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Updated: Aliens: Bug Hunt – Aliens Anthology Announced!

Aliens: Bug Hunt, the first Aliens anthology novel has been announced! Breaking the news via Facebook, Jonathan Maberry has revealed that he is editing a brand new Aliens anthology novel focusing on the Colonial Marines to be published in 2017 by Titan!

” I’m editing ALIENS: BUG HUNT, all new stories of the Colonial Marines (Titan Books, 2017) Here’s the killer lineup!
1. Brian Keene is a best-selling horror author and comic book writer. His landmark novel The Rising helped establish the genre of zombie literature.
2. Christopher Goldenn, #1 New York Times best-selling author, editor and comic book writer. His works include Tin Men, Lord Baltimore (with Mike Mignola), Cemetery Girl (with Charlaine Harris), and Aliens: River of Pain.
3. Dan Abnett is a multiple New York Times best-selling author and comic book writer who’s work includes the Gaunt’s Ghosts series, The Horus Heresy, Doctor Who, and the Guardians of the Galaxy comic that inspired the motion picture.
4. David Farland, is a New York Times award-winning author who has worked with Star Wars, the Mummy, and his own bestselling fantasy Runelords series.
5. Heather Graham Pozzessere: International best-selling author of over seventy suspense novels.
6. James A. Moore, is a best selling author of twenty-five novels including his own Seven Forges series who has also worked with Aliens, Buffy the Vampire Slayer and the World Of Darkness.
7. Jonathan Maberry, NY Times bestselling author of Patient Zero, Rot & Ruin, and many other novels; anthology editor and comic book writer.
8. Keith DeCandido iis a Scribe finalist whose works include Star Trek, Supernatural, Stargate SG-1, and many others.
9. Larry Correia is the bestselling author of the Monster Hunter International series, the Grimnoir Chronicles, and the Dead Six military thrillers
10. Matt Forbeck is a New York Times bestselling author and award-winning game designer whose latest works include Halo: New Blood, the Marvel Encyclopedia, and his Shotguns & Sorcery series.
11. Mike Resnickk is a best-selling author of military science fiction, including The Outpost, The Dead Enders series, and many more; and has edited dozens of anthologies. He has won multiple Hugo Awards, the Homer Award, the Skylark Award, as well as many international awards.
12. Paul Kupperberg is a former editor in chief for DC Comics, and a prolific writer of comic books and newspaper strips.
13. Rachel Caine, New York Times bestselling author of almost 50 thriller, SF/F, and YA novels, including Ink and Bone, and the Morganville Vampires series.
14. Ray Garton, bestselling author of over sixty books and recipient of the Grandmaster Award from the World Horror Convention.
15. Scott Sigler, NY Times bestselling author of INFECTED and the ALIVE, Book I of the Generations Trilogy.
16. Tim Lebbon, is the best-selling author of Coldbrook, The Cabin in the Woods, the Noreela series of fantasy books (Dusk, Dawn, Fallen and The Island), the NY Times Bestselling novelisation of the movie 30 Days of Night, Alien: Out of the Shadows, and Star Wars: Dawn of the Jedi – Into the Void.
17. Weston Ochse, USA Today New and Notable List, Bram Stoker Award-winning author of SEAL Team 666 and Grunt Life
18. Yvonne Navarro, Bram Stoker award-winning author of the Dark Redemption Series, Aliens: Music of the Spears, and seven Buffy the Vampire Slayer novels.”

Aliens: Bug Hunt, a brand new anthology focusing on the Colonial Marines, is due for release in 2017.  Aliens: Bug Hunt - Aliens Anthology Announced!

Aliens: Bug Hunt, a brand new anthology focusing on the Colonial Marines, is due for release in 2017.

That extensive list of authors includes several returning veterans of Alien literature (Tim Lebbon, Christopher Golden, Dan Abnet, James Moore and Yvonne Navarro) but also welcomes an impressive 13 new names to the Alien authors club!

Aliens: Bug Hunt is currently slated for a release in 2017 but no further details are available as of yet. Keep checking back with Alien vs. Predator Galaxy for more details. Thanks to Willie Goldman for the news!

Update #1 (11/05/2016) – Keith R.A. DeCandido has shared some details about his entry in Aliens: Bug Hunt via his LiveJournal: “Called “Deep Background,” the story is about a reporter who is embedded with a group of Colonial Marines, and things do not go as planned.”



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  1. HuDaFuK
    Speaking of Fury 161, I've just had a preview of Aliens Defiance number 2 and the beach from the opening scene of Alien 3 with the giant cranes is seen in the background of a colonial marines battle. Possibly quelling some kind of massive prisoner uprising?

    The kinda of firepower on display in that scene makes it pretty obvious they aren't fighting prisoners who don't even have access to firearms.

    Nothing to say it's not some other random planet simply inspired by the look of Fury.
  2. The Alien Predator
    Some details from Tim Lebbon via his Facebook: "I'm in this, writing about the mighty Colonial Marines and aliens that *aren't* xenomorphs (after 4 books, I thought I'd done those sweet critters enough ...)."

    YYYEEESSSS!!!!!!!!!

    IT'S HAPPENING!

    LITERALLY MAN!

    It might be some kind of new alien beast.

    Or it could be an technological and intelligent alien race that is hostile, just like River of Pain and Incursion mentioned in one lines. Finally those one lines may be turned into a story!

    Maybe even Arcturians show up finally. After so many mentions and that "there are plans for them" hint.
  3. LordCassusSnow
    Speaking of Fury 161, I've just had a preview of Aliens Defiance number 2 and the beach from the opening scene of Alien 3 with the giant cranes is seen in the background of a colonial marines battle. Possibly quelling some kind of massive prisoner uprising?
  4. Corporal Hicks
    Some details from Tim Lebbon via his Facebook: "I'm in this, writing about the mighty Colonial Marines and aliens that *aren't* xenomorphs (after 4 books, I thought I'd done those sweet critters enough ...)."
  5. The Alien Predator
    Indigenous life on the wind-swept planet is extremely
    limited. Plant life consists of algae, moss, and a primitive
    type of salt grass. The acidic oceans support plankton and a
    few rudimentary fishlike species; on land, there are insects
    and arthropods. One of these arthropods—an ectoparasite
    similar to pediculus humanus capitis (head lice) but
    extremely resistant to treatment—is carnivorous and is
    drawn to the keratin found in mammalian hair. Inhabitants of
    Fiorina 161 were forced to continually shave all body hair.


    WYR - pp129

    Thanks for sharing that, SM, that was really interesting.
  6. Local Trouble
    Indigenous life on the wind-swept planet is extremely
    limited. Plant life consists of algae, moss, and a primitive
    type of salt grass. The acidic oceans support plankton and a
    few rudimentary fishlike species; on land, there are insects
    and arthropods. One of these arthropods—an ectoparasite
    similar to pediculus humanus capitis (head lice) but
    extremely resistant to treatment—is carnivorous and is
    drawn to the keratin found in mammalian hair. Inhabitants of
    Fiorina 161 were forced to continually shave all body hair.


    WYR - pp129

    http://i63.tinypic.com/2utiyr5.gif
  7. SM
    Indigenous life on the wind-swept planet is extremely
    limited. Plant life consists of algae, moss, and a primitive
    type of salt grass. The acidic oceans support plankton and a
    few rudimentary fishlike species; on land, there are insects
    and arthropods. One of these arthropods—an ectoparasite
    similar to pediculus humanus capitis (head lice) but
    extremely resistant to treatment—is carnivorous and is
    drawn to the keratin found in mammalian hair. Inhabitants of
    Fiorina 161 were forced to continually shave all body hair.


    WYR - pp129
  8. The Alien Predator
    The Alien 3 novel states the oceans are a little acidic. And its possible humans could have broughr lice and that parasite evolved due to hostile conditions. It was briefly mentioned in Aliens Invasion i believe. Where humans unwittingly bring along vermin and they evolve on whatever planet they now inhabit.

    Oh yeah.

    Also Out of the Shadows mentions some space fleas that infest human ships. And we see this weird bug in Alien: Resurrection, in the alternative intro.

    Maybe the fleas of Fury could've come from another world by taking a ride on human ships.
  9. LordCassusSnow
    The Alien 3 novel states the oceans are a little acidic. And its possible humans could have broughr lice and that parasite evolved due to hostile conditions. It was briefly mentioned in Aliens Invasion i believe. Where humans unwittingly bring along vermin and they evolve on whatever planet they now inhabit.
  10. Xenomrph
    Exactly, plus Fury could've been terraformed.

    Didn't it have indigenous life?  That would seem to indicate it was naturally habitable.

    As I said in an old post, it was always strange to me that a (by our current standards) rare gem of a planet like Fiorina wouldn't be massively colonized, given its atmosphere and gravity were obviously suitable for long-term human habitation.

    Then again, it seems to me that the entire planet was the company's private property and not some cooperative effort between Weyland-Yutani and Colonial Administration like LV-426 was.

    Hell, maybe artificially engineered "shake and bake" colonies end up being preferable to human settlers than naturally habitable but otherwise unattractive shitholes like Fiorina.

    I was thinking the same thing, actually.

    Without reading the thread you linked, I could come up with a couple scenarios off the top of my head. Maybe, being an already-habitable planet, Fiorina is one of the "older" colonies (as in, more time for the Company to pollute it, f**k it up, and then bail), or perhaps it's at the crossroads of popular trade routes which make it a convenient dumping ground (or conversely, it's at the ass-end of nowhere, making it unappealing for long-term colonization).

    Or like you said, terraforming planets with mining opportunities might be more appealing and profitable than colonizing already-habitable planets that just have real estate and not much else.
  11. The Alien Predator
    Fiorina wasn't terraformed. They just found it like that.

    Where was that stated? I'm curious.

    Exactly, plus Fury could've been terraformed.

    Didn't it have indigenous life?  That would seem to indicate it was naturally habitable.

    As I said in an old post, it was always strange to me that a (by our current standards) rare gem of a planet like Fiorina wouldn't be massively colonized, given its atmosphere and gravity were obviously suitable for long-term human habitation.

    Then again, it seems to me that the entire planet was the company's private property and not some cooperative effort between Weyland-Yutani and Colonial Administration like LV-426 was.

    Hell, maybe artificially engineered "shake and bake" colonies end up being preferable to human settlers than naturally habitable but otherwise unattractive shitholes like Fiorina.


    I always thought the flea problem was something that humans could've brought along with them from another world. Like how we accidentally spread rats all over Earth from their native countries.
  12. Local Trouble
    Exactly, plus Fury could've been terraformed.

    Didn't it have indigenous life?  That would seem to indicate it was naturally habitable.

    As I said in an old post, it was always strange to me that a (by our current standards) rare gem of a planet like Fiorina wouldn't be massively colonized, given its atmosphere and gravity were obviously suitable for long-term human habitation.

    Then again, it seems to me that the entire planet was the company's private property and not some cooperative effort between Weyland-Yutani and Colonial Administration like LV-426 was.

    Hell, maybe artificially engineered "shake and bake" colonies end up being preferable to human settlers than naturally habitable but otherwise unattractive shitholes like Fiorina.

    Fiorina wasn't terraformed. They just found it like that.

    Quote
    Was Fiorina terraformed?  That fact that it had indigenous life indicates to me that it wasn't.

    I should've emphasised 'after' in my post as I meant to suggest that this could be the after picture rather than before.

    He never gave a straight answer to the question, but as a Juilliard-trained SMologist, I can confidently state that he never outright said it was terraformed.

     :laugh:
  13. Xenomrph
    Also what did you mean by "breathable fury"?

    I assume he means Fiorina having a naturally-breathable atmosphere.
    Earth has a naturally breathable atmosphere, why can't another planet? NASA is finding potentially habitable earth-like extrasolar planets on a daily basis.

    Read it again. And xenomrph i'm right with you on that. There are many glaring errors in the films and books that are hard to ignore. Some of which clashes with existing material such as The WY Report vs ACM Tech Manual, and Alien The Illustrated story vs Alien Isolation, to name a couple. I for one would like this stuff polished over and redistributed with updates like James Cameron did for the special edition of Aliens. I definitely enjoy Aliens a little better now without that error in film that looks like a twister when the Jordan family discover the derelict. Or the Alien warrior with bungie cords attatched leaping after Ripley when she's rescuing Newt. It's also getting a bit laughable the tech used in Alien 1-3. Our technology has progressed quite a bit since the 70's and 80's. Maybe fox should have moved the time back and said humanity in the Alien/Predator universe had reached other planets well before 1970? The mention of cholera not being reported for 200 years in Alien 3 would also make sense in that regard.

    So, you want them to go back and digitally give them holograms and laser guns...?
    If Spielberg can put walkie-talkies in ET...

    (I'm being facetious)
  14. SM
    Read it again. And xenomrph i'm right with you on that. There are many glaring errors in the films and books that are hard to ignore. Some of which clashes with existing material such as The WY Report vs ACM Tech Manual, and Alien The Illustrated story vs Alien Isolation, to name a couple. I for one would like this stuff polished over and redistributed with updates like James Cameron did for the special edition of Aliens. I definitely enjoy Aliens a little better now without that error in film that looks like a twister when the Jordan family discover the derelict. Or the Alien warrior with bungie cords attatched leaping after Ripley when she's rescuing Newt. It's also getting a bit laughable the tech used in Alien 1-3. Our technology has progressed quite a bit since the 70's and 80's. Maybe fox should have moved the time back and said humanity in the Alien/Predator universe had reached other planets well before 1970? The mention of cholera not being reported for 200 years in Alien 3 would also make sense in that regard.

    So, you want them to go back and digitally give them holograms and laser guns...?
  15. The Alien Predator
    Thanks for clearing that up for me, Xenomrph.  ;D

    I always rationalized "sounds" in space of the Alien movies to be ship radios picking up the sounds as it does scientifically make sense to me.

    I'm curious about blast waves. Would there be a blast wave after a ship explodes? I heard that if you detonate a nuke in space, there's no blast wave due to a lack of atmosphere and air, so if nukes were involved in a space battle, it'd either be a direct hit or you'd just be unlucky and be caught in the explosion the moment it happens or something.

    But in Alien, when the Nostromo explodes you see the Narcissus shook by the blast wave. Similar thing happened in AvP2010 when the Marlowe gets blown up by the Predators, the blast wave smacks your drop ship and eventually something slams into Rookie's head and knocks him out.

    Maybe it could be due to some tachyon drive rupture or other technobabble reasons why the blast waves are so violent in the Alien universe when it comes to explosions in space.
  16. Xenomrph
    Guys, im fine with 1200 km since the alien universe is quite a science bender. Sound in space anyone? Breathable Fury?
    But why accept it when it's so easily fixed (and was fixed like 20 years ago)? It's not like the 1200km thing actually serves a plot purpose or is used for narrative effect in any way, it's an honest-to-god mistake made by a scriptwriter without a scientific background (hell, the original 'Alien' script draft had the planet at 120km :D ).

    By sound in space I take it you mean the Nostromo exploding? That's used for dramatic effect (and the movie came out two years after Star Wars). Faster-than-light travel and artificial gravity are also nonsense concepts, but they're likewise used for storytelling purposes.
    The impossibly small size of LV-426, on the other hand, isn't.

    It begs the question, why accept the number just because a character speaks it, especially when that number is contradicted by on-screen evidence and basic common sense, and is so easily fixed?

    Also what did you mean by "breathable fury"?

    Quote
    But I've seen some sources say there's sound in space. You can even check out recordings of noises on youtube.

    However, I don't know if we'd actually hear an explosion in space.
    There's "sound" in the form of radio wave transmissions, since radio waves are just another part of the non-visible light spectrum. If the explosion has any output in the radio frequency range, you could conceivably "hear" it with a receiver.
    But hearing sound in the conventional sense of actual molecules vibrating? No, we wouldn't hear that.

    Shit, if you really wanted an explanation for the Nostromo's explosion sound, you could handwave it as literally being the Narcissus' radio receiver picking up the radio frequency waves caused by the blast. :P
  17. The Alien Predator
    Technically, there sort of is "sound" in space, there's just nothing in the vacuum for vibrations to bounce off of and into your ears.  :P

    But I've seen some sources say there's sound in space. You can even check out recordings of noises on youtube.

    However, I don't know if we'd actually hear an explosion in space.

    As for breathable Fury, I don't see how that's an issue in a world with atmospheric processors.
  18. Perfect-Organism
    Certainly. In Alien The Illustrated stroy, Dallas is the one to switch off the derelict's warning signal but in Alien Isolation its one of the crew from the Marlow who does this. Also, when compared to Alien, the engineer cockpit is much different than the one in Alien Isolation.
    To be fair it's also Dallas who shuts off the Derelict's beacon in the script and novelization, if I remember right. The 'Aliens' script treatment or novelization or something says that the beacon was damaged by seismic activity in the intervening years between 'Alien' and 'Aliens' as a way to explain why the Hadley's Hope never detected the beacon (I guess James Cameron forgot or wasn't aware that Dallas switched it off :P ). So if anything, Isolation was further retconning a retcon. :P

    To be really fair, the beacon's deactivation was never addressed openly in either of the films..
  19. Xenomrph
    Certainly. In Alien The Illustrated stroy, Dallas is the one to switch off the derelict's warning signal but in Alien Isolation its one of the crew from the Marlow who does this. Also, when compared to Alien, the engineer cockpit is much different than the one in Alien Isolation.
    To be fair it's also Dallas who shuts off the Derelict's beacon in the script and novelization, if I remember right. The 'Aliens' script treatment or novelization or something says that the beacon was damaged by seismic activity in the intervening years between 'Alien' and 'Aliens' as a way to explain why the Hadley's Hope never detected the beacon (I guess James Cameron forgot or wasn't aware that Dallas switched it off :P ). So if anything, Isolation was further retconning a retcon. :P
  20. LordCassusSnow
    Certainly. In Alien The Illustrated stroy, Dallas is the one to switch off the derelict's warning signal but in Alien Isolation its one of the crew from the Marlow who does this. Also, when compared to Alien, the engineer cockpit is much different than the one in Alien Isolation.
  21. LordCassusSnow
    Read it again. And xenomrph i'm right with you on that. There are many glaring errors in the films and books that are hard to ignore. Some of which clashes with existing material such as The WY Report vs ACM Tech Manual, and Alien The Illustrated story vs Alien Isolation, to name a couple. I for one would like this stuff polished over and redistributed with updates like James Cameron did for the special edition of Aliens. I definitely enjoy Aliens a little better now without that error in film that looks like a twister when the Jordan family discover the derelict. Or the Alien warrior with bungie cords attatched leaping after Ripley when she's rescuing Newt. It's also getting a bit laughable the tech used in Alien 1-3. Our technology has progressed quite a bit since the 70's and 80's. Maybe fox should have moved the time back and said humanity in the Alien/Predator universe had reached other planets well before 1970? The mention of cholera not being reported for 200 years in Alien 3 would also make sense in that regard.
  22. Xenomrph
    But these stories should really be looked at, not as THE definitive word but the perspectives of different people telling their own version of a story. Each story is a little different and its up to us to put each bit of information we receive together and make it make as much sense possible.
    I've taken this approach for years, I call it "fuzzy continuity". It's what allows things like both versions of 'Alien3' (or both versions of 'Alien') to coexist, despite having mutually exclusive scenes.
  23. LordCassusSnow
    In my opinion, arguing with Xenomrph on the scientific facts presented is basically pointless. The man knows his stuff. And i've certainly learned alot after today. Thank you sir! But these stories should really be looked at, not as THE definitive word but the perspectives of different people telling their own version of a story. Each story is a little different and its up to us to put each bit of information we receive together and make it make as much sense possible. Otherwise, explain to me why Calpamos is rust colored in Alien but blue in Prometheus? Fire and Stone states LV 223 orbits Calpamos sooooo? And how did Ripley n the gang survive the vacuum of space in Aliens??
  24. Xenomrph
    Quote
    What does SM say about it?
    I already know what SM says (he said it a couple pages ago), I'm asking you. :)

    Quote
    I don't recall the SW EU ever addressing the inevitable physical consequences of the DS2's explosion over Endor.
    Yep, the Rebel fleet anticipated the debris raining down on Endor so they intercepted it in orbit before it could do any damage.

    There's a particularly funny comic about an Imperial veteran several decades after Endor, sitting in a bar and telling his story of how the vicious, savage Ewoks methodically dismantled his stormtrooper squad, and he ends his story with "the only thing that lets me sleep at night is the knowledge that the Ewoks all burned in hell when the Death Star's debris rained down on their forest", and another bar patron chimes in and says, "Uhh the Rebel fleet intercepted all of the debris, the Ewoks are fine, dude." And the Imperial veteran has this thousand-yard stare on his face. It's pretty great.

    The DS2 debris interception gets mentioned in a couple other EU sources, too.

    I like the decimal moving idea, its just easy and believable.

    Much easier than trying to defy science with bullcraponium. The idea of the planet actually being that small is dumb, just move the decimal like the Tech Manual did.
    Thank you. :)

    What's great about the Aliens series is that it tries to stick to science.  I mean it is still science fiction so there are some deviations, but for the most part, me don't have things like magic, time travel, the force, or the schwartz.  So wherever it is possible to stick to reality, I think it is preferable.  I would suggest that in future printings, a more realistic number for the planet's diameter is used, unless there is a hidden reason for the number being the way it is.
    Don't get me wrong, there's potential for interesting stuff if the planet actually IS an Engineer construct and that's why it's impossibly dense, it's just that no source has even hinted at that. Like, an impossibly dense dwarf planet would be the astronomy find of the millennium, science probes would have picked up on it immediately and you've have science teams swarming all over the place just for its physical properties alone. Like, screw finding alien life, the planet itself would be more scientifically important. We're talking Solaris-level scientific importance and response, not just sending 150 colonists there to toil around in the dirt.

    I really wish the WY Report had used some critical thinking and independent thought rather than slavish, dogmatic adherence to "the source material", because not only did it goof up LV-426's size, but it similarly goofed up LV-223 while it was at it (1400km diameter, lol). And LV-223 can't even be blamed on "the source material", since the WY Report was fabricating the number from whole cloth.
    At least with the WY Report it can easily be chalked up to a typo "in universe".
  25. Perfect-Organism
    What's great about the Aliens series is that it tries to stick to science.  I mean it is still science fiction so there are some deviations, but for the most part, me don't have things like magic, time travel, the force, or the schwartz.  So wherever it is possible to stick to reality, I think it is preferable.  I would suggest that in future printings, a more realistic number for the planet's diameter is used, unless there is a hidden reason for the number being the way it is.
  26. 426Buddy
    I like the decimal moving idea, its just easy and believable.

    Much easier than trying to defy science with bullcraponium. The idea of the planet actually being that small is dumb, just move the decimal like the Tech Manual did.
  27. Local Trouble
    Quote
    Yes.  She had the data in front of her face.

    And she mis-read it and dropped a zero. I work with numbers every day, I see people do it all the time. It's called "human error".
    Surely you can come up with a better reason?

    What does SM say about it?

    Quote
    Common scientific knowledge also tells us that Endor got destroyed when the second Death Star exploded over it.
    That's hardly comparable, and the Star Wars EU even addressed it specifically.
    Likewise, LV-426's size got addressed too: Lambert mis-spoke.

    Again, surely you've got a better reason?

    Like it's not even like the 12,000 number is a fan construct, it comes from a canon source and specifically addresses an error in the movie. Blindly accepting the movie's number "just cuz" is like the pinnacle of fanboyism and cognitive dissonance.

    I don't recall the SW EU ever addressing the inevitable physical consequences of the DS2's explosion over Endor.
  28. Xenomrph
    Quote
    Yes.  She had the data in front of her face.
    And she mis-read it and dropped a zero. I work with numbers every day, I see people do it all the time. It's called "human error".
    Surely you can come up with a better reason?

    Quote
    Common scientific knowledge also tells us that Endor got destroyed when the second Death Star exploded over it.
    That's hardly comparable, and the Star Wars EU even addressed it specifically.
    Likewise, LV-426's size got addressed too: Lambert mis-spoke.

    Again, surely you've got a better reason?

    Like it's not even like the 12,000 number is a fan construct, it comes from a canon source and specifically addresses an error in the movie. Blindly accepting the movie's number "just cuz" is like the pinnacle of fanboyism and cognitive dissonance.
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