate anything all of a sudden?  :laugh:

    They introduced reanimation in Prometheus. A sort of nod to Frankenstein.

    Shameless plug of my analysis of David's Drawings/Covenant Blu-ray

    https://yutani.blog/2018/10/03/flora-cobra-lily/

    & Alex White write it.

    I have been petitioning he write a sequel to The Cold Forge... Now I want to drop that for him to write a novel about David and Shaw going to Planet 4.

    I really do love this art book. It just adds so much to the tone of the movie. The book generates a unique atmosphere, a sense of mystery and dread.

    I long for a novel about David, Shaw and the 10 years between Prometheus and Covenant...

    Unfortunately no fanfics really come close to how crazy and scary it would be to be trapped with David on a dead planet.
  4. Xenomrph
    Hell yes! That man knows how to write characters superbly well. Of course there's no guarantee that it would be as good as The Cold Forge, but if it was, it'd be kinda funny to get a prequel tie-in novel that's written better than the prequels themselves.     :laugh:
    Stuff that’s better than the source material isn’t unheard of - I’ve had a running joke that one of my top videogames that I’d like to see adapted into a movie is ‘X-Men Origins: Wolverine’. :P
  5. Still Collating...
    Hell yes! That man knows how to write characters superbly well. Of course there's no guarantee that it would be as good as The Cold Forge, but if it was, it'd be kinda funny to get a prequel tie-in novel that's written better than the prequels themselves.     :laugh:
  6. Corporal Hicks
    I really do love this art book. It just adds so much to the tone of the movie. The book generates a unique atmosphere, a sense of mystery and dread.

    I long for a novel about David, Shaw and the 10 years between Prometheus and Covenant...
    I was really hoping that's what the Covenant prequel novel was going to be.

    Welp.

    You and the rest of us!

    & Alex White write it.


    https://media1.tenor.com/images/fb83a4334835eaea5f81970f387e11a9/tenor.gif
  7. Still Collating...
    I really do love this art book. It just adds so much to the tone of the movie. The book generates a unique atmosphere, a sense of mystery and dread.

    I long for a novel about David, Shaw and the 10 years between Prometheus and Covenant...
  8. muthur9000
    Finished reading it. I actually preferred the interview book compared to the other in terms of layout and presentation. I wish they'd have presented his drawings like that with separate printed captions. It wasn't always clear what the pictures were and how David managed to go from studying plants to creating Neomorphs and Xenomorphs. How did he even find hosts for them in order to draw them?

    Didn't he reanimate them?
  9. Darkness
    Finished reading it. I actually preferred the interview book compared to the other in terms of layout and presentation. I wish they'd have presented his drawings like that with separate printed captions. It wasn't always clear what the pictures were and how David managed to go from studying plants to creating Neomorphs and Xenomorphs. How did he even find hosts for them in order to draw them?
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