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Janty Yates Talks Alien: Covenant & Prometheus Costume Design

Janty Yates talks Alien: Covenant & Prometheus costume design in a new interview with Collider. Janty Yates is a long time collaborator of Ridley Scott and worked alongside Ridley Scott for his 2012 return to the world of Alien and science-fiction with Prometheus. She also worked with him again in this year’s immensely successful The Martian and will continue in that capacity for Alien: Covenant.

In the interview with Collider she mentions she has designed 2 new spacesuits for Alien: Covenant which Ridley Scott has signed off on. Yates also says that whilst they have designed new spacesuits for the film, Alien: Covenant is “not so much of a spacesuit movie.” She also confirmed that David’s would have the same spacesuit design as he had in Prometheus.

Janty Yates talks Alien: Covenant & Prometheus costume design in a new interview with Collider. Janty Yates Talks Alien: Covenant & Prometheus Costume Design

Janty Yates talks Alien: Covenant & Prometheus costume design in a new interview with Collider.

Janty Yates also stated that Alien: Covenant takes place 10 years after Prometheus, placing it around 2103/04. Yates mentions that their first “roundtable meeting” regarding Alien: Covenant was at the end of August but that officially prep work on the Prometheus sequel began a few weeks ago. Yates also said that shooting would commence in April.

The Alien and Prometheus related talk commences at about 13 minutes into the interview. She also talks about her role as a costume designer and her work on her other movies. You can find the whole interview over at Collider.



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  1. Corporal Hicks
    Even then, that might not be the case after Alien 3.2.

    Personally I've come to the conclusion that canon just doesn't matter. It's what they say it is and it can change at a whim. Just enjoy what you enjoy.
  2. CainsSon
    I hated the reason Weyland wanted to be there (eternal life) in Lindelof's draft, and thought the terraforming tech was a better idea...

    I liked that it was better reasoned in Engineers but I wouldn't have minded it Prometheus had it actually been setup. Like with Spaiht's having the upgrading humanity evidence.

    Quote
    I can't come down on one side of the fence because the best draft was somewhere in between.
    ...
    Overall, I think the problem is simple and present with both versions: There are too many ideas without enough connective tissue.

    That's fair enough and I can really see where you're coming from. I do agree that both versions had some aspects right and others wrong. I just think that Engineer's would have required less work to make it more solid.

    I can agree with that. In fact, I think if Lindeloff had only made a few of the changes that he did, namely, having made David less villainous and developing the characters (maybe even a bit more), and limiting a great deal of the facehuggers and been-there-done-that stuff, while keeping the ponderous stuff more in the subtext... I think, basically he made the changes he needed to and then didn't know where to stop. I think having the Engineer DO something strange after he had been woken up, strange the way the opening was strange, I think that was key to making that last act feel in step with the rest of it, and neither of them figured that out. Instead, it was just - SURPRISE! He wants to kill us!! Only, that was as predictable as a chestburster scene getting tacked onto the end.

    And what's really most head scratching about PROMETHEUS that the entire first 2/3 of the film seems so filled with strange, interesting, head scratching ideas to make us want more, as the intensity ramps up, and then the entire last quarter of the film, is predicable run of the mill crap.

    I hope this film opens with someone saying "This will begin to make things right."
  3. Corporal Hicks
    I hated the reason Weyland wanted to be there (eternal life) in Lindelof's draft, and thought the terraforming tech was a better idea...

    I liked that it was better reasoned in Engineers but I wouldn't have minded it Prometheus had it actually been setup. Like with Spaiht's having the upgrading humanity evidence.

    Quote
    I can't come down on one side of the fence because the best draft was somewhere in between.
    ...
    Overall, I think the problem is simple and present with both versions: There are too many ideas without enough connective tissue.

    That's fair enough and I can really see where you're coming from. I do agree that both versions had some aspects right and others wrong. I just think that Engineer's would have required less work to make it more solid.
  4. CainsSon
    Oh, thought you guys actually meant that you would rather have the Spaihts script as is over Prometheus...

    I would. Even as it is it's better.

    Indeed. Even with its weaknesses, Alien: Engineers is still better than Prometheus. All Prometheus' strengths were visual and they'd come across easily enough. Only difference between the 2 that Prometheus has over Engineers is David - and I wonder how much of that was purely Fassbender? I can't remember what Lindelof really did to the character.

    I don't agree that either script was better. As much as I think Lindeloff was right in changing the style of the film away from the traditional Alien stuff and I liked the changes to David's character, I felt the Engineers only worked in the opening scene and that was true of both drafts. Their tech was out-of-universe. It doesn't match the world of Alien. The one thing that did work with their tech though, WAS in Spaihts draft. I hated the reason Weyland wanted to be there (eternal life) in Lindelof's draft, and thought the terraforming tech was a better idea... I also agree with the exclusion of LV426 but think the entire second half of Lindeloff's script was a giant mess. Lindelof was right with thinking I did not just want to see aliens killing people but he was wrong in thinking the Engineers were driving the second half of the script. He woke it up and didn't know what to do with it. There was no sense of wonder because the Engineer did nothing of interest.  Also of note is that in the Spaihts draft the characters were even more cookie-cutter. But overall I liked his sense of reasoning better. In Lindelof's draft the motivations of characters drive the plot up until Weyland and the Engineer are woken up and then they dropped the ball miserably.
    In Spaihts draft the motivations of the characters is ruined by making David so villainous.

    I can't come down on one side of the fence because the best draft was somewhere in between. Lindeloff got rid of too much and changed things that worked but he also got rid of a lot of the right things and changed NOTABLY the characters, for the better. Also both scripts got things wrong and didn't follow through on the Engineer stuff correctly. I think Spaihts version made the Engineers feel even more tacked on. Neither script integrated the Engineers well and that is the biggest thing Prometheus gets wrong. I wasn't interested in the middle section of either script and the ending of both sucked. The ending just sucked all around, I think.

    Overall, I think the problem is simple and present with both versions: There are too many ideas without enough connective tissue. The entire thing needed to be simplified. I think Lindelof simplified some things rightly, and then introduced more things incorrectly.
  5. david8
    No doubt Fassbender had a lot to do with it, but the characterization on script was just as interesting as it was portrayed. David's lines, idiosyncrasies and subtleties were made possible thanks to Lindelof's re-write of the character, in the Spaihts script he's just Ash 2.0. It took someone of Fassbender's calibre to bring such a nuanced character to life and I think Lindy deserves credit for it.
  6. Corporal Hicks
    Oh, thought you guys actually meant that you would rather have the Spaihts script as is over Prometheus...

    I would. Even as it is it's better.

    Indeed. Even with its weaknesses, Alien: Engineers is still better than Prometheus. All Prometheus' strengths were visual and they'd come across easily enough. Only difference between the 2 that Prometheus has over Engineers is David - and I wonder how much of that was purely Fassbender? I can't remember what Lindelof really did to the character. 
  7. whiterabbit
    Oh, thought you guys actually meant that you would rather have the Spaihts script as is over Prometheus... wait a minute, by that logic Prometheus script could have been fixed too. So yea it is either or in this hypothetical choice. Lets just say Spaihts script was filmed as is. Would that still be better than Prometheus? Yea I know you guys love that Spaihts script more. So this is a rhetorical question.

    Yea not arguing over which script was better as a movie but even tweaking Spaihts script doesn't make it all that more appealing.
  8. HuDaFuK
    Yea but it was a xeno smorgasbord. Aliens born and slaughtered inside of minutes but hapless humans. How could that possibly advance the franchise? It's been a while since I read though it but I can't see how the fail is any less than Prometheus.

    Every time anyone says they preferred Spaihts script the instant retort is "but the Aliens were too weak!", when we've said literally every time that the script needed tidying up to address that.

    But even in it's unpolished state, it's still leagues better than the mess that we got.
  9. Corporal Hicks
    As I said, it wasn't perfect and we've said a few times it needed a good polish. It would have been awesome to see the Ultramorph but my preference of it comes from the fact that it's simply a more coherent script and the characters are better written.
  10. whiterabbit
    Come on guys you can't honestly have wanted Spaihts draft more?

    Absolutely. It at least made sense and had characters that weren't total morons.

    Indeed. It wasn't perfect but it was certainly stronger than Prometheus.
    Yea but it was a xeno smorgasbord. Aliens born and slaughtered inside of minutes but hapless humans. How could that possibly advance the franchise? It's been a while since I read though it but I can't see how the fail is any less than Prometheus.

    You guys just wanna see those ultramorphs don't yea. >:(

  11. whiterabbit
    Come on guys you can't honestly have wanted Spaihts draft more? True it would have been a coherent movie but at the same time if would have made for an awful alien movie. I think if that movie was made it would have done serious damage to the franchise compared to Prometheus. People would have said the Alien is dead... from just how many "super" aliens were killed in the most mundane ways.

    Also, Prometheus is fine the way it is. Scott and Co are just dropping the charred and admitting that this is an Alien series with the name change. I can already see him saying, you know, what ever happened to that thing that was born out of the engineer from the end of Prometheus. Why hasn't no one told his story yet. :P The movie was too big for two hours and got the f**k out of control. However it set up the game pieces just fine. The engineers, the science, the death and tragedy.

    The way I see it, the alien is Prometheus. It hands over an egg to the engineers as depicted in the mural. They're first true piece of ultra advance modern biotechnology, that they then went all Weyland-Yutani over and created bioweapons galore. The engineers are basically the corporations scientist, bioweapons division.
  12. The Alien Predator
    So logically, the Marines should have some really powerful gear. I remember reading on the wiki (I know it's not reliable, but this was an interesting point) that the Marines are given outdated equipment by the United Americas, I'm not sure if that was mentioned in the Colonial Marines Technical Manual. But if this is true, it should be incorporated into any future films to explain why the Marines had what they had and other armies back home have better equipment to cut costs etc.

    I like this idea! It's makes sense. It could even be a strategic decision. The marines are armed well enough to handle anything they would encounter during their normal operations without revealing the latest, greatest, or most destructive weapons.

    That's also a good point. I think mainly when they go for pests, they bring out some of the more obsolete stuff but in war, they may be given better things.

    I'd love to see a film of Marines facing some human colonial insurgency somewhere who has found some "bio weapons" (Aliens) and is experimenting on people, then the Marines arrive and have to face not only Aliens but also well armed rebels. It'd be nice to see some vehicles like futuristic tanks and even some mechs.
  13. HuDaFuK
    David was also the best thing about Prometheus and arguably the most intriguing android in any of the Alien films.

    I completely agree, I loved Fassbender. I just wish he could've got a better film to play that part in.

    I also agree with everything else you're saying, I'm just pointing out that with David in the new movie there's always going to be that niggling knowledge of where he came from. And that'll be worse if they're simply going to throw out everything else from Prometheus, because it seems incredibly petulant to simply discard a story that isn't finished because you did such a half-arsed job of it... yet at the same time make a sequel with a returning character.
  14. The Eighth Passenger
    Trouble with that is, David's back. So it can't possibly be a clean slate.

    David was also the best thing about Prometheus and arguably the most intriguing android in any of the Alien films. The slate doesn't need to be perfectly clean, they just need to really downplay the first film to the extent that it makes absolutely zero difference whether you've seen Prometheus beforehand or not. It must be able to stand on it's own as a self-contained movie like you said.

    If Scott really hits a home run with this film you wouldn't really want it to have a strong connection with an inferior prequel would you? Imagine if Alien followed after Alien: Resurrection but with so many narrative ties and plot points that you couldn't just ignore Resurrection in order to understand Alien. It would have tarnished Alien a bit don't you think?
  15. HuDaFuK
    What's with you? I thought you hated Prometheus' guts? Now you're all concerned about Shaw and the Deacon not returning.

    Hah! I don't hate its guts, it just annoys me because its a mess of a film, yet at every step they seemed to have a better movie that they then made worse by fiddling with it - from Spaihts' script to Lindelof's, then with several of the scenes they cut out for seemingly no good reason.

    I say start over with a clean slate, wipe the mess that is Prometheus under the carpet and pretend it never happened (mostly). Do a proper job this time around.

    Trouble with that is, David's back. So it can't possibly be a clean slate.
  16. The Eighth Passenger
    What's with you? I thought you hated Prometheus' guts? Now you're all concerned about Shaw and the Deacon not returning.

    I say start over with a clean slate, wipe the mess that is Prometheus under the carpet and pretend it never happened (mostly). Do a proper job this time around.
  17. HuDaFuK
    Well yes, that's why I have such a big problem with films that require sequels and don't really stand on their own as a self-contained movie. But that scene in particular felt like nothing more than knee-jerk at the fact nothing had burst out of anything yet.
  18. XenoHunter99
    So logically, the Marines should have some really powerful gear. I remember reading on the wiki (I know it's not reliable, but this was an interesting point) that the Marines are given outdated equipment by the United Americas, I'm not sure if that was mentioned in the Colonial Marines Technical Manual. But if this is true, it should be incorporated into any future films to explain why the Marines had what they had and other armies back home have better equipment to cut costs etc.

    I like this idea! It's makes sense. It could even be a strategic decision. The marines are armed well enough to handle anything they would encounter during their normal operations without revealing the latest, greatest, or most destructive weapons.
  19. whiterabbit
    It's obviously not ignoring the movie - the main character is David. Just seems they've left LV223 and the Deacon behind. They went looking elsewhere.
    So if they follow the Prometheus theme, that leaves them 3 whole movies to f**k things up and create a new horrifying monster on each world they visit. It'd be funny if the whole point of these movies is how mankind goes out into space and f**ks everything up, ensuring tons of sequels to come.
  20. Hellspawn28
    I always hate if they are going to ignore on what happen last time if they are not going to ignore the last movie. The last movie open things up for more and it would piss me off if they are like "Yeah whatever. Let's not talk about it and move on!".
  21. Corporal Hicks
    So if it's set a decade later then are we ever going to find out on what happen at the end of the first movie. They did left the Planet with the Deacon being born at the end of the movie.

    That's another question, I think. On the face of it, it would look like Covenant is going to try and distance itself from Prometheus. How much that comes through in the narrative will be interesting to see.
  22. Liberator
    The technology will be a lot like we saw in Prometheus.  One of the unique aspects to it, which I found intriguing, was the use of musical tones that issued commands.  It conveyed a very light touch, and I imagine the engineers' home world as a place where a certain harmony exists, grown eerie and threatening by misuse.  I hope they flesh out this side of the engineers, who on the one hand are portrayed as very destructive in their efforts to create ("Sometimes in order to create, we must first destroy."), they also should on the other hand appreciate their creations, knowing how fragile they are.
  23. Hellspawn28
    So if it's set a decade later then are we ever going to find out on what happen at the end of the first movie. They did left the Planet with the Deacon being born at the end of the movie.
  24. Space7Horror
    I wonder how the film will handle technology, the Alien films are far into the furture and the technology in promethues was far more advanced in some aspects.  An exuse for that would be the fact that the ship was very expensives and owned by Weyland himself, but now we are getting a new ship. Im curious to see what it looks like and if it is similar to ships seen in the orginal films along with the tech used.
  25. TheBATMAN
    I understand why you say what you are saying here, but I think you are reading too much into Fox's motives for making the writers of FIRE AND STONE stay away from any content that would conflict with the Prometheus sequel. It doesn't mean they want the F&S story to remain canonical, per se. It simply means that they don't want any aspects of the P2 script revealed in the comics, ahead of time. It also further reinforces them from legal and payroll disputes over the ideas presented, should different writers come up with the same ideas twice.
    The fact that Fox made the writers of the comics change things, so as not to give away aspects of Prometheus 2, doesn't mean they did so so they can keep the EU canonical. I'm sure, in their minds that may be an added bonus, especially and only if fans respond well to the EU materials in question, but the de-facto reason is just a formality. They don't want things, they want the film to reveal, to be revealed before hand. Its really that simple and it is completely driven by the fact that the financial root is still, and is always, the films dictating what is canonical, without complicated cross pollination.
    The exception here may be Alien Isolation, but I would almost guarantee that the exception proves the rule in this case, because I wouldn't put it passed FOX to consider adapting that game into a film someday, but only based on how well received it was. In contrast, I'm pretty certain we wont see or hear any mention of a Colonial Marines adaptation based on how poorly that game was received. Heh.
    LSS The films are the raw material. Everything else, from the studio's perspective is cross-pollination and is, for better or worse, secondary.

    I think that may have been true, but that could easily have been stipulated when the comics were still in the initial writer's room phase. The fact that the entire first issue of the comic had to be scrapped after it had already been finished would suggest this was done to keep Fire and Stone canon, as well as elements of Prometheus 2 under wraps. The fact we now know Alien Covenant is set 10 years after Prometheus 2 probably explains why the timeframe of Prometheus Fire and Stone was suddenly put back 100 years. But the better evidence here is Lebbon's forced revision of Predator Incursion. That manuscript was already delivered to the publishers when he made those changes. We don't know what those changes were exactly other than it was something to do with Alien 5.

    Normally I would agree with you, but reading the Weyland-Yutani Report has completely changed my thinking on the Alien universe. Such a large effort has been made to weave everything together in such a way that it all makes sense. It's the perfect sourcebook and why I believe strongly that this new canon is all that matters anymore and the likes of AVP, Requiem and the old EU are long gone. All I can do to stress this point is urge people to get their hands on a copy and read it. Of course the films are absolute at the end of the day and stories like Out of the Shadows will not have much bearing on things going forward, but it's nice to know they actually happened.
  26. CainsSon
    The Covenant might have left earth much longer than 10 years ago. The events of Prometheus wouldn't necessarily have had any influence on the colony ship's date of departure. Perhaps they stumbled upon the planet or David radioed them an invite when he saw they were in the vicinity.

    Well it's probably just a Yutani ship init?

    I really hope the Yutani and Weyland merger doesn't have anything to do with the Alien. Its just unnecessary and convenient to tie things together so much. I hate when they do crap like that in prequels.

    Whilst I see your point, I don't agree with this case. Fire and Stone was edited heavily so as to not conflict with whatever the plans were for Prometheus 2 at the time. Likewise Lebbon had to edit his completed manuscript for Predator Incursion following the Alien 5 announcement. For the time being anyway, Fox seem to be going to a concerted effort with this rebooted canon, and the new novels are a big part of that.

    Having said all that,  Ridley Scott has always been his own man and I wouldn't put it past him to disregard anything he doesn't like.

    I understand why you say what you are saying here, but I think you are reading too much into Fox's motives for making the writers of FIRE AND STONE stay away from any content that would conflict with the Prometheus sequel. It doesn't mean they want the F&S story to remain canonical, per se. It simply means that they don't want any aspects of the P2 script revealed in the comics, ahead of time. It also further reinforces them from legal and payroll disputes over the ideas presented, should different writers come up with the same ideas twice.
    The fact that Fox made the writers of the comics change things, so as not to give away aspects of Prometheus 2, doesn't mean they did so so they can keep the EU canonical. I'm sure, in their minds that may be an added bonus, especially and only if fans respond well to the EU materials in question, but the de-facto reason is just a formality. They don't want things, they want the film to reveal, to be revealed before hand. Its really that simple and it is completely driven by the fact that the financial root is still, and is always, the films dictating what is canonical, without complicated cross pollination.
    The exception here may be Alien Isolation, but I would almost guarantee that the exception proves the rule in this case, because I wouldn't put it passed FOX to consider adapting that game into a film someday, but only based on how well received it was. In contrast, I'm pretty certain we wont see or hear any mention of a Colonial Marines adaptation based on how poorly that game was received. Heh.
    LSS The films are the raw material. Everything else, from the studio's perspective is cross-pollination and is, for better or worse, secondary.
  27. The Alien Predator
    @Guan Thwei 1992:
    If Star Wars taught us nothing else, It taught us this: If it didn't happen on screen, it didn't happen. Novels don't count.

    This isn't Star Wars.

    Doesn't matter. The lesson is universal. EU doesn't count. When film makers draw upon it, that's a bonus. But film makers are rarely bound by it. And rights holders can declare it null and void any time they like. Now, if Alien were based on a novel, like the tale of a certain annoying British wizard boy or a certain girl with a bow and arrow, the dynamics between book and movie might be a little different. But these Rage War novels don't matter a hill of beans to what we're ever going to see on the screen. Bitter pill, but that's the way it goes.

    I thought I'd share some examples of advancement within the EU regardless as it showed some things I felt were close to what you were describing earlier that you wanted to see on film.  :)
    Yes, and that part is really cool! My bad for failing to mention it. :)

    It's alright.  ;D

    I understand why you made your point though, you are correct, war does drive technological innovations, lots of things were discovered during our past major wars. The Cold War for instance landed a man on the moon due to the competition of world super powers.

    So logically, the Marines should have some really powerful gear. I remember reading on the wiki (I know it's not reliable, but this was an interesting point) that the Marines are given outdated equipment by the United Americas, I'm not sure if that was mentioned in the Colonial Marines Technical Manual. But if this is true, it should be incorporated into any future films to explain why the Marines had what they had and other armies back home have better equipment to cut costs etc.
  28. XenoHunter99
    @Guan Thwei 1992:
    If Star Wars taught us nothing else, It taught us this: If it didn't happen on screen, it didn't happen. Novels don't count.

    This isn't Star Wars.

    Doesn't matter. The lesson is universal. EU doesn't count. When film makers draw upon it, that's a bonus. But film makers are rarely bound by it. And rights holders can declare it null and void any time they like. Now, if Alien were based on a novel, like the tale of a certain annoying British wizard boy or a certain girl with a bow and arrow, the dynamics between book and movie might be a little different. But these Rage War novels don't matter a hill of beans to what we're ever going to see on the screen. Bitter pill, but that's the way it goes.

    I thought I'd share some examples of advancement within the EU regardless as it showed some things I felt were close to what you were describing earlier that you wanted to see on film.  :)
    Yes, and that part is really cool! My bad for failing to mention it. :)
  29. TheBATMAN
    Whilst I see your point, I don't agree with this case. Fire and Stone was edited heavily so as to not conflict with whatever the plans were for Prometheus 2 at the time. Likewise Lebbon had to edit his completed manuscript for Predator Incursion following the Alien 5 announcement. For the time being anyway, Fox seem to be going to a concerted effort with this rebooted canon, and the new novels are a big part of that.

    Having said all that,  Ridley Scott has always been his own man and I wouldn't put it past him to disregard anything he doesn't like.
  30. The Alien Predator
    @Guan Thwei 1992:
    If Star Wars taught us nothing else, It taught us this: If it didn't happen on screen, it didn't happen. Novels don't count.

    This isn't Star Wars.

    Doesn't matter. The lesson is universal. EU doesn't count. When film makers draw upon it, that's a bonus. But film makers are rarely bound by it. And rights holders can declare it null and void any time they like. Now, if Alien were based on a novel, like the tale of a certain annoying British wizard boy or a certain girl with a bow and arrow, the dynamics between book and movie might be a little different. But these Rage War novels don't matter a hill of beans to what we're ever going to see on the screen. Bitter pill, but that's the way it goes.

    I thought I'd share some examples of advancement within the EU regardless as it showed some things I felt were close to what you were describing earlier that you wanted to see on film.  :)
  31. Primordial
    Time dilation affects those who are traveling at relativistic speeds.  In fact traveling at 90% the speed of light only yields a ratio of 0.436 : 1

    So for every year that passes to the stationary observer, the crew of the ship experiences about 159 days.  Time is definitely slowed down, but not by that much.  Things start getting interesting if you can approach 99.9% the speed of light. 

    If Covenant takes place 10 years after Prometheus, we are looking at a date of 2103?

    Assuming (for fun) the ship was launched in 2030 with sub FTL, but could travel at 99.9% of the speed of light.  The time dilation ratio is 0.045 to 1

    1) The planet they land on is about 80LY from earth

    2) 80yr x 365 days = 29,200 days as observed from earth

    3) It would take 3.7 years accelerating at 1g to hit 99.9% the speed of light, and the same in amount of time to decelerate to a stop.  The ship would travel 20.7LY during the acceleration, and 20.7LY during the deceleration.  38.6LY would be spent traveling at the .045 time dilation.

    3) 38.6 years = 14,089 days x .045 = 634 days (or 1.7 yrs) pass to the people on the Covenant.

    4) 3.7 + 1.7 +3.7 = 9.1 years pass to the crew members of the Covenant on flight of 80LY, traveling at 99.9% the speed of light, and accelerating/decelerating at 1g.

    :)  Watch my math be totally wrong

    This kind of post treating science is often a pleasure to read. Clear and concise.
    It shows the necessity of having cryosleep for such ships. It also indicates a trip from Earth to LV-426 wouldn't even reach the 99,9% of speed of light that it would start to decelerate.

    Quote
    Obviously "half a billion" rolls off the tongue better than 2.0574749335x10^14th

    Yes... and that emphasis was made on her being far away from Earth. In Paradise's final script, it's writen "half a billion sodding miles". It doesn't bother me from Vickers.
    If Holloway and Shaw announced this figure during their pre-landing presentation in a serious manner, then that would be really disturbing.
  32. NickisSmart
    Nice.  More importantly, though, no one in Hollywood gives a shit if you're math was right or not.  Remember... the Narcissus took 57 years to 'float through the core systems' and you can bet Cameron wasn't too interested in whether the shuttle had FTL or not to tell his story.  Presumably, it lacks that function. 

    After all, it took Voyager 36 years to enter interstellar space... it's a long haul between the Solar System's outer edge and the next stop without the luxury of FTL no matter how you add the figures up. 

    Either way, 'ALIEN' depicts a fair fictional representation of space travel.  It is hard, awkward, uncomfortable, costly, dangerous and lonely.   I think that's more important in terms of telling a story than getting the math right. 

    Unless it's non-fiction, accuracy be damned, I say.   Never let the facts get in the way of telling a good story.  ;)

    -Windebieste.

    Well said. Accuracy can get in the way of telling a good story.
  33. XenoHunter99
    @Guan Thwei 1992:
    If Star Wars taught us nothing else, It taught us this: If it didn't happen on screen, it didn't happen. Novels don't count.

    This isn't Star Wars.

    Doesn't matter. The lesson is universal. EU doesn't count. When film makers draw upon it, that's a bonus. But film makers are rarely bound by it. And rights holders can declare it null and void any time they like. Now, if Alien were based on a novel, like the tale of a certain annoying British wizard boy or a certain girl with a bow and arrow, the dynamics between book and movie might be a little different. But these Rage War novels don't matter a hill of beans to what we're ever going to see on the screen. Bitter pill, but that's the way it goes.
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