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Jon Spaihts Talks Prometheus

In a lengthy interview with Forbes.com, Jon Spaihts talks about how he got involved with the film, Ridley Scott and some of the main ideas and inspirations for the story. It’s very interesting read. Visit the source or click below to read the interview in full.

“He [Ridley Scott] thinks on multiple story levels all the time, his pen is always moving, always sketching images with a phenomenal draftsmen’s eye.” Scott would see an image in his mind, and Spaihts’ job was often to make it happen in the story. “Sometimes my job was to push back. ‘No, someone can’t float around in the scene, we have gravity here.’”

Thanks to seeasea for the link.



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Comments: 13
  1. Qwertify
    Nope. 90% of lost made sense.

    I agree that 90% made sense. It is just that a majority of that remaining 10% made up the ending. Without a real sense of closure and without a real resolution to everything that has happened before it, "Lost" could be said to only be self-gratifying. It is a derived pleasure with no real purpose. "Lost" is a journey that begins as abruptly as it ends, and a side-effect of that being left with no bearing as to what all the action in the middle was supposed to mean. It sates your enigma tooth but you're not really left with anything substantial. You cannot really connect Lost in any large and meaningful way to reality. If you think you can, then we disagree.

    In that sense I, and I think many other people, want Prometheus to be more than just a big "Lost" episode, because although it would still be a lot of fun - we were promised that the movie would deal with grand ideas that walk around the truth of what there may actually be out there. That is not to say that the mystery part of "Lost" and a concrete conclusion are mutually exclusive. Scott himself said there will be more questions than answers in the end. So either way we will come back here and dissect it, but ending should take a clear stand as to what it all could mean, and not just throw us another mystery because they themselves have had no real answer all this time.
  2. zuzuki
    Funny. Spaihts has his name attached to one known film so far (The Darkest Hour 'which was horrible) and he gets a pass. Lindelof is attached to actual successful film[television] and he's hated. LOL..people are funny. :)

    "Lost" gyrated around senselessly with one mystery constantly unfolding into a greater one with an ending that made no sense. People were afraid that this might also hold true for Prometheus - that it would grab your attention with interesting mysteries, but fail to deliver in the end. In the end he would just hand you another cliffhanger or expose another layer of the world but offer you no resolution and then just kind of shrug his shoulders and say he doesn't really know what it all means.

    No one knows Spaiths, but he is our hope that Prometheus will not end up like "Lost." That is the only reason. Scott on the other hand must have let him write the script after being impressed and convinced that he is capable enough to pull it off.

    Nope. 90% of lost made sense.

    Quote
    with one mystery constantly unfolding into a greater one

    That was actually one of the shows charms. I loved that shit, the constant teasing and twists. And i do hope prometheus will end up like lost. extremely moody and full with wtf moments that will get us back here after the movie and disect every aspect of it
  3. Qwertify
    Funny. Spaihts has his name attached to one known film so far (The Darkest Hour 'which was horrible) and he gets a pass. Lindelof is attached to actual successful film[television] and he's hated. LOL..people are funny. :)

    "Lost" gyrated around senselessly with one mystery constantly unfolding into a greater one with an ending that made no sense. People were afraid that this might also hold true for Prometheus - that it would grab your attention with interesting mysteries, but fail to deliver in the end. In the end he would just hand you another cliffhanger or expose another layer of the world but offer you no resolution and then just kind of shrug his shoulders and say he doesn't really know what it all means.

    No one knows Spaiths, but he is our hope that Prometheus will not end up like "Lost." That is the only reason. Scott on the other hand must have let him write the script after being impressed and convinced that he is capable enough to pull it off.
  4. ThisBethesdaSea
    Funny. Spaihts has his name attached to one known film so far (The Darkest Hour 'which was horrible) and he gets a pass. Lindelof is attached to actual successful film[television] and he's hated. LOL..people are funny. :)

  5. Skylark Duquesne
    What an amazing position to find yourself in. I would give anything to have been in his shoes during that process.

    That's for sure Chris. I guess anybody would. But just how a young author with so few credentials could catch the big man's attention... Beats me. He must have pitched mighty concepts to secure a job with Scott. A collaboration with Greg Benford or Joe Haldeman would have seemed more in keeping with the importance of the event, and Scott's professed ambitions.
    Fortunately, the wait won't be long now and when the veil of mystery and secrecy finally parts, there'd better be surprises, twists, grand revelations and shocking scenes galore. I trust there will be, though a line such as "If you don't stop it, there won't be any home to go back to !" doesn't strike me as being particularly original, races against time to save the world have been done before...
    I guess Sir Ridley would counter by saying that it's all a amatter of angle.
  6. Qwertify
    “if that story is somehow ours, and deeply enmeshed with the human story. That story changes meaning within our own life, things of such significance that we think of our own lives differently… and our future. The great task was figuring out how to connect these alien tales to our story past and future.”
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