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Author Topic: Does anybody actually like the Oram/David/Xeno get...  (Read 3374 times)


JokersWarPig
Oct 31, 2017, 12:44:24 PM
Reply #16 on: Oct 31, 2017, 12:44:24 PM
Q
I loathe it.
I'm not going to hate on anyone who likes it, I just don't understand why they like it.




TWJones
Oct 31, 2017, 01:25:26 PM
Reply #19 on: Oct 31, 2017, 01:25:26 PM
Q
I really liked the scene the first time I watched it. I thought that David was watching very carefully to see how the creature reacted once it was born, if David's genetic manipulations in the lab had worked.

We know that some creatures imprint on the first person/animal they see after they're born. So this creature seeing David as a parent and mimicking him was interesting, I thought. And it shows that this act of creation is the only thing giving David any meaning in his existence. We also see that briefly when Oram kills the neomorph. David is absolutely gutted over it.


Paranoid Android
Oct 31, 2017, 02:00:48 PM
Reply #20 on: Oct 31, 2017, 02:00:48 PM
Q
it shows that this act of creation is the only thing giving David any meaning in his existence. We also see that briefly when Oram kills the neomorph. David is absolutely gutted over it.
Only to later show absolutely no emotion towards the death of the thing he created...twice.

« Last Edit: Oct 31, 2017, 02:02:36 PM by Paranoid Android »

TWJones
Oct 31, 2017, 02:16:44 PM
Reply #21 on: Oct 31, 2017, 02:16:44 PM
Q
it shows that this act of creation is the only thing giving David any meaning in his existence. We also see that briefly when Oram kills the neomorph. David is absolutely gutted over it.
Only to later show absolutely no emotion towards the death of the thing he created...twice.

I took his reaction over the neopmorph's death to be more about the progress he felt he was making in connecting with it...not its death necessarily. Sort of like having a computer shut down randomly when you're in the middle of writing something. It's the loss of progress, not death, that made him so angry.

At least that's how I took it. And if he perfected the xeno, it was built to kill and be killed. It was serving its purpose, which is why David wasn't upset over those deaths. He knew he could make thousands more.



tleilaxu
Oct 31, 2017, 03:27:28 PM
Reply #23 on: Oct 31, 2017, 03:27:28 PM
Q
Amazing scene. Emphasizes what Alien is all about: creation, birth, desire for biological perfection etc. I guess the scene didn't have enough guns, explosions and yelling marines to please Aliens fans though.


Rudiger
Oct 31, 2017, 03:29:56 PM
Reply #24 on: Oct 31, 2017, 03:29:56 PM
Q
I took his reaction over the neopmorph's death to be more about the progress he felt he was making in connecting with it...not its death necessarily. Sort of like having a computer shut down randomly when you're in the middle of writing something. It's the loss of progress, not death, that made him so angry.

At least that's how I took it. And if he perfected the xeno, it was built to kill and be killed. It was serving its purpose, which is why David wasn't upset over those deaths. He knew he could make thousands more.

That doesn't really make any sense. But then none of it really does. Why be bothered by the loss of the neomorph, which is basically a by-product, and show no concern over the loss of his master creation (twice, as highlighted above)? Why did David let Oram just brush him to one side, when he has vastly superior strength and reflexes? Why blow on the neomorph's nose in the first place? It's not a horse. That makes as much sense as blowing on the nose of a lion. How might that work out I wonder? Why did Oram suddenly then become so monumentally dumb as to follow David anywhere? I don't think these are the questions Ridley Scott meant for me to be thinking about.


TWJones
Oct 31, 2017, 05:39:59 PM
Reply #25 on: Oct 31, 2017, 05:39:59 PM
Q
I took his reaction over the neopmorph's death to be more about the progress he felt he was making in connecting with it...not its death necessarily. Sort of like having a computer shut down randomly when you're in the middle of writing something. It's the loss of progress, not death, that made him so angry.

At least that's how I took it. And if he perfected the xeno, it was built to kill and be killed. It was serving its purpose, which is why David wasn't upset over those deaths. He knew he could make thousands more.

That doesn't really make any sense. But then none of it really does. Why be bothered by the loss of the neomorph, which is basically a by-product, and show no concern over the loss of his master creation (twice, as highlighted above)? Why did David let Oram just brush him to one side, when he has vastly superior strength and reflexes? Why blow on the neomorph's nose in the first place? It's not a horse. That makes as much sense as blowing on the nose of a lion. How might that work out I wonder? Why did Oram suddenly then become so monumentally dumb as to follow David anywhere? I don't think these are the questions Ridley Scott meant for me to be thinking about.

I took David letting himself be brushed aside not wanting to show his hand quite yet. And why wouldn't Oram follow him? As far as he knew David was still behaving rationally, and if there were any suspicions, certainly Oram wanted to know what they were up against. He had the gun and David had not attacked him.

Blowing on it...it was experimentation. David using the knowledge he had and seeing if it had any effect on the Neo, which it did. I see David as willing to try anything to learn about the creatures.

But...you didn't like it. Fair enough. It made sense to me at the time as I was carried along with the story. Sometimes I get swept up in what's happening and I don't really question anything as it moves forward. I'll analyze and pick it apart afterward, but in the moment I just like to experience it.


Jonesy1974
Oct 31, 2017, 06:43:37 PM
Reply #26 on: Oct 31, 2017, 06:43:37 PM
Q
I pretty much thought the same thing as you on all those moments in the film.


Baron Von Marlon
Oct 31, 2017, 07:44:13 PM
Reply #27 on: Oct 31, 2017, 07:44:13 PM
Q
I thought it was quite alright.
Loved David's expression during the chestburst scene.
Bit like a biologist discovering a new species and a proud parent.


BigDaddyJohn
Nov 03, 2017, 02:18:07 PM
Reply #28 on: Nov 03, 2017, 02:18:07 PM
Q
Liked the music mostly, felt some "emotion" due to that, nonetheless it was an over the top scene.


David Weyland
Nov 03, 2017, 03:37:07 PM
Reply #29 on: Nov 03, 2017, 03:37:07 PM
Q
Best song on the soundtrack ‘Chestbuster’ along with the opening credit score


 

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