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Dark Horse Comics Announce Aliens: Dust to Dust!

We first heard the title Dust to Dust back in November but now Dark Horse Comics has officially announced the new Aliens series, Aliens: Dust to Dust! Like with the recently wrapped Aliens: Dead Orbit, the writing and art duties of Dust to Dust will be handled by a single person. In this case, the talent behind the new series is Gabriel Hardman.

“In deep space, the Trono colony on the planet LV-871 finds itself under attack by mysterious and deadly creatures of unknown origin. Emergency evacuations are ordered and shuttles are taking off as the massacre sweeps the colony. All that stands between 12-year-old Maxon and his mom making it to the safety of the spaceport is a horde of Aliens!”

 Dark Horse Comics Announce Aliens: Dust to Dust!

Cover art for the first issue by Gabriel Hardman.

Hardman has previously worked on Alien comics, providing cover artwork for the Aliens/Vampirella crossover series from 2015/2016. Hardman has worked on several different franchises including Planet of the Apes, Green Lantern and previously with Dark Horse on Star Wars: Legacy Volume 2. He also has credits in the film industry as a storyboard artist on films such as Inception, Interstellar and Tropic Thunder.

Be sure to head on over to Comic Book Resources to check out the full announcement with includes an interview with Hardman about Dust to Dust!

“How did you arrive at the story you’re telling in Aliens: Dust to Dust? It appears to be a mother-son story at its emotional core.

I was actually inspired to tell the story from the point of view of a 12-year-old boy in large part because that’s the age I was when first exposed to Aliens. But also because I didn’t want to write about Marines or anyone who seems like they could stand up to the Xenomorphs. Kids lack power — they lack agency. I wanted to throw this boy into extraordinarily scary and difficult circumstances and force him to navigate it. And not tell it from the parent’s perspective, but the kid’s.”

 Dark Horse Comics Announce Aliens: Dust to Dust!

Variant cover art for the first issue.

Aliens: Dust to Dust will be a limited 4 issue run mini-series that launches just before Aliens Day on April 24th!

Thanks to Ultramorph for the heads-up! Keep a close eye on Alien vs. Predator Galaxy for the latest Alien and Predator literature news! You can follow us on FacebookTwitter and Instagram to get the latest on your social media walls. You can also join in with fellow Alien and Predator fans on our forums!



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  1. razeak
    Maybe the system is like nitrous booster on a car. Maybe she purged the system when she pressed the button. Maybe it takes a second press to actually release it.


    As for the comic, I loved the art. The story was good overall.
  2. Xenomrph
    I really wish the scene was on youtube somewhere, I feel like I'd make a better argument (or, you know, just flat-out concede :P ) if my memory of the scene was better. The closest I could find on youtube starts, like, immediately after the Alien gets sprayed.

    Maybe tomorrow after work I'll get off my lazy ass and pop the bluray into the bluray player.
  3. SiL
    Quote from: Xenomrph on Jan 23, 2019, 03:59:16 AM
    That's my point - she hits it with a pressurized jet of something, we don't know if it's what she sprayed, or the temperature/pressure of what she sprayed. Like I said, correlation =/= causation.
    It doesn't come out at high pressure. There's an initial kick, which doesn't bother the Alien. It's after a moment it starts freaking out.

    QuoteIt seems like a pretty mind-blowing safety oversight if any idiot can release the stuff into an enclosed environment with the push of a button and your best solution is "hope you're in the vacuum of space and already suited up, open the airlock, and hope you don't die". :P
    Cos the button's just sitting out in the open and not under a panel that requires several button presses to open :P

    If it were the crew of the Prometheus, though...
  4. Xenomrph
    Quote from: SiL on Jan 23, 2019, 03:42:36 AM
    Quote from: Xenomrph on Jan 23, 2019, 03:25:01 AM
    I could be mis-remembering (I tried to find the clip on youtube to refresh my memory) but doesn't she try different valves and the third one is a much higher intensity and much closer to the Alien? That's why I figured the Alien got provoked.
    Rewatching, the first two just don't hit it. They come out of valves near the ceiling and vent into the main chamber.
    That's my point - she hits it with a pressurized jet of something, we don't know if it's what she sprayed, or the temperature/pressure of what she sprayed. Like I said, correlation =/= causation.

    Quote from: SiL on Jan 23, 2019, 03:42:36 AM
    Quote(and why on earth would there be a valve to open such a nasty chemical like that into the pressurized environment of the Narcissus' open air, and why wasn't Ripley affected by it?).
    Decontamination, maybe.
    I, uh
    I'm not sure decontamination works by spraying a highly contaminating substance into an area. Like, the hazmat link you provided said that if you're afraid you spilled any of it, you should evacuate a pretty wide area and call professionals to decontaminate the stuff. It seems like a pretty mind-blowing safety oversight if any idiot can release the stuff into an enclosed environment with the push of a button and your best solution is "hope you're in the vacuum of space and already suited up, open the airlock, and hope you don't die". :P

    Quote from: SiL on Jan 23, 2019, 03:42:36 AM
    Quoteand that every tiny detail we spot might not be meant to be taken literally. Otherwise, I guess the pulse rifle doesn't fire "caseless" ammunition, the APC is very literally bigger on the inside than it is on the outside, and the Queen's ovipositor has genuine incandescent light bulbs inside it.
    They're not really analogous, though. The things you listed after are goofs or filmmaking slight of hand. Maybe in the future some savvy business person started selling excess Nitrosyl Chloride as a decontaminant in the case you find a deadly alien organism (It's not just toxic, it's highly irritant to mucous membranes -- and we know the Alien is oh so mucousy!)

    Like Dallas referring to "molecular acid". All acid is molecular. Maybe it's a thing in the future.

    Weird, yes -- wrong, only if you need it to be to win an argument :P
    Like I said, I'm not really against the idea but I've got a nagging voice in my head saying we might be reading into an easter egg a bit too much. I'm not saying you're ultimately wrong, especially since the more I think about it the more I like your idea, I'm just expressing my feelings (and exploring the full ramifications of your idea). :)

    Quote from: Prez on Jan 23, 2019, 03:51:57 AM
    I always took it as Ripley was just releasing steam and then hit the right valve that caused ol Big Chap to get out of his comfy sleeping nook.
    Exactly. I'm fairly confident that's what 99% of audience members thought when they watched that scene. It doesn't mean they're right, but the filmmaking language present is still worth noting.
  5. SiL
    Quote from: Xenomrph on Jan 23, 2019, 03:25:01 AM
    I could be mis-remembering (I tried to find the clip on youtube to refresh my memory) but doesn't she try different valves and the third one is a much higher intensity and much closer to the Alien? That's why I figured the Alien got provoked.
    Rewatching, the first two just don't hit it. They come out of valves near the ceiling and vent into the main chamber.

    Quote(and why on earth would there be a valve to open such a nasty chemical like that into the pressurized environment of the Narcissus' open air, and why wasn't Ripley affected by it?).
    Decontamination, maybe.

    As to why she's not affected, dude. She's in a space suit, and

    Quotedoes open the airlock and vent the cabin's atmosphere into space,

    Quotebut I don't know if the chemical leaves behind residue that could still be present after everything is re-pressurized.
    The dissolve allows you to put as much time between blasting the Alien and taking off the suit as needed to make sure everything's clean.

    Quoteand that every tiny detail we spot might not be meant to be taken literally. Otherwise, I guess the pulse rifle doesn't fire "caseless" ammunition, the APC is very literally bigger on the inside than it is on the outside, and the Queen's ovipositor has genuine incandescent light bulbs inside it.
    They're not really analogous, though. The things you listed after are goofs or filmmaking slight of hand. Maybe in the future some savvy business person started selling excess Nitrosyl Chloride as a decontaminant in the case you find a deadly alien organism (It's not just toxic, it's highly irritant to mucous membranes -- and we know the Alien is oh so mucousy!)

    Like Dallas referring to "molecular acid". All acid is molecular. Maybe it's a thing in the future.

    Weird, yes -- wrong, only if you need it to be to win an argument :P

    QuoteI'm more of playing devil's advocate and looking at other ideas before jumping to a conclusion.
    I don't see how "She sprays it with a toxic chemical that burns mucous membranes and it reacts, ergo it is affected by the toxic chemical" is jumping to a conclusion...
  6. Xenomrph
    Quote from: SiL on Jan 22, 2019, 11:04:29 AM
    Quote from: Xenomrph on Jan 22, 2019, 10:36:58 AM
    Fair point I suppose, just trying to acknowledge other potential explanations.
    Those would only be potential explanations if there was any suggestion those factors were in play. There isn't. She hits it with several chemicals, nothing; bug spray, it freaks out. No sign it's painfully high pressure, no indication it's an extreme temperature.
    I could be mis-remembering (I tried to find the clip on youtube to refresh my memory) but doesn't she try different valves and the third one is a much higher intensity and much closer to the Alien? That's why I figured the Alien got provoked.

    Think about it this way: only mega-turbo-fans who checked the movie frame-by-frame even know that Ripley sprayed the Alien with some special chemical at all (and why on earth would there be a valve to open such a nasty chemical like that into the pressurized environment of the Narcissus' open air, and why wasn't Ripley affected by it?). Your average viewer is going to think the Alien got blasted with air or something, because the movie doesn't convey that what she's spraying is anything special.

    Quote from: SiL on Jan 22, 2019, 11:04:29 AMThe chemical she sprays that gets the reaction is Nitrosyl Chloride. It's a nasty f**kin' chemical. It's also supposed to be yellow.
    Based on the fact that what she sprays isn't yellow, and she doesn't poison herself, perhaps it isn't that chemical?

    Granted she does open the airlock and vent the cabin's atmosphere into space, but I don't know if the chemical leaves behind residue that could still be present after everything is re-pressurized. Again, just considering other variables.

    I'm looking up Nitrosyl Chloride and I'm trying to figure out why such a thing is present on the ship at all. Like, wikipedia tells me that it's used to combine with other chemicals to fabricate the polymer Nylon 6, and that appears to be its only use. ???

    I mean it's a cool detail that the label for the button Ripley pushes means something in real terms, and it's a neat idea for eagle-eyed viewers (who, in 1979 when the movie came out, had no way to go frame-by-frame through the movie :P ) that maybe whatever she sprayed the Alien with actually affected it. But part of me thinks it might just be an easter egg, and that every tiny detail we spot might not be meant to be taken literally. Otherwise, I guess the pulse rifle doesn't fire "caseless" ammunition, the APC is very literally bigger on the inside than it is on the outside, and the Queen's ovipositor has genuine incandescent light bulbs inside it.

    Like I'm with you that the Alien could be susceptible to specific chemicals - it's even an idea that gets tossed around in the EU (and "the juice", the Alien-dissolving chemical from Xenogenesis, is yellow-green if I remember right), and I think it could be a neat idea that Ripley stumbled across one by accident, I'm more of playing devil's advocate and looking at other ideas before jumping to a conclusion.
  7. SiL
    Hicks, Ripley and the rest of the marines were down for it. Burke was more concerned about the Aliens than the colony. The Nostromo crew didn't blow the ship sooner because of the life boats.
  8. The Kurgan
    Quote from: The Cruentus on Jan 21, 2019, 03:18:30 PM
    Only if you have aliens keep encountering that group. And even then there is ways around it, either the alien adapts and learns to avoid it or becomes resistent to it, or maybe have someone with a keen interest in the aliens sabotage those who would effectively destroy them.

    Also you could just have average joes encounter the alien just like the first film. There would be no defence against the creature then.

    All true. I just prefer my aliens to be more of a bigger scale threat than only a threat to unprepared average joes. All personal preference of course.
    I like the adaption angle though. That would be a good solution for me  :)

    Quote from: SiL on Jan 22, 2019, 12:16:16 AM
    Quote from: The Kurgan on Jan 21, 2019, 03:04:17 PM
    How not so?

    As soon as you can easily kill something without collateral damage or drawbacks it becomes more of an inconvenience than a real threat.
    But in the movies people are willing to blow up the colonies and ships anyway. The real damage is the loss of life, not property.

    Hicks was, but guys like him don't usually call the shots. And if you nuke a colony, its much more than mere property damage. You destroy something that took decades to build and establish.

    I prefer the aliens to be like a particular resistent infection. If it took hold, there is no other way to cut off the entire affected limb to assure survival.
    Maybe that's a bit of an exaggeration to what an organism like the aliens could do "realistically" speaking, but i very much would prefer it that way.
  9. SiL
    Quote from: Xenomrph on Jan 22, 2019, 10:36:58 AM
    Fair point I suppose, just trying to acknowledge other potential explanations.
    Those would only be potential explanations if there was any suggestion those factors were in play. There isn't. She hits it with several chemicals, nothing; bug spray, it freaks out. No sign it's painfully high pressure, no indication it's an extreme temperature.

    QuoteCorrelation does not equal causation, after all.
    That's a perfectly true statement, but it's not really relevant here. There's pretty clear cause and effect. It's like watching someone get splashed with water and saying "but maybe their shirt is wet because it was a hot day and they were sweaty" :P

    EDIT

    Actually, I was wrong. I can't find where it's used as a pesticide.

    The chemical she sprays that gets the reaction is Nitrosyl Chloride. It's a nasty f**kin' chemical. It's also supposed to be yellow.

    https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/compound/nitrosyl_chloride#section=Hazards-Identification
    QuoteGas is highly toxic. Inhalation causes severe irritation of respiratory tract and damage to mucous membranes. Delayed effects, which include severe pulmonary edema, may not be apparent for several hours. (USCG, 1999)
    from CAMEO Chemicals
    Corrosive, Reactive - 1st degree
  10. Xenomrph
    Quote from: SiL on Jan 22, 2019, 04:07:20 AM
    It doesn't shoot out much harder than the others and you'd need to prove it's spraying hot pesticide (or cold?) for some reason -- but that's starting to feel more like sticking fingers in ears saying "Nya nya nya can't hear you they aren't bothered by toxic gases" than an actual argument :-\
    Fair point I suppose, just trying to acknowledge other potential explanations. Correlation does not equal causation, after all.
  11. SiL
    It doesn't shoot out much harder than the others and you'd need to prove it's spraying hot pesticide (or cold?) for some reason -- but that's starting to feel more like sticking fingers in ears saying "Nya nya nya can't hear you they aren't bothered by toxic gases" than an actual argument :-\
  12. Xenomrph
    Quote from: SiL on Jan 21, 2019, 01:10:40 PM
    QuoteBut still, i think effective chemical weapons are too much of an "I win" button.
    "Nuking the site from orbit" isn't? ???

    QuoteWasn't it the temperature that startled the Alien? I thought it was either hot steam or some coolant not something toxic. But i may misremember the details.
    It's a small detail, but you can actually read the chemical compound on the button she presses. When you look it up, you see it's commonly used as an insecticide. She's basically spraying all of the decontamination chemicals onto the Alien and seeing which one works.

    I imagine it was a gag by the prop designers but hey, it's in the film.
    Huh, you learn something new every day. :)

    That said, it could still be the temperature or pressure of whatever she was spraying out and not necessarily the chemical itself that drove out the Alien.
  13. The Old One
    I've always thought the greatest
    threat of the Alien is one that has
    not been exploited to it's fullest
    on film and that's how quickly they
    change, even Ridley Scott had it in
    mind for the first film. Describing
    the Alien as a parasite jumping
    from one creature to the next as
    parasites do and changing in the
    process. What if it's like the Borg
    but the adaptive capability is
    more of a gradual process?
  14. The Cruentus
    Only if you have aliens keep encountering that group. And even then there is ways around it, either the alien adapts and learns to avoid it or becomes resistent to it, or maybe have someone with a keen interest in the aliens sabotage those who would effectively destroy them.

    Also you could just have average joes encounter the alien just like the first film. There would be no defence against the creature then.
  15. The Cruentus
    How so?  Gas and chemicals kill a lot of things, doesn't mean what they kill is not dangerous nor does it make them "neutered".
    Human's advantage over Aliens is their intelligence and strategy, I see no issue in humans finding more effective ways to kill aliens without collateral damage. I agree there should always be a threat and the danger should never go away but colonial marine and pulse rifles is just going to get old and its not long term effectiveness.
  16. The Kurgan
    Quote from: The Cruentus on Jan 21, 2019, 01:57:01 PM
    Quote from: The Kurgan on Jan 20, 2019, 02:10:23 PM
    Quote from: SiL on Jan 20, 2019, 11:03:50 AM
    There's really no reason to assume they don't breathe, or that it's some kind of weakness. Evidence pretty clearly points to the fact they breathe. But also that they are super good at holding their breath.

    It is a weakness. They can only operate for extended time in environments where they can breath, you could bring poison into their body over their respiratory system, you could suffocate them...

    I think it severely limits their adaptability, even if they could breath nearly anything.

    Kurgan, the aliens are not meant to be invincible supernatural monsters, they have weaknesses and there is absolutely nothing wrong with that. They fear fire, they can be killed with any sharp objects as well blunt so long as there is enough force behind it,. They are still stronger and faster than humans and more dangerous than most animals on earth, if not all because their acid is great deterrant against piercing their bodies. A few weaknesses doesn't stop them from being one of the greatest threats about nor any less bad*ss.


    Sure, nothing wrong with that.

    But there are risks and a drawbacks to all of that. Sure you can blow up the colony or space station or the lab, but you lose the whole thing if you do that. Sure you can send troops to fight them off, but you lose lives and equipment in the progress.

    If you could just pump some gas through a space station, colony, lab or hive, you kill them off with no drawbacks and risks at all. I don't think the aliens should be invulnerable, not at all. But having them be affected easily by chemical weapons neuters them way to much IMO.
  17. The Cruentus
    Quote from: The Kurgan on Jan 20, 2019, 02:10:23 PM
    Quote from: SiL on Jan 20, 2019, 11:03:50 AM
    There's really no reason to assume they don't breathe, or that it's some kind of weakness. Evidence pretty clearly points to the fact they breathe. But also that they are super good at holding their breath.

    It is a weakness. They can only operate for extended time in environments where they can breath, you could bring poison into their body over their respiratory system, you could suffocate them...

    I think it severely limits their adaptability, even if they could breath nearly anything.

    Kurgan, the aliens are not meant to be invincible supernatural monsters, they have weaknesses and there is absolutely nothing wrong with that. They fear fire, they can be killed with any sharp objects as well blunt so long as there is enough force behind it,. They are still stronger and faster than humans and more dangerous than most animals on earth, if not all because their acid is great deterrant against piercing their bodies. A few weaknesses doesn't stop them from being one of the greatest threats about nor any less bad*ss.

  18. SiL
    Quote from: The Kurgan on Jan 21, 2019, 01:22:46 PM
    Not quite. If you nuke the whole thing, you lose as much, your colony is gone. If you gas the place, you clean up and all is good. Also you could pump gas in hives or space stations or wherever to support troops in hazmat suits, could use it to make alien breakouts in labs  practically impossible etc.

    Chemical weapons have a much broader applicability than just blowing the place up.
    But again, if you try to gas them, they just leave. They can't outrun a nuke.
  19. The Kurgan
    Quote from: SiL on Jan 21, 2019, 01:10:40 PM
    QuoteBut still, i think effective chemical weapons are too much of an "I win" button.
    "Nuking the site from orbit" isn't? ???

    Not quite. If you nuke the whole thing, you lose as much, your colony is gone. If you gas the place, you clean up and all is good. Also you could pump gas in hives or space stations or wherever to support troops in hazmat suits, could use it to make alien breakouts in labs  practically impossible etc.

    Chemical weapons have a much broader applicability than just blowing the place up.

    Quote from: SiL on Jan 21, 2019, 01:10:40 PM
    QuoteWasn't it the temperature that startled the Alien? I thought it was either hot steam or some coolant not something toxic. But i may misremember the details.

    Quote from: SiL on Jan 21, 2019, 01:10:40 PM
    It's a small detail, but you can actually read the chemical compound on the button she presses. When you look it up, you see it's commonly used as an insecticide. She's basically spraying all of the decontamination chemicals onto the Alien and seeing which one works.

    I imagine it was a gag by the prop designers but hey, it's in the film.

    Good eye, well than we have precedent that whatever it was exactly was at least pretty unpleasant for it.
  20. SiL
    QuoteBut still, i think effective chemical weapons are too much of an "I win" button.
    "Nuking the site from orbit" isn't? ???

    QuoteWasn't it the temperature that startled the Alien? I thought it was either hot steam or some coolant not something toxic. But i may misremember the details.
    It's a small detail, but you can actually read the chemical compound on the button she presses. When you look it up, you see it's commonly used as an insecticide. She's basically spraying all of the decontamination chemicals onto the Alien and seeing which one works.

    I imagine it was a gag by the prop designers but hey, it's in the film.
  21. The Kurgan
    Quote from: SiL on Jan 21, 2019, 01:00:33 PM
    Quote from: The Kurgan on Jan 21, 2019, 12:50:39 PM
    I don't think it's quite the same. I see no problem in guns beeing able the kill an alien, but if you could just gas or poison them big scale, that would significantly decrease their threat. At least for me.

    Have an infection? Just gas the colony with minimal structural damage, wait until it dispenses or neutralize it, and the whole thing is as good as new.
    Right, but again, if you tried to gas the colony, the Aliens could just ... leave. Because they can clearly hold their breath a long time.

    Also, you're forgetting that gassing an Alien was tried -- successfully -- in the very first movie. Ripley uses insecticide to drive the Alien out of its hole in the Narcissus wall, and it's clearly bothered by it. Not killed, but bothered at least.

    Well true, depends on the actual situation. But still, i think effective chemical weapons are too much of an "I win" button.

    Wasn't it the temperature that startled the Alien? I thought it was either hot steam or some coolant not something toxic. But i may misremember the details.
  22. SiL
    Quote from: The Kurgan on Jan 21, 2019, 12:50:39 PM
    I don't think it's quite the same. I see no problem in guns beeing able the kill an alien, but if you could just gas or poison them big scale, that would significantly decrease their threat. At least for me.

    Have an infection? Just gas the colony with minimal structural damage, wait until it dispenses or neutralize it, and the whole thing is as good as new.
    Right, but again, if you tried to gas the colony, the Aliens could just ... leave. Because they can clearly hold their breath a long time.

    Also, you're forgetting that gassing an Alien was tried -- successfully -- in the very first movie. Ripley uses insecticide to drive the Alien out of its hole in the Narcissus wall, and it's clearly bothered by it. Not killed, but bothered at least. Meanwhile, the marines don't bother using nerve gas because they're not sure it would even affect them -- sure, they might breathe it in, but that doesn't mean the chemicals will react the same way with the Alien nervous system.

    So, again -- breathing really isn't the Achile's heel people think it is.
  23. The Kurgan
    Quote from: Xenomrph on Jan 20, 2019, 03:34:48 PM
    Quote from: The Kurgan on Jan 20, 2019, 02:10:23 PM
    Quote from: SiL on Jan 20, 2019, 11:03:50 AM
    There's really no reason to assume they don't breathe, or that it's some kind of weakness. Evidence pretty clearly points to the fact they breathe. But also that they are super good at holding their breath.

    It is a weakness. They can only operate for extended time in environments where they can breath, you could bring poison into their body over their respiratory system, you could suffocate them...

    I think it severely limits their adaptability, even if they could breath nearly anything.

    Maybe they breath in air to use some exotic sense? Like a snake "smelling" with its tounge.
    Maybe to gauge pheromone concentration in the air or something like that.
    Like I said a few posts up, I think it could be part of their sensory system, not necessarily a vital life support system. Echolocation, smell, etc.

    Oh sorry, totally missed that. Agreed.

    Quote from: SiL on Jan 20, 2019, 10:13:15 PM
    Quote from: The Kurgan on Jan 20, 2019, 02:10:23 PM
    It is a weakness. They can only operate for extended time in environments where they can breath, you could bring poison into their body over their respiratory system, you could suffocate them...
    That's like complaining their skin isn't bullet proof, though. If they can hold their breath for a long time then they could have a good chance of escaping poisons and gas. Again, the Queen lasted a good while in space.

    And for a species that's parasitic, being able to survive places potential hosts can't really isn't that advantageous.

    I don't think it's quite the same. I see no problem in guns beeing able the kill an alien, but if you could just gas or poison them big scale, that would significantly decrease their threat. At least for me.

    Have an infection? Just gas the colony with minimal structural damage, wait until it dispenses or neutralize it, and the whole thing is as good as new.

    Quote from: Corporal Hicks on Jan 21, 2019, 08:49:15 AM
    Am I the only one who thinks Gabriel would have done Earth War/Female War justice? There's something about his art in Dust to Dust that makes me imagine that series if it was actually good.

    For sure, his art would be a nice match.
  24. SiL
    Quote from: The Kurgan on Jan 20, 2019, 02:10:23 PM
    It is a weakness. They can only operate for extended time in environments where they can breath, you could bring poison into their body over their respiratory system, you could suffocate them...
    That's like complaining their skin isn't bullet proof, though. If they can hold their breath for a long time then they could have a good chance of escaping poisons and gas. Again, the Queen lasted a good while in space.

    And for a species that's parasitic, being able to survive places potential hosts can't really isn't that advantageous.
  25. Xenomrph
    Quote from: The Kurgan on Jan 20, 2019, 02:10:23 PM
    Quote from: SiL on Jan 20, 2019, 11:03:50 AM
    There's really no reason to assume they don't breathe, or that it's some kind of weakness. Evidence pretty clearly points to the fact they breathe. But also that they are super good at holding their breath.

    It is a weakness. They can only operate for extended time in environments where they can breath, you could bring poison into their body over their respiratory system, you could suffocate them...

    I think it severely limits their adaptability, even if they could breath nearly anything.

    Maybe they breath in air to use some exotic sense? Like a snake "smelling" with its tounge.
    Maybe to gauge pheromone concentration in the air or something like that.
    Like I said a few posts up, I think it could be part of their sensory system, not necessarily a vital life support system. Echolocation, smell, etc.
  26. The Kurgan
    Quote from: SiL on Jan 20, 2019, 11:03:50 AM
    There's really no reason to assume they don't breathe, or that it's some kind of weakness. Evidence pretty clearly points to the fact they breathe. But also that they are super good at holding their breath.

    It is a weakness. They can only operate for extended time in environments where they can breath, you could bring poison into their body over their respiratory system, you could suffocate them...

    I think it severely limits their adaptability, even if they could breath nearly anything.

    Maybe they breath in air to use some exotic sense? Like a snake "smelling" with its tounge.
    Maybe to gauge pheromone concentration in the air or something like that.
  27. TC
    Quote from: The Kurgan on Jan 20, 2019, 09:39:06 AM
    Quote from: The Cruentus on Jan 20, 2019, 09:34:39 AM
    They snarl, roar and hiss. That requires the ability to breath.

    Technically only the ability to push out air.

    Quote from: The Cruentus on Jan 20, 2019, 09:40:36 AM
    Which would require air to have been inhaled in the first place for it to be breathed out.

    What do you guys mean by "breathe?" Do you mean respiration? i.e. the absorption of oxygen into the bloodstream so that it can oxidize glucose into energy for cellular processes (and expel carbon dioxide waste).

    If the alien is a biomechanical being (although less and less so after Alien '79), or some kind of artificial creation, then I don't see why it's creators couldn't have used some kind of alien tech to "power" the xeno's cellular function. (Although surely Ash would have noted it during his examination of the face-hugger - but then again, maybe he did note it but was keeping a lot of secrets to himself.)

    So if the xeno's suck air in and out (which they clearly do), not for respiration purposes, then for what?

    I've always thought of the creatures as gene samplers. They prefer to prey on hosts that will boost their own evolution as predators. So maybe they suck in air to sample any DNA in the vicinity. Interestingly, humans do just this. In experiments where males and females are given sweaty tee shirts recently worn by the opposite sex and asked to rate the odours by "sexiness," the test subjects will prefer the sweat indicative of a different immunology than their own. This makes for a better mating prospect because any offspring will benefit from a more diversely reactive immune system (and therefore more able to combat a wider range of foreign micro-pathogens).

    TC
  28. SiL
    There's really no reason to assume they don't breathe, or that it's some kind of weakness. Evidence pretty clearly points to the fact they breathe. But also that they are super good at holding their breath.
  29. Xenomrph
    Quote from: The Kurgan on Jan 20, 2019, 09:46:53 AM
    Or it air or some equivalent gets produced by whatever functions that keep them going.

    Also if i recall correctly the only undoubtedly breathing aliens are the hybrids in Resurrection. Maybe those do breath as a byproduct of the human DNA in them.


    Alternately, the inhaling/exhaling isn't necessarily related to vital respiratory functions, but is instead part of an echolocation system that contributes to the Alien's already impressive sensory abilities.
  30. SiL
    Quote from: The Old One on Jan 20, 2019, 04:13:24 AM
    Actually, as far as I've read-
    A tardigrades survivability
    has nothing much to do
    with their size, amazing
    creatures. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tardigrade
    They are amazing creatures, but if you read about how they survive in space it doesn't say "indefinitely", and it points out they're not extremophiles because they can't thrive in those conditions, only endure. They tested tardigrades who were already in "survival mode", and those in a normal condition -- only 68% of the "survival mode" tardigrades could be revived, and subsequent mortality rates were high. The regular group fared worse.

    So they can endure it, but they'll still die in space faster than in ideal conditions.

    Quote from: The Cruentus on Jan 20, 2019, 09:47:54 AM
    The Queen is clearly heard breathing in aliens.
    And all the Aliens in Resurrection are breathing. I know the argument would be that "it's the genetic crossing", but since the regular Aliens Queen was also breathing, it's clearly not a contamination.

    Also the original Alien yawns, which is a product of a respiratory system.
  31. The Kurgan
    Or it air or some equivalent gets produced by whatever functions that keep them going.

    Also if i recall correctly the only undoubtedly breathing aliens are the hybrids in Resurrection. Maybe those do breath as a byproduct of the human DNA in them.

  32. The Kurgan
    Quote from: The Cruentus on Jan 20, 2019, 09:26:02 AM
    Quote from: The Kurgan on Jan 19, 2019, 02:58:47 PM
    Nah i don't think they breath.

    It would severely limit their ability to survive in different environments and it would be a pretty big weakness.

    They are also biomechanical creatures. Breathing just does not feel right for them.

    They do breathe, they would not be able to make hissing noises otherwise, and their breath can clearly be seen coming out of some of them in of the films.

    A steam boiler or steam engine hisses and you can see steam come out of them, does not mean they breath. Considering the biomechanical nature of the things, hissing and "breath" coming out of them, could be something entirely different than the organic equivalent.
  33. The Kurgan
    Quote from: Xenomrph on Jan 19, 2019, 11:47:03 PM

    Quote from: Still Collating... on Jan 19, 2019, 04:30:59 PM
    Quote from: SM on Jan 19, 2019, 08:13:44 AM
    QuoteAnd it irked me that they made such a big deal of the aliens exploding because of explosives they had on them when don't aliens do that regularly when shot and sliced?

    No.

    Maybe they don't explode Hollywood/A:CM boiler style but they clearly have either a high blood pressure or the weapons that kill them spread the blood everywhere. Maybe explode was a bit too much, but they do squirt a lot.  :laugh: Smartgun, the pulse rifle makes a good splash, Rez when the alien was shot on the ladder had its head explode, in A3 after the molten lead and cold water crack its head: boom.
    It's the one I bolded. The pulse rifle and smartgun fire explosive-tipped ammunition, I can't really speak to the one in Resurrection because who knows what kind of rounds Johner's pistols were firing, and the one in A3 exploding is due to the extreme temperature change - similar things happen with terrestrial objects.

    At least the facehugger seemed to have a highly pressurized bloodstream when they attempted to cut him down from Kane's face.

  34. SiL
    Quote from: The Old One on Jan 19, 2019, 02:20:14 PM
    The microscopic tardigrade- has been evaluated to have the ability survive in the vaccum of space for at least ten days.

    So there's no reason, the Alien couldn't.
    That's a very poor argument. "Microscopic" is the key word there. Microscopic life is capable of many things macroscopic life isn't -- and vice versa.

    The Queen, however, is a good enough argument that they can survive much, much longer than a human exposed to a vacuum. Whether they can survive "indefinitely" is another story. They clearly breathe. But she lasted the better part of an hour with no ill effect, so clearly it doesn't bother them as much.
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