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Author Topic: Idea on How Aliens wall crawl.  (Read 3903 times)

X-SOLDIER
Feb 09, 2010, 05:37:08 PM
Topic on: Feb 09, 2010, 05:37:08 PM
Q
From the films, the Xenomorphs are always dripping some sort of fluid, and aside from making them creepy, and possibly solidifying into resin (from the way that it seems to stick to guns on the floor in a more congealed way than when it's dripping off their jaws), I was wondering if it served another purpose. If it solidifies into resin at some point, I was wondering if it would allow them to more easily cling to surfaces like ceilings, walls, etc.

Then I saw this article on Engadget the other day that got me thinking (video in the link).

Quote from: Engadget
Climbing walls is one of those odd feats that scientific establishments seem compelled to master -- despite there being few practical applications beyond the ultimate in Marvel-themed Halloween attire. The latest to tackle the challenge are Paul Steen and Michael Vogel from Cornell University, who have stolen the sticky-feet technique of a Floridian beetle that apparently failed to file a patent. The technique relies on the surface tension of water and capillary action of fluids forced through thousands of microscopic holes. When moisture is pushed through the holes it creates a suction on a smooth surface, enough at this point for the team's prototype to hold a weight of 30 grams. When the water is retracted the suction disappears. If all goes well, future implementations of a similar size could hold 15 pounds, meaning with enough of them you could climb a wall -- without leaving a sticky mess behind.

I think that this is a rather interesting idea for how Aliens could wall crawl that would also explain the need for their bodies to use / exude a fluid. I'm not sure if it would function in space, but if there's some chemical reaction that allows them to speed the process at which the fluid turns into resin, they may be able to make it a stronger adhesive for higher gravity / zero gravity. Anyhows, just theory crafting, but I thought some of you might find it interesting.


X 8)


FearPeteySodes
Feb 09, 2010, 05:39:13 PM
Reply #1 on: Feb 09, 2010, 05:39:13 PM
Q
That is a pretty cool theory.  And here i was thinking alien goo was just to scare the shit out of marines and glue weapons to the floor.


keylight-di
Feb 09, 2010, 05:55:43 PM
Reply #2 on: Feb 09, 2010, 05:55:43 PM
Q
@X-SOLDIER:

I find it very interesting.

While biology and biochemistry Xenos is certainly very different from what we know, the laws of physics govern the entire universe as well. Without exception.
Clinging  to surfaces and wall--crawling it's the most characteristic for them and  easiest to explain, using knowing physical knowledge.
Very interesting idea, thank you.  :)


Xenomrph
Feb 09, 2010, 07:08:21 PM
Reply #3 on: Feb 09, 2010, 07:08:21 PM
Q
That idea is pretty much exactly what is used to explain the wall-crawling in the old Leading Edge "Aliens" RPG. Aliens secrete a sort of "contact cement" from their hands and feet that allows them to stick to surfaces, but they're able to stick to their own hive resin the best.


X-SOLDIER
Feb 09, 2010, 09:17:23 PM
Reply #4 on: Feb 09, 2010, 09:17:23 PM
Q
@X-SOLDIER:

I find it very interesting.

While biology and biochemistry Xenos is certainly very different from what we know, the laws of physics govern the entire universe as well. Without exception.
Clinging  to surfaces and wall--crawling it's the most characteristic for them and  easiest to explain, using knowing physical knowledge.
Very interesting idea, thank you.  :)

While there's plenty of ways to explain wall crawling as it's not really something that's too spectacular in terms of physical talents, as there's creatures like Geckos that perform this feat all the time with their natural abilities, it was the use of capilary action & fluids that interested me, in that it might give an additional reason for the Xenomorphs to constantly be producing a fluid (aside from the possible creation of Hive resin).

That idea is pretty much exactly what is used to explain the wall-crawling in the old Leading Edge "Aliens" RPG. Aliens secrete a sort of "contact cement" from their hands and feet that allows them to stick to surfaces, but they're able to stick to their own hive resin the best.

This is interesting. I hadn't seen this before, so thanks a lot for the post. It's cool knowing that there's some other sources that support a similiar type of movement.


X 8)


keylight-di
Feb 10, 2010, 12:11:28 PM
Reply #5 on: Feb 10, 2010, 12:11:28 PM
Q
@X-SOLDIER:

I find it very interesting.

While biology and biochemistry Xenos is certainly very different from what we know, the laws of physics govern the entire universe as well. Without exception.
Clinging  to surfaces and wall--crawling it's the most characteristic for them and  easiest to explain, using knowing physical knowledge.
Very interesting idea, thank you.  :)

While there's plenty of ways to explain wall crawling as it's not really something that's too spectacular in terms of physical talents, as there's creatures like Geckos that perform this feat all the time with their natural abilities, it was the use of capilary action & fluids that interested me, in that it might give an additional reason for the Xenomorphs to constantly be producing a fluid (aside from the possible creation of Hive resin).
some other sources that support a similiar type of movement.

Everything is correct. But the principle of movement on the vertical surfaces of animals like geckos, is completely different. Geckos have antlias (sucking disks) at the ends of their fingers. It is no philosophy to climb, with such adaptation. This same about flies. Xenos hands and feet are built quite differently. This article concludes that the movement of the Xenos on vertical surfaces is closer to the principle of snails than geckos.  ;)
Besides - I think - here is the major influence of relation: mass-to-surface of adhesion. All animals we know have a low weight and large surface adhesion to the surface. It is difficult to evaluate the importance of body Xeno, but it certainly differs from the weight of an average reptile.


SM
Feb 10, 2010, 11:08:45 PM
Reply #6 on: Feb 10, 2010, 11:08:45 PM
Q
I like the idea better that they just scoff at gravity when it suits.


Kriszilla
Feb 10, 2010, 11:50:05 PM
Reply #7 on: Feb 10, 2010, 11:50:05 PM
Q
Gravity is too scared to tell the aliens what to do.



Hive Tyrant
Feb 11, 2010, 01:18:49 PM
Reply #9 on: Feb 11, 2010, 01:18:49 PM
Q
They're just absolutely uber-strong. They press their fingers harder into the surface than gravity pulls them down.


FearPeteySodes
Feb 11, 2010, 03:45:38 PM
Reply #10 on: Feb 11, 2010, 03:45:38 PM
Q
I like the idea better that they just scoff at gravity when it suits.

In all seriousness i do like that idea.  I can't remember who said it (director commentary, Cameron maybe on the alien wall to wall jumps) but they purposefully bended the laws of physics to really give a sense of horror that we understand nothing about these creatures.

I would agree.



FearPeteySodes
Feb 11, 2010, 04:10:14 PM
Reply #12 on: Feb 11, 2010, 04:10:14 PM
Q
but they purposefully bended the laws of physics to really give a sense of horror

Somehow the image of xenomorphs lazily hovering around with their arms, legs and tail drooping doesn't evoke any horror in me whatsoever.

I guess it's a good thing that that's not in the films nor what i was referring to then eh?


peanut8
Feb 11, 2010, 04:13:18 PM
Reply #13 on: Feb 11, 2010, 04:13:18 PM
Q
If your statement that
Quote
they purposefully bended the laws of physics
is correct, then that's pretty much what Kane's Son does before and after he kills Brett.


Galli
Feb 12, 2010, 12:15:55 AM
Reply #14 on: Feb 12, 2010, 12:15:55 AM
Q
I always thought the huge head had something to do with it. Aside from housing the "pheromone sensors", maybe something inside that head creates an artificial gravity well that makes the xenomorphs appear to stick to surfaces.

Or, maybe it's the tubes? They have no visible purpose. Maybe they generate artificial gravity?


 

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