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Meet Walter – New Alien: Covenant Viral Video

The Alien: Covenant social media channels have shared a new viral video for Alien: Covenant. Entitled Meet Walter, the short 12 second video poses a question straight from the pages of Frankenstein – “How dangerous is the acquirement of knowledge?

The mention of the 10th of March is likely in reference to SXSW where Sir Ridley Scott, Michael Fassbender and Danny McBride will be attending a special screening of Alien and giving the audience a sneak peak at Alien: Covenant. It now seems likely that international audiences will get a chance to see the footage too!

Keep a close eye on Alien vs. Predator Galaxy for the latest on Alien: Covenant! You can follow us on FacebookTwitter and Instagram to get the latest on your social media walls. You can also join in with fellow Alien fans on our forums!



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Comments: 28
  1. NickisSmart
    Yeah, Frankenstein is a very deep, erudite work. It is a Gothic horror story, too, told in a framed narrative, etc, etc. But it is a work of much thought, ruminating on the nature of man.
  2. Enoch
    Spoiler
    Maybe there is a scene where David opens Walters scull to transfer his
    memory into his AMD powered system :laugh: Or maybe Walter is the evil guy... I more and more think
    that there is something far more sinister behind his character.
    [close]


    Maybe this will show how deep and profound Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley's work is:

    QuoteFrankenstein points the Faustian moral to Walton: "Learn from me, if not by my precepts, at least by my example, how dangerous is the acquirement of knowledge, and how much happier that man is who believes his native town to be the world, than he who aspires to become greater than his nature will allow" (p. 53). But this moral— particularly appropriate to the realistic novel— is argued very ambivalently. Even the monster repeats the argument (as he must, being Frankenstein's alter ego): "Increase of knowledge only discovered to me more clearly what a wretched outcast I was" (p. 131). As his knowledge grows, he cries out: "Oh, that I had for ever remained in my native wood, nor known nor felt beyond the sensation of hunger, thirst, and heat!" (p. 120). Yet Mary Shelley knows, as the monster learned, that there is no returning to innocence; the rhetoric implies that the innocence is a lie,  and that the disaster that follows its loss is as inevitable as the loss itself. "Of what a strange nature is knowledge! It clings to the mind, when it has once seized on it, like a lichen on the rock. I wished sometimes to shake off all thought and feeling; but I learned that there was but one means to overcome the sensation of pain, and that was death" (p. 120). The monster knows that only silence ends the disparity between word and life. Frankenstein, however, cannot give up the quest or insist unambiguously on the moral of his story. His last speech is a masterpiece of doubt: "Farewell, Walton!" he says. "Seek happiness in tranquillity, and avoid ambition, even if it be only the apparently innocent one of distinguishing yourself in science and discoveries. Yet why do I say this? I have myself been blasted in these hopes, yet another may succeed" (pp. 217-18). Death is the only resolution, and yet it resolves nothing since knowledge and innocence are continuing aspects of human experience. The tension worked out in Frankenstein between ambition and natural harmony, as between creator and creature, mind and reality, is not resolved.

    I see how she influenced Joseph Conrad...
  3. Enoch
    Lawrence reference is cool, but original Frankenstein novel is great too...
    Not just a monster story but great philosophical work. Alien movies have a great potential
    just because they can mix all this horror-sf-mystery stories into one huge epic...
  4. Ingwar
    Quote from: Enoch on Mar 08, 2017, 07:08:21 PM

    Quote"'Learn from me, if not by my precepts, at least by my example, how dangerous is the acquirement of knowledge and how much happier that man is who believes his native town to be the world, than he who aspires to become greater than his nature will allow,'"  chapter 4 of Frankenstein by Mary Shelley; originally titled The Modern Prometheus

    Nice one Enoch!
  5. Enoch
    I said Ridley will reference Frankenstein again...

    Explanation of Victor's / Walters quote or perhaps Davids' :laugh:

    QuoteVictor has tried to play God, has tried -- in fact -- to be like the Titan Prometheus, who stepped in to help his brother Epimetheus create humankind when Epimetheus mistakenly made all of the animals first, giving them all the "good" qualities (i.e. thick hide or fur to protect them, sharp teeth and claws to help them to eat, etc.).  Prometheus had to get creative to come up with qualities that would help us to be the best: he made us walk upright like the gods, and he gave us the fire that would help defend us from the cold and help us to cook the meat that our teeth could not otherwise chew.  Victor has tried to create a new human species, a species that he expected would "bless him as its Creator."  He wanted to perfect something that he saw as imperfect -- human frailty and fragility -- but he learned, too late, that human beings are not meant to create in this way: his creation turns out to be horrifying, perhaps in part because it was made by an imperfect (i.e. human) creator.  Thus, when Victor describes the dangers of striving to be "'greater than [one's] nature will allow,'" he also refers to the dangers of a human being who tries to play God. Victor's hubris results in tragedy for so many people, including himself and the individual he creates.

    I think Ridley will again continue to play with this...
    There is a certain possibility that many aspects of SCIFIED article could be correct.
  6. Enoch
    Quote from: Ingwar on Mar 08, 2017, 07:06:53 PM
    Walter is American. David is British.

    Thats because they wanted to create distinction between the two. Weyland-Yutani
    probably have the largest cybernetic factory on American soil... :D

    Quote"'Learn from me, if not by my precepts, at least by my example, how dangerous is the acquirement of knowledge and how much happier that man is who believes his native town to be the world, than he who aspires to become greater than his nature will allow,'"  chapter 4 of Frankenstein by Mary Shelley; originally titled The Modern Prometheus
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