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“I Think The Beast Has Almost Run Out, Personally” – Ridley Scott on the Alien

If you’re having flashbacks to the earlier years of the 2010s, you can be forgiven. Sir Ridley Scott had spoken numerous times over recent years about how he thought the Alien was no longer effective, so much so that it came as quite a surprise when Prometheus 2 was announced as Alien: Paradise Lost (later Alien: Covenant)!

It seems that despite his inclusion of the Alien in Covenant, Ridley Scott still has a negative opinion on future uses of the Alien! During a roundtable hosted by The Hollywood Reporter, when asked by the host about why he choose to direct Alien: Covenant over Blade Runner 2049, Ridley made the comment about his current thoughts on the creature:

“It was a crossfire of too much business. I’m doing a lot of TV and a lot of films – there’s 6 films going out this year – and one of them…I figured it was a good piece of business to follow through on Prometheus, which from ground zero had good liftoff, so we went to Covenant to perpetuate the idea and re-evolve the universe of the Alien.

But I think the beast has almost run out, personally. You’ve got to come in with something else. You’ve got to replace that. And so I was right…I was ahead of the game. I had to make a decision and Deni was a terrific choice.”

So it would appear that Sir Ridley Scott is still not as interested in the Alien. And, from some behind-the-scenes chatter that Alien vs. Predator Galaxy has heard it would seem that the decision to include the Aliens in Prometheus 2 came down from the studio. Will Fox and Scott continue in the direction of the Alien for the next film or will they steer back away from it?

Thanks to Ingwar for the link. Keep a close eye on Alien vs. Predator Galaxy for the latest on Alien: Covenant and Alien: Covenant 2! You can follow us on FacebookTwitter and Instagram to get the latest on your social media walls. You can also join in with fellow Alien fans on our forums!



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Comments: 361
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  1. bb-15
    Covenant featured the best alien-bursting-from-a-human-body scene since 1979. It's no longer scary (and more importantly disturbing) because we've seen it before. The same with aliens stalking people in dark corridors and shafts or swarming a barricaded compartment. It's all familiar. You know how it will play out.
    I don't think there' anyone against good characters, but keep in mind that in Alien the characters are archetypes. It's not like the chestburster scene succeeded because Kane was such a compelling character.

    This is close to where I'm at.
    I thought the Neomorph back burster sequence was one of the best science fiction horror moments in the entire Alien franchise.
    - But because the Giger inspired monsters have been played out and the style of Alien has been copied (see "Life", etc.); the question comes, where to go from there with the story?
    - A few jump scares? It's still not enough.

    * What Ridley decided with "Prometheus" was to go in a more detailed, serious science fiction direction. The film made decent money.
    But because the fan base is so split, a lot of fans hated "Prometheus".
    I definitely get that with all my IMDb "Prometheus" debates.
    But in the end I think for the future of the Alien franchise, Scott was on the right track.

    Personally, I'm interested in seeing a movie about the response of the Engineers to David's attack.

    ;)
  2. skhellter
    When Ripley goes to save Newt, there were few Aliens
    in the Hive because the rest were too busy gangbanging Hudson.  ;D
    #EDGY

    (Ridley will make this Canon, somehow.)


    there's probably a fanfic like this somewhere..
  3. Scorpio
    Ridley is saving the grand entrance of the Gigermorph for the last one.  The one in Covenant is a protomorph, and is meant to be more like a beast to contrast with the 'perfect organism'.
  4. SuicideDoors
    Everyone knows what a shark is and what it does. Jaws was still terrifying. It stopped being scary when the sequels got dumb and the craftsmanship in the filmmaking disappeared completely.

    The wheel doesn't need to be reinvented, someone just has to treat the creature with the same tact and care it was given at the start. That's where things go to shit: the filmmakers stop caring about the presentation and start thinking more about cool set pieces they can try out.

    Yup, this.

    And ultimately Alien still works. Bolaji Badejo lurking around the corridors of the Nostromo in that gorgeous Giger suit is still ominous and still immersive to watch as a viewer. One of the assets the Alien design still has going for it is you just can't take your eyes off it; has the grace of a butterfly yet the spine-tingling stay-the-f**k-away-from-me reaction you get,say, from a tarantula. 

    So I don't think the shape or presence of the creature is worn out, but as a lot of people in here are rightly saying, it just ain't being used right.
  5. Crazy Shrimp
    Covenant featured the best alien-bursting-from-a-human-body scene since 1979. It's no longer scary (and more importantly disturbing) because we've seen it before. The same with aliens stalking people in dark corridors and shafts or swarming a barricaded compartment. It's all familiar. You know how it will play out.
    I don't think there' anyone against good characters, but keep in mind that in Alien the characters are archetypes. It's not like the chestburster scene succeeded because Kane was such a compelling character.
    That's right. Why the f**k would I want to see the same f**king thing and the same predictable ending all over again? The "decent character" protagonists make it through hell and back -> oh no the Alien is still here  -> enter boss fight -> Alien is killed and humanity is saved.

    Covenant finally offered something different from this stale ending. The Xeno, through David, actually WON in Covenant. I'm eternally grateful for that.

    Yeah, and if the last sequel is still possible, Ridley Scott needs to finish his story with a dark conclusion. 
  6. Baron Von Marlon
    Covenant featured the best alien-bursting-from-a-human-body scene since 1979. It's no longer scary (and more importantly disturbing) because we've seen it before. The same with aliens stalking people in dark corridors and shafts or swarming a barricaded compartment. It's all familiar. You know how it will play out.
    I don't think there' anyone against good characters, but keep in mind that in Alien the characters are archetypes. It's not like the chestburster scene succeeded because Kane was such a compelling character.
    That's right. Why the f**k would I want to see the same f**king thing and the same predictable ending all over again? The "decent character" protagonists make it through hell and back -> oh no the Alien is still here  -> enter boss fight -> Alien is killed and humanity is saved.

    Covenant finally offered something different from this stale ending. The Xeno, through David, actually WON in Covenant. I'm eternally grateful for that.

    +1
  7. monkeylove
    As I explained in other threads, the dominant genre or probably theme employed by the first movie is horror. That's because the creature is fully revealed only in the last few scenes of the film.

    Obviously, they could no longer do that for the second movie, which is why action was employed.

    Another genre resembling detective fiction was used for the third, i.e., how to kill the creature.

    The fourth follows something similar in conspiracy films, involving scientists, the military, mercenaries, etc. Although the third looked like the proper end for the franchise, i.e., if Ripley is considered the center of the story, it is still open-ended because it is implied that the company or at least other groups would try to profit from the creatures. Which is what happened in the fourth.

    But the fourth still has no closure given the point that Ripley's character is brought back and the aliens still pose a thread to humans. Given that, the only genre I can imagine that is different from those used in previous films and that will finally give closure is major conflict and whatever tech needed to destroy the xenomorphs, or at least give human beings a fighting chance to do so but at incredible costs, thus allowing for a return to the bleakness of the first film.

    With that, it's obvious that the prequels would employ other genres, and in this case looks like something involving scientific discoveries concerning the origins of the creature and various plot twists connected to that. The idea is sound, but there were problems with the story, notably the introduction of a star map discovered and connecting it to "Engineers." Perhaps a more elaborate tale should have been constructed, and that would certainly make at least the first film look like 2001 rather than an Alien film. If similar principles were applied to the next movie, then it would have been different from the recent mess, where the same theme involving origins was mixed with elements from Alien and Aliens.

  8. Johnny Handsome
    Quote
    Scott: I think the Beast is almost run out
    Then just step the hell back and let someone who still has a passion for this franchise and creature, direct a movie fans really want to see and deserve. Then maybe people don't have to go through philosophical bullshit and Alien-Puking androids with a Wagner-fetish. This is some high quality Strause-Level bullshit.

    How can facehuggers, chestbursters, and xenos be scary again after we already know how each one of these kill people?
    It's all about the portrayal. I think there can absolutely be another scary Alien movie. People who hate spiders don't stop being afraid just because they have seen a spider before or know what they can or can't do. Ask my wife.

    Alien Covenant wasn't scary because Scott, in my book, didn't approach the creature right. Instead of making it slow, spooky and almost majestic in movement, playing with shadows and sounds, he turned the Alien in yet another hyperspastic CGI-beast, like we see in 90% of monster movies now.

    The beast is what you make of it and shouldn't be the only excuse for a shitty movie and/or box-office failure.
  9. SM
    Quote
    Aside from Isolation, when was the last time they were even attempted to be scary from the point of view of the story?

    They always attempt to be scary.
  10. tleilaxu
    Because you form an emotional attachment and feel bad when they're killed, or abducted like Newt was in Aliens, but then later when she's saved and all the bad monsters are dead you feel happy because the "decent characters" are alive and well. Then as the movie ends you sit up and clap until your hands are sore.
    Or some bullshit like that.

    Good to see that your dislike of Aliens doesn't get in the way of at least understanding why the film is so effective.
    I don't dislike the movie, I quite like it, but there are things in it that annoy me. Also, Titanic was also an "effective" film. Doesn't make it less dreadful to watch.

    Covenant featured the best alien-bursting-from-a-human-body scene since 1979. It's no longer scary (and more importantly disturbing) because we've seen it before. The same with aliens stalking people in dark corridors and shafts or swarming a barricaded compartment. It's all familiar. You know how it will play out.
    I don't think there' anyone against good characters, but keep in mind that in Alien the characters are archetypes. It's not like the chestburster scene succeeded because Kane was such a compelling character.
    That's right. Why the f**k would I want to see the same f**king thing and the same predictable ending all over again? The "decent character" protagonists make it through hell and back -> oh no the Alien is still here  -> enter boss fight -> Alien is killed and humanity is saved.

    Covenant finally offered something different from this stale ending. The Xeno, through David, actually WON in Covenant. I'm eternally grateful for that.
  11. TheBATMAN
    Aside from Isolation, when was the last time they were even attempted to be scary from the point of view of the story?

    Resurrection had them locked up and experimented on, meaning the creature was given a lot of exposure whilst locked in a cage.

    AVP decided the best way to portray the Alien and the Predator was have them wrestle around the floor like two drunken yobs who had just been thrown out of a pub.

    In Requiem they were just cannon fodder in an attempt to make Wolf look cool.

    And Covenant we have a director who didn't want the Alien in the film at all, so what chance did it have?

    The creature can easily be redeemed if put in the hands of a competent director who actually understands what made it great in the first place.

    The problem with Alien is that you get so many copycats trying to emulate its success and many get the basics right but they lack such an ingeniously designed creature. Alien on the other hand already has an iconic monster but instead of treating this as a blessing it seems to be a weight that drowns the franchise and encourage filmmakers to decide they need to do something drastically different from the norm.
  12. Jonesy1974
    I get what you're saying and agree to an extent but giving the audience too much information isn't the only problem. Familiarity and the use of a movie monster also lessons the impact. The Alien has been so over exposed and often misused that its lost its power to generate fear in audiences. This problem set in long before the prequels.

    Its possible to make a scary Alien movie again but its a huge ask and the fear has to come from something fresh because the egg - facehugger -
     Alien isn't going to cut it anymore.
    I definitely agree that focusing on the lifecycle itself isn't going to cut it. Focusing on it was scary when it was new. Now that it's established, the horror should focus simply on the threat behind it. This is something Alien:Isolation got and one of the reasons it worked so well: They didn't waste your time following the alien's lifecycle; You arrive to Sevastopol, and it's already there and fully grown. Now that you're stuck with this monster - what do you do?

    Quote
    I'm more than happy with Covenant but if you want an Alien movie which has broader appeal then I don't think tying to go the horror route will work. It needs to go down the action route for me and I don't have a problem with that providing its not the Blomkamp route of writing off 3 and creating Aliens 2.0 or the silliness of resurrection/AvP.
    I definitely prefer the horror route, but I agree that as an action film it has more of a mass appeal potential, and I'm fine either way. I don't really care what genre the film will be, as long as they don't misuse the alien in it.

    This is the key point that makes Isolation work. Its very different when the question is what do the characters I'm watching on screen do because the answer will always be pretty much the same things iv'e seen before.

    Everyone knows what a shark is and what it does. Jaws was still terrifying. It stopped being scary when the sequels got dumb and the craftsmanship in the filmmaking disappeared completely.

    The wheel doesn't need to be reinvented, someone just has to treat the creature with the same tact and care it was given at the start. That's where things go to shit: the filmmakers stop caring about the presentation and start thinking more about cool set pieces they can try out.

    Sharks will be scary again next year when the Stath starts punching them!

    I take your point but this is for me the inherent problem with sequels to films like Jaws and Alien. They were never meant to have sequels, they were designed as thrill rides based on a singular, simple premise. When you start making sequels its forcing things that were never meant to be because you can only see a shark stalk and eat someone so many ways before it becomes stale.

    What Cameron did with Aliens was genius but its an exception to the rule.

  13. Paranoid Android
    I get what you're saying and agree to an extent but giving the audience too much information isn't the only problem. Familiarity and the use of a movie monster also lessons the impact. The Alien has been so over exposed and often misused that its lost its power to generate fear in audiences. This problem set in long before the prequels.

    Its possible to make a scary Alien movie again but its a huge ask and the fear has to come from something fresh because the egg - facehugger -
     Alien isn't going to cut it anymore.
    I definitely agree that focusing on the lifecycle itself isn't going to cut it. Focusing on it was scary when it was new. Now that it's established, the horror should focus simply on the threat behind it. This is something Alien:Isolation got and one of the reasons it worked so well: They didn't waste your time following the alien's lifecycle; You arrive to Sevastopol, and it's already there and fully grown. Now that you're stuck with this monster - what do you do?

    Quote
    I'm more than happy with Covenant but if you want an Alien movie which has broader appeal then I don't think tying to go the horror route will work. It needs to go down the action route for me and I don't have a problem with that providing its not the Blomkamp route of writing off 3 and creating Aliens 2.0 or the silliness of resurrection/AvP.
    I definitely prefer the horror route, but I agree that as an action film it has more of a mass appeal potential, and I'm fine either way. I don't really care what genre the film will be, as long as they don't misuse the alien in it.
  14. SiL
    Everyone knows what a shark is and what it does. Jaws was still terrifying. It stopped being scary when the sequels got dumb and the craftsmanship in the filmmaking disappeared completely.

    The wheel doesn't need to be reinvented, someone just has to treat the creature with the same tact and care it was given at the start. That's where things go to shit: the filmmakers stop caring about the presentation and start thinking more about cool set pieces they can try out.
  15. Jonesy1974


    Firstly, men with knives aren't scary. Its the character holding the knife that's scary and once that character becomes too familiar they are no longer scary. Michael Myers was a scary man with a knife the first time round but he hasn't been scary since.
    Michael Myers is actually a fun example because you knew what he does after the first 5 minutes of Halloween. He stopped being scary in sequels, when people started explaining him away and telling people who he is. He was scary when he had a vague backstory, and stopped being scary once filmmakers started making a point out of telling his backstory. This is very similar to another movie monster we know.

    I get what you're saying and agree to an extent but giving the audience too much information isn't the only problem. Familiarity and the use of a movie monster also lessons the impact. The Alien has been so over exposed and often misused that its lost its power to generate fear in audiences. This problem set in long before the prequels.

    Its possible to make a scary Alien movie again but its a huge ask and the fear has to come from something fresh because the egg - facehugger -
     Alien isn't going to cut it anymore.

    I'm more than happy with Covenant but if you want an Alien movie which has broader appeal then I don't think tying to go the horror route will work. It needs to go down the action route for me and I don't have a problem with that providing its not the Blomkamp route of writing off 3 and creating Aliens 2.0 or the silliness of resurrection/AvP.

    I still feel Ridley can deliver that film if he gets the chance to make a third.
  16. Paranoid Android
    Actually, the only part people from both the fanboy and hater camps seem to agree on is that the backburster scene in Covenant was scary (in my case, at least to a point).

    And yes, of course the chestburster scene in the original Alien succeeded because Kane was a likeable character. But it wasn't just about him; The scene succeeded because everyone else were likeable characters. It wasn't just Kane dying in that scene - it was everyone else watching him die.

    Likeable characters is what sets the stakes. If you don't care about the characters, there are no stakes to them dying. If there are no stakes, there is no threat. If there is no threat, your horror film has failed.
  17. Kane's other son
    Covenant featured the best alien-bursting-from-a-human-body scene since 1979. It's no longer scary (and more importantly disturbing) because we've seen it before. The same with aliens stalking people in dark corridors and shafts or swarming a barricaded compartment. It's all familiar. You know how it will play out.
    I don't think there' anyone against good characters, but keep in mind that in Alien the characters are archetypes. It's not like the chestburster scene succeeded because Kane was such a compelling character.
  18. Paranoid Android
    They no longer are. That's why the slasher genre has faded into obscurity, and why the law of diminishing returns has hurt all Halloween/Friday the 13th/etc. sequels.
    You missed the point entirely.

    I was talking about simply featuring a person with a knife in your film. Those things haven't faded into anything; They are still heavily featured in horror films. The Babadook, for example. This was to counter the argument that knowing what your movie monster does makes it not scary. People have seen men with knives kill people in horror films since at least Psycho. The very fact that slasher films were created in the first place counters the notion that once you know what a monster does, it stops being scary.

    You're talking about a film genre, which is an incorrect comparison because the comparison was to the alien as a monster, and the alien isn't a genre. It's just a monster. What bores people today isn't a man with a knife - it's the tropes of the slasher genre.

    I could've made my argument with Ghosts and Demons and the point would've still been the same: Just because you know what a monster does, doesn't make it not scary.

    Firstly, men with knives aren't scary. Its the character holding the knife that's scary and once that character becomes too familiar they are no longer scary. Michael Myers was a scary man with a knife the first time round but he hasn't been scary since.
    Michael Myers is actually a fun example because you knew what he does after the first 5 minutes of Halloween. He stopped being scary in sequels, when people started explaining him away and telling people who he is. He was scary when he had a vague backstory, and stopped being scary once filmmakers started making a point out of telling his backstory. This is very similar to another movie monster we know.
  19. Highland
    Was there ever an excuse not to have good characters?

    Anything can be scary with the right mood, shots and audio. I find parts of Alien 3 genuinely scary just because of how the scenes unfold. Watching two guys pet a snake beast or someone having a shower with Dr Dre playing full blast definitely isn't on the list though.
  20. Scorpio
    There's so much you could still do with the alien to make it scary again.  Egg morphing, for example.  Seeing how an alien captures a victim and starts to turn it into an egg.  That could really bring back the horror of the alien.  Rather than just a slasher type villain in space.
  21. Jonesy1974
    Firstly, men with knives aren't scary. Its the character holding the knife that's scary and once that character becomes too familiar they are no longer scary. Michael Myers was a scary man with a knife the first time round but he hasn't been scary since.

    Having characters you care about in a film doesn't make it scary either. It generates tension because you are fearful for the characters survival but that's not the same thing as being scary. I didn't give a damn about any of the characters in the original TCM but it still frightened me. Again, Leatherface hasn't been scary since.

    The Alien suffers the same problem, its too familiar to frighten people. That doesn't mean you cant make an effective movie featuring the Alien and for me that's exactly what Ridley has done.
  22. Rudiger
    Because you form an emotional attachment and feel bad when they're killed, or abducted like Newt was in Aliens, but then later when she's saved and all the bad monsters are dead you feel happy because the "decent characters" are alive and well. Then as the movie ends you sit up and clap until your hands are sore.
    Or some bullshit like that.

    Good to see that your dislike of Aliens doesn't get in the way of at least understanding why the film is so effective.
  23. Highland
    Well it's not scary mostly because it's about David. The Alien even in Covenant is just a sideshow. The only genuinely scary(ish) part is in the hanger which just unfolds exactly as Daniels already planned. The first half of the movie not involving David is better. The backburster scene is very good, spoiled only by the trailer.
  24. tleilaxu
    How can facehuggers, chestbursters, and xenos be scary again after we already know how each one of these kill people?

    Oh that's easy. Write decent characters that the audience actually cares about.

    ...but we already know what eggs, facehuggers, chestbursters, and xenos do? How do 'decent characters' change this?
    Because you form an emotional attachment and feel bad when they're killed, or abducted like Newt was in Aliens, but then later when she's saved and all the bad monsters are dead you feel happy because the "decent characters" are alive and well. Then as the movie ends you sit up and clap until your hands are sore.
    Or some bullshit like that.
  25. Alionic
    Quote
    Scott: I think the Beast is almost run out
    Then just step the hell back and let someone who still has a passion for this franchise and creature, direct a movie fans really want to see and deserve. Then maybe people don't have to go through philosophical bullshit and Alien-Puking androids with a Wagner-fetish. This is some high quality Strause-Level bullshit.

    How can facehuggers, chestbursters, and xenos be scary again after we already know how each one of these kill people?
  26. 0321recon
    Hardly surprised by this news from Ridley.

    If you listen to his commentary of A:Covenant you get a very strong sense of someone who's just going through motions,which is a big contrast to his Prometheus commentary where his enthusiam for the film was strongly evident.

    It definitely seems so. Scott even mentions "well I was right after all" or something to that extant, like he was indeed against having Aliens in it. I can see the producers forcing creative control of Alien Covenant.

    I could see the producers being the ones who forced Ridley to cut out Noomi from the film sans the few seconds of screen time of her disemboweled corpse  :'(

    Were lucky that at least we got to see the bombing sequence.
  27. bleau
    Hardly surprised by this news from Ridley.

    If you listen to his commentary of A:Covenant you get a very strong sense of someone who's just going through motions,which is a big contrast to his Prometheus commentary where his enthusiam for the film was strongly evident.

    It definitely seems so. Scott even mentions "well I was right after all" or something to that extant, like he was indeed against having Aliens in it. I can see the producers forcing creative control of Alien Covenant.
  28. Bojo
    Hardly surprised by this news from Ridley.

    If you listen to his commentary of A:Covenant you get a very strong sense of someone who's just going through motions,which is a big contrast to his Prometheus commentary where his enthusiam for the film was strongly evident.
  29. Johnny Handsome
    Quote
    Scott: I think the Beast is almost run out
    Then just step the hell back and let someone who still has a passion for this franchise and creature, direct a movie fans really want to see and deserve. Then maybe people don't have to go through philosophical bullshit and Alien-Puking androids with a Wagner-fetish. This is some high quality Strause-Level bullshit.

    Canceling the Alien for the next one and bringing in new (yet lame) creatures won't make the movie any better if your story is shit from the start. If you don't have trust in the creature (which is the core of the franchise) then why make a sequel/prequel? Make something new, but i understand... you can't cash in on the fans then. They don't even have a point up until now, we still don't know how the derelict got there.

    I thought Covenant was a step into the right direction for the franchise, going back to the horror elements that were sorely missed from Prometheus, but having seen two big budget movies now i think Alien works better in smaller yet more powerful and inventive films.

    I think they should really just totally reboot the franchise, set it after all the Alien films with brand new characters (No Ripley clones please), you can have the classic Alien and new creatures and make it all much more interesting.
  30. Jonesy1974
    I've never read a western before and I'm not sure if I'll like it but then it is described as being like a horror so that intrigues me. Would you view it as horror?

    It's quite similar in structure to Bone Tomahawk, in that a big chunk of the book is about the journey towards confrontation. However, the villain of the piece isn't anything like the cannibal troglodytes. He's very much human. A really nasty piece of work with a particularly horrifying technique when it comes to torture. It's definietly horrific in places, but it's not a horror story.

    Ok cheers, that's helpful to know.
  31. Rudiger
    I've never read a western before and I'm not sure if I'll like it but then it is described as being like a horror so that intrigues me. Would you view it as horror?

    It's quite similar in structure to Bone Tomahawk, in that a big chunk of the book is about the journey towards confrontation. However, the villain of the piece isn't anything like the cannibal troglodytes. He's very much human. A really nasty piece of work with a particularly horrifying technique when it comes to torture. It's definietly horrific in places, but it's not a horror story.
  32. Jonesy1974
    I've read Wraiths of the Broken Land and Mean Business on North Ganson Street, both of which are great, and am about to start Corpus Chrome, Inc. Copies of A Congregation of Jackals seem to be as rare as rocking horse droppings, which is a shame.

    Next up for Zahler is Dragged Across Concrete, with Mel Gibson and Vince Vaughn, plus others from Brawl...

    And let's hope that Ridley Scott doesn't screw up Wraiths... If done right, it should be the stuff of nightmares.

    I fancy trying his books, which one would you recommend to start with, Wraiths?

    What are you in the mood for? Wraiths is a western, and follows a rag-tag family searching for their sisters who have been kidnapped and forced into prostitution. Mean Business is a present-day story about a disgraced detective investigating a series of cop killings. They are both really good. He writes really good characters and dialogue (not overly "showy" like, say, Tarantino), and everything zips along. His books are also clearly written with the big screen in mind. Of the two I preferred Mean Business.

    I've never read a western before and I'm not sure if I'll like it but then it is described as being like a horror so that intrigues me. Would you view it as horror?
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