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Alien Covenant 2 Will Focus on David & Artificial Intelligence

During the latest episode of the Empire podcast (via Screenrant), Ridley Scott was interviewed to promote Blade Runner 2049 and gave a few more details about the potential sequel to Alien Covenant. As expected, the film revolves around Michael Fassbender’s android character David.

At the end of Alien Covenant, we saw David had taken over the colony ship and was en route to Origae-6. In a sequel, it very much sounds like the Xenomorphs will take a back seat and we’ll see the world that David creates on the new planet. Skip to 54:30 in the podcast to the listen the Covenant segment.

“I think the evolution of the Alien himself is nearly over, but what I was trying to do was transcend and move to another story, which would be taken over by A.I.’s. The world that the AI might create as a leader if he finds himself on a new planet. We have actually quite a big layout for the next one – Covenant 2”

We last heard a few months ago that 20th Century Fox were ‘reassessing‘ the future of the Alien franchise after Covenant’s disappointing box office returns. Scott continues to say he made Prometheus for a good price and it made $460 million and Alien Covenant was made for the same budget four years later and did well again. He says he’ll be working a new movie soon which he’ll reveal in a couple of weeks.

 Alien Covenant 2 Will Focus on David & Artificial Intelligence

Alien Covenant 2 will revolve more around David and less around Xenomorphs.

It’s unknown whether or not Katherine Waterston will return but the Alien Covenant 2 script has already been finished. Scott has previously said that Engineers will play a bigger role in the sequel and they will find out that their planet has been destroyed. I guess we’ll find out more news in the coming months – this all depends on whether or not Fox greenlights the project in the first place.

Thanks to Ingwar for the news.



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  1. TWJones
    The Martian is another example of a sci-fi film doing really well, and perhaps serves to prove the point that it's not necessarily the genre, but rather how it's done, that fills seats.

    Maybe people are tired of so many movie that depict ETs as wanting to kill us. Personally, I would love to see more realistic sci-fi films like The Martian, Interstellar, and even Contact.
  2. Paranoid Android
    Robots, space ships, aliens, blasters, lightsabers, inter-galactic travel, dystopian society. Of course it's sci-fi.

    Science-fiction:
    fiction based on imagined future scientific or technological advances and major social or environmental changes, frequently portraying space or time travel and life on other planets.

    https://i.ytimg.com/vi/_6Q8bpTaSH4/maxresdefault.jpg

    https://jamilnyc.files.wordpress.com/2013/01/star-destroyer.png

    https://vignette.wikia.nocookie.net/starwars/images/f/fd/Mos_Eisley.png/revision/latest?cb=20121208215412

    http://overmental.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/TempestForceEndor-ROTJ.png

    Did you read your own definition? What exactly happened there?
  3. Baron Von Marlon
    Robots, space ships, aliens, blasters, lightsabers, inter-galactic travel, dystopian society. Of course it's sci-fi.

    Science-fiction:
    fiction based on imagined future scientific or technological advances and major social or environmental changes, frequently portraying space or time travel and life on other planets.

    Almost everything in the movie is made to look cool all while throwing science out the window. It's grounded in fantasy.
    With the addition of the force it's basically knights and wizards in space.
    The movie even starts like some fairytale: "A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away."
  4. Jonesy1974
    Technically Star Wars is si-fi but we all know it's a ompletley different beast so isn't relevant to a discussion on sci fi BO in my opinion.

    Arrival did well compared to budget but for bums on seats it didn't set the world alight even though it had glowing reviews.

  5. SuicideDoors
    There is one fundamental error to this reasoning. Audiences didn't reject Scott's Engineer / David mythology. There's no evidence (the posts of some opinionated hardcore fans are anecdotal, at best).
     Audiences just don't care for yet another chestbursting scene. It's more of the same. There are no surprises. The beast is cooked.
    If Alien is to survive, it has to move even further into Prometheus territory.

    No offence but that's just rubbish.

    There is one fundamental error to this reasoning. Audiences didn't reject Scott's Engineer / David mythology. There's no evidence (the posts of some opinionated hardcore fans are anecdotal, at best).
    Other than the hard data documenting the film's nosedive at the box office on its second week, you mean:
    http://www.digitalspy.com/movies/alien/news/a829385/alien-covenant-drops-us-box-office-second-week/

    Alien:Covenant's box office figures tell a very simple story: People gave it a chance on its first week, saw how terrible the film is, spread the word and doomed the film's box office chances.

    Absolutely this. Covenant was savaged by word of mouth. Lots of evidence to support this as well with its poor Cinemascore rating, negative Rotten Tomatoes audience score and a simple trawl through Twitter.

    I don't think the beast is cooked, I just think Scott f**ked it.
  6. Paranoid Android
    Blade Runner 2049 is actually a pretty good example to prove my point: The film might be a flop, but it is still in the domestic top 5 as far as box office is concerned, which tells me that while the film doesn't really have enough of an audience to turn a profit (shouldn't be much of a surprise if you ask me, considering that neither did the original), the people who do see it keep coming back for more. Hell, the film made more on its 4th week than Covenant did on its 2nd week, and Covenant had the stronger box office opening...
  7. Jonesy1974
    Alien:Covenant's box office figures tell a very simple story: People gave it a chance on its first week, saw how terrible the film is, spread the word and doomed the film's box office chances.

    Precisely. None of this is rocket science.

    Not necessarily, the drop off may have happened anyway. I personally just don't think audiences have much of an appetite for sci-fi at the moment.

    I cant think of any recent sci-fi movie that has been a BO success.

  8. Paranoid Android
    There is one fundamental error to this reasoning. Audiences didn't reject Scott's Engineer / David mythology. There's no evidence (the posts of some opinionated hardcore fans are anecdotal, at best).
    Other than the hard data documenting the film's nosedive at the box office on its second week, you mean:
    http://www.digitalspy.com/movies/alien/news/a829385/alien-covenant-drops-us-box-office-second-week/

    Alien:Covenant's box office figures tell a very simple story: People gave it a chance on its first week, saw how terrible the film is, spread the word and doomed the film's box office chances.
  9. Kane's other son
    There is one fundamental error to this reasoning. Audiences didn't reject Scott's Engineer / David mythology. There's no evidence (the posts of some opinionated hardcore fans are anecdotal, at best).
     Audiences just don't care for yet another chestbursting scene. It's more of the same. There are no surprises. The beast is cooked.
    If Alien is to survive, it has to move even further into Prometheus territory.
  10. Corporal Hicks
    I really hope not. I honestly don't mind something like a soft reboot like all the recent films have kind of been. Set in the same universe, out the way and doing their own thing. But you know, just something good.
  11. Corporal Hicks
    Personally, I still don't agree with that. I just think it's the direction that the prequels took their creation. If it'd have been some ancient tool of destruction created by some equally ancient and God-like race, I'd have been happy. Just not keen on it being a roundabout creation of mankind and made a decade or so before Alien.
  12. The Crusher
    I've never been happy about David being the creator of the xenomorphs. The franchise can still be fixed by reversing this. Alien 1979 held so much mysterious darkness, that I feel like that has been ruined by Alien Covenant.
  13. Marcus9000
    I just hope in the next movie we find out that David recreated the Xenomorph.  The Xenomorph, we know, being a forbidden weapon that has not been used or allowed to be used for thousands of years (Alien 1 Derelict) resulting in the complete extermination of David and any loose ends.

    That would be far more satisfying I think.

    I want the alien universe to be widened not narrowed by humans or androids creating the xenomorph.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
  14. Alex Delarge
    I have been a fan of alien since the first movie came out but since I watched the latest movie I have given up on the series and gradually thrown away or sold everything alien related. What a disappointment, :(  ???  ::)

    If Scott didn't want to make another another movie, then why didn't he just make a completely different movie? Why sign on to the Alien franchise just to turn it into something else entirely?
  15. HABIT
    Why even think about size difference? The juggernaut in Alien has even much larger halls and rooms, there wasnt any stairs, hyper sleep chambers or control panel with green energy in it. Ridley needed Engineers smaller, because now its not some creatures inside some telescope device, but the actual human actors. The fact is, that Space Jockey has mouth, teeth and eyes. . Jesus its clear enough, it meant to be an extraterrestial animal looking creature. . maybe even without any legs, and not some white looking humanoid. Is it not evident? Original Space Jockey could be propably made by CGI, it should be much bigger than Engineers and it would be a challenge for whole creative team behind the film.  :'(
    Mhm.
  16. Petr Švancara
    Why even think about size difference? The juggernaut in Alien has even much larger halls and rooms, there wasnt any stairs, hyper sleep chambers or control panel with green energy in it. Ridley needed Engineers smaller, because now its not some creatures inside some telescope device, but the actual human actors. The fact is, that Space Jockey has mouth, teeth and eyes. . Jesus its clear enough, it meant to be an extraterrestial animal looking creature. . maybe even without any legs, and not some white looking humanoid. Is it not evident? Original Space Jockey could be propably made by CGI, it should be much bigger than Engineers and it would be a challenge for whole creative team behind the film.  :'(
  17. Baron Von Marlon
    I never bought the derelict housed the massive chamber with the eggs. I always liked the theory of a facility under the ship.

    Originally the egg chamber was in a separate building, belonging to aliens who once lived on the planet.
    And the derelict belonged to other aliens who visited the planet and went to the building.
    But it was too expensive so they merged the ideas.

    The creators always said Alien is a b-movie with an a-movie budget.

    I mean that the original space jockey is huge in relation to Dallas, Lambert and Kane, as well as David and the engineers we see in Prometheus. You can see that in the long shots and the close ups. If they don't stay faithful to that, they will have failed in my book.

    It's easier to cast tall actors for Engineers, instead of using cgi to enlarge them.
    It's cheaper to build sets suitable for those taller than the average human, but not giant-sized.

    I'm sure if special effects were better and if money was no object, we had giant Engineers, giant ships, giant buildings,...
  18. Rudiger
    As SM pointed out, Alien itself already 'failed' in that regard - the SJ's a lot smaller when Dallas and Lambert get right up next to it.

    That said, I agree with you: keep the SJ/Engineer at Luke n' Jake scale, please!

    Yeah, but there was no "sinister" intent. Didn't they use children dressed in space suits for the establishing shots to enhance the illusion, and then a different model for the close ups. All that means was that the scale was off. That's just a simple continuity mistake.

    What's clear though is that the jockey is significantly larger than David (or an other human), as well as the engineers in Prometheus.
  19. Mr. Clemens
    As SM pointed out, Alien itself already 'failed' in that regard - the SJ's a lot smaller when Dallas and Lambert get right up next to it.

    That said, I agree with you: keep the SJ/Engineer at Luke n' Jake scale, please!
  20. Rudiger
    You mean the difference in Alien between actors and scale doubles depending on the shot?

    I mean that the original space jockey is huge in relation to Dallas, Lambert and Kane, as well as David and the engineers we see in Prometheus. You can see that in the long shots and the close ups. If they don't stay faithful to that, they will have failed in my book.
  21. Olde
    I never bought the derelict housed the massive chamber with the eggs. I always liked the theory of a facility under the ship. With that being said, it still could have housed the black goo like the ship in Covenant. The beacon is still active, warning of the goo, not eggs. I believe that David finds the crashed/landed ship and proceeds to transform the colonists on the Covenant into eggs or creates eggs from them. With a facility underneath, he stores them and waits for a passing ship. Just a thought.
    That could very well be the case and makes sense. After A:C but before Alien:

    David finds a planetoid (LV-426) close enough to another engineer world (either homeworld or a planet colonised by them) to lure others to his location. David buries the Covenant just below the surface and sends out a distress beacon to lure said ships onto the planetoid. He spends roughly ten or so years using the embryos and colonists on the Covenant for his experimentation, creating eggs out of most of them. An Engineer ship comes along and lands on the planet. David tests his handiwork; maybe on the engineers, maybe on Daniels and Tennessee, maybe on both. Due to unforeseen events, he eventually gets his back pushed against a wall and has seemingly no way out. He dons a space engineer suit, absorbs some black goo, and grows to roughly 20 times his size (the black goo can apparently do anything in this universe, so why the hell not?). With his superior strength, he kills anyone and everyone who stands in his way, but in one last ditch effort, the final survivor tricks him into getting facehugged. He wakes up some time later but scoffs as he believes he's immune to the facehugger's effects. However, due to the black goo, he's somehow developed DNA and is more or less a living organism capable of harboring an alien inside (as I said, the black goo is basically a writer's way to have anything happen, so why the hell not). He gets in the iconic chair and prepares to take off but a chestburster bursts from him. He makes some last words that are supposed to be poignant but make the audience roll their eyes. Fire breaks out somehow and chars his body and burns part of the ship, including the alien. The ship's distress beacon goes off automatically. In a post-credits scene, we see W-Y receive the signal and order their nearest cargo ship to investigate.

    I know it reads like fanfic, but honestly, I don't imagine the next movie really deviating all that much from the above.
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