Latest News

Neill Blomkamp: Alien 3 & Resurrection “Went Off The Rails”

In a discussion with Dazed Digital, Neill Blomkamp spoke a little about his upcoming Alien 5 project and how he felt that Alien 3 and Alien Resurrection “went off the rails“. The more Neill Blomkamp talks about the project, the more it seems pretty obvious that his upcoming project is going to be an alternate sequel to Aliens:

“It’s the inverse in that now I get to make the third film of the first two, which I think never happened. I think they made the first two and then went off the rails with these other ones. I wanna try as a fan to fill in that gap. It all stems from being probably one of the most ego-less directors in Hollywood and I think that that plays a big role. If you’re inward focused and narcissistic and thinking about your fans then that’s when weird shit starts happening. If you stay grounded then you can make stuff that actually is balanced and has something to say. I don’t want to give much away but what I can say confidently is that Alien and Aliens are my favourite films and where it went after Aliens was incorrect to me as a fan. I didn’t want that world, I wanted the first two and that’s what I want to go back to.”

020315_02 Neill Blomkamp: Alien 3 & Resurrection

Thanks to Tough little S.O.B. and Perfect-Organism for the link.



Post Comment
Comments: 399
« Newer Comments 12345678 Older Comments »
  1. DoomRulz
    It features a Predalien.

    http://i.ytimg.com/vi/aObyBHTY2RU/maxresdefault.jpg

    Avoid the film, unless you have company and a truckload of intoxicating substances.

    OMG!!  That's such a cool pic!!! :o  Sometimes it amazes me that I'm the only one here who likes AVPR, I'm sure it surprises you guys too but I imagine for completely different reasons. :P

    No, I like it as well.
  2. Xenomorphine
    If you look at it like that, the battered frontiersmen (colonists) and hardened grunts (Marines) that the previous film brought to the series weren't at all inventive either.

    Indeed - and were never intended to be perceived as such. Cameron was never shy about it effectively being a Vietnam analogy in space. It was just done very well, that's all.

    Quote
    My point was, it was an added element to the universe of the franchise, and one I found quite interesting.

    Well, technically, you could say 'Aliens' introduced the concept of the existence of prisoners, even if it was just going by hints of the Marines' back-stories. :)

    The actual prison scenario would have been more interesting if it had been an operational facility, in my view.

    The main idea added in A3 was that the Alien takes on the form of it's host. I.E the Dog/Ox Alien.
    And then they never used that idea again.

    Fully agreed. Always thought that they should have done so. Even then, the concept didn't really add much, sadly, because the differences were fairly minimal.
  3. T Dog
    To be honest I think me and some friends might have skimmed through it one night because it was so awful.

    Forgot about the PredAlien.
    But I meant the Alien being combined with other earth animals really.
  4. HuDaFuK
    That's not anything radically inventive. Prisoners in desolate wastelands is a story element which has been around long before science-fiction. Would expect it probably features in a lot of sci-fi (both early and later) in general, too.

    If you look at it like that, the battered frontiersmen (colonists) and hardened grunts (Marines) that the previous film brought to the series weren't at all inventive either. My point was, it was an added element to the universe of the franchise, and one I found quite interesting.
  5. Xenomorphine
    That's not anything radically inventive. Prisoners in desolate wastelands is a story element which has been around long before science-fiction. Would expect it probably features in a lot of sci-fi (both early and later) in general, too.

    However, didn't the characters in the film volunteer to stay behind, years bfore Ripley arrived? Hence, why everything was in disrepair and hardly any wardens existed?
  6. HuDaFuK
    A3 went off the rails for me in the sense that it was almost a subtraction of what Aliens did by expanding the scope of the mythos, at least the human side of things with the colonists and marines.

    Of course Alien 3 expanded the mythos. It gave us the whole concept of convicts being shot out into space and left to rot. That's a pretty significant and powerful image. The way future society deals with its undesirables.
  7. Gilfryd
    A3 went off the rails for me in the sense that it was almost a subtraction of what Aliens did by expanding the scope of the mythos, at least the human side of things with the colonists and marines. 3 should have gone the other way by going (or at least hinting heavily) with the Aliens' origins. This is definitely a reflection of what I would've wanted to see but it should have been more of an adventure with Ripley and co after the Jockeys, instead of Ripley (and Ripley alone) surrounded by a bunch of bald rapists on another lonely human outpost.
  8. DoomRulz
    It seems to me that he doesn't have a clue what he wants.

    It is very likely be that it's still early days yet and he can't say anything more than he already has. It's the media making everything seem so confusing, anyways. Blomkamp was pretty clear about his film directly following on from Aliens, while his comment about 3 and Res came off as him simply being respectful of the filmmakers and the fans.

    This film will likely suffer a number of leaks given its importance. I wouldn't be surprised if the script gets out, to be honest.
  9. OpenMaw
    More or less. It can depend on the production, of course, but pre-production generally includes getting the script past the treatment/spec-script phase and usually takes a few months to get it ready for shooting. EX of this going wrong of course: Alien 3 took too long in pre-production and just hit their production schedule with a chaotic script situation.

    At this point, from what little Blomkamp has said is everything seems to be line up for shooting to start later in the year if things go smoothly. Hopefully, they don't muddy the waters and have a dozen goddamn writers try and "fix" things.
  10. OpenMaw
    Isn't the reason why Sigourney Weaver is part of the cast is because she was blown away by the script?  I think Blomkamp has a very clear idea of what he wants, it's just that he's keeping people in the dark for now.

    The pitch would be the more accurate term. I doubt Blomkamp has even a first draft screenplay yet. He could have a treatment ready by this point. Though all of that really depends on how much time he has had lately to work on it.
  11. Nightmare Asylum
    We don't know if there's a script yet (I'm inclined to think that there is, or at least a draft), and yeah, his ideas impressed Sigourney and convinced her to take on this installment in the series after passing on many others (namely the old "Alien 5 on Earth" story pitches).
  12. Born Of Cold Light
    Isn't the reason why Sigourney Weaver is part of the cast is because she was blown away by the script?  I think Blomkamp has a very clear idea of what he wants, it's just that he's keeping people in the dark for now.
  13. Nightmare Asylum
    It seems to me that he doesn't have a clue what he wants.

    It is very likely be that it's still early days yet and he can't say anything more than he already has. It's the media making everything seem so confusing, anyways. Blomkamp was pretty clear about his film directly following on from Aliens, while his comment about 3 and Res came off as him simply being respectful of the filmmakers and the fans.
  14. DoomRulz
    I always thought Alien 3 steered it back on to the rails. Not wholly successfully for sure, it all gets a bit unfocused after Clemens and Andrews are dispatched, but it had far more interesting ideas than it's predecessor.  A L I E N  and Alien 3 aren't really popcorn movies, whereas the other two sort of are. Although Resurrection is just too dire and silly to get any pleasure from. Maybe Alien 3 is too bleak to actually enjoy as such, but it's not stupid.  A L I E N  remains the only one that is actually a scary horror movie, and I think it unlikely that Alien 5 will manage to be as terrifying, I just can't see it taking that route.

    I don't see why Alien 5 can't replicate the tension of the first film. I realize the last bunch of Alien outings have been lackluster, but let's not write it off yet before we know what's going on.
  15. SpreadEagleBeagle
    I always thought Alien 3 steered it back on to the rails. Not wholly successfully for sure, it all gets a bit unfocused after Clemens and Andrews are dispatched, but it had far more interesting ideas than it's predecessor.  A L I E N  and Alien 3 aren't really popcorn movies, whereas the other two sot of are. Although Resurrection is just too dire and silly to get any pleasure from. Maybe Alien 3 is too bleak to actually enjoy as such, but it's not stupid.  A L I E N  remains the only one that is actually a scary horror movie, and I think it unlikely that Alien 5 will manage to be as terrifying, I just can't see it taking that route.

    Nailed it!
  16. Gash
    I always thought Alien 3 steered it back on to the rails. Not wholly successfully for sure, it all gets a bit unfocused after Clemens and Andrews are dispatched, but it had far more interesting ideas than it's predecessor.  A L I E N  and Alien 3 aren't really popcorn movies, whereas the other two sort of are. Although Resurrection is just too dire and silly to get any pleasure from. Maybe Alien 3 is too bleak to actually enjoy as such, but it's not stupid.  A L I E N  remains the only one that is actually a scary horror movie, and I think it unlikely that Alien 5 will manage to be as terrifying, I just can't see it taking that route.
  17. HuDaFuK
    This suspense is largely missing from the Alien 3 film but was part of Ward's script, with the fire burning the placebut ultimately the setting itself, while largely interesting was too fanciful and needed to be set somewhere else.

    What about the impending arrival of the Weyland-Yutani team?

    I agree the suspense of it wasn't particularly effectively put forward in the film, but neither was the destruction of the wooden planet in Ward's script to be honest. It was kinda just happening in the background, right until the end. I never really got a sense of urgency.
  18. CainsSon
    See I think Ward's intention was to say the Alien growing in her was the manifestation of her guilt, her Superego - kind of creating a vrigin conception - like a distortion of the Nativity.

    I also think that script had a LOT of potential to make a better Alien film than it did, but that script was also a bit too out there. They managed to keep some of the ideas in tact but they needed to keep some ideas they did not either.

    A big problem I have with ALIEN 3 that I think WAS part of Ward's script and every film in the series ACCEPT Alien 3 - is the instability of the setting of the film.
    Meaning that in Aliens and Alien we are confronted with a fragile setting. In Alien 3 they tried to make that so with NO WEAPONS and Dangerous criminals/prisoners but in ALIEN, we have the fear of killing the alien eating away at the ship, and then the self destruction device, and in aliens,the atmospheric processor is going to explode, so there is that race against time to survive. This suspense is largely missing from the Alien 3 film but was part of Ward's script, with the fire burning the placebut ultimately the setting itself, while largely interesting was too fanciful and needed to be set somewhere else.
  19. NetworkATTH
    How is its plot not as thick as Alien or Aliens?

    I never implied it wasn't.

    Apologies, I must have been thrown off when you said...

    It's plot is as thick as it's predecessors.

    It's not but that's besides the point,

    I thought we were discussing how rich and tick the plots are, comparing Ward's idea to the final product.

    It was a mix up. I did actually say, that it didn't have a thick plot the second quote, but I'm just tired. I'm kind of on the fence about how thick its plot is, but I'm of the opinion that the Assembly Cut is capable enough, but the theatrical cut isn't. So the theatrical cut really isn't, as good as its predecessors, while the Assembly Cut is. Thus the mix up.

    I must admit I'm somewhat confused about the point Network is trying to make. Can you clarify?

    I'm not a native English speaker :P

    But I'll try my best. All I'm saying, is that the Ward script, while pretty Out-There, had many elements, such as the development of Ripley's character, that should not have been changed as much. The logic of the change being, the Ward script had problems, so they recycled the ideas, but removed a lot that worked about the script.

    The central idea of Ripley's character is as follows. You can read it from the basic Freud's structural understanding of the psyche. Although it is long out dated, it still is a great way, to analyze characters transformations, and balances within the self. Knowing how Freudian Alien is, it is perfect, that something along these lines, is put in the context of Alien.

    The Id, is the basic part of the mind. It controls our urges for sex, water, hunger, sleep, and our impulses, it's our desire to survive. It's the trigger that shoots out when you think "Huh, my mouth is dry, I could use a glass of water." or in other circumstances "There is an Alien organism on board the Nostromo, I gotta get out of here alive at all costs." It is also, interpretable as sin. It's the easiest part of us that is subject for our desires, of all the seven deadly sins. Gluttony, Lust, Greed, Hubris, Wrath, Vanity, and Sloth. The easiest way to understand this, is that it is the part of you that helps you survive, but it's also the part of you that lacks serious impulse control, and so naturally comes into conflict with a Christian society. But most of all, one can see the Alien itself as a giant Id. It is a primitive being that is just, pure, total Id.

    The Ego is the middle man, that manages between Super-Ego, and Id.It seeks to please the id's drive in realistic ways that will benefit in the long term rather than bring grief. The ego is the judgment, tolerance, reality testing, control, planning, defense, synthesis of information, intellectual functioning, and memory, of what makes you, you! The ego separates out what is real. It helps us to organize our thoughts and make sense of them and the world around us. The ego is that part of the id which has been modified by the direct influence of the external world.  Its task is to find a balance between primitive drives and reality while satisfying the id and super-ego. Its main concern is with the individual's safety and allows some of the id's desires to be expressed, but only when consequences of these actions are marginal. Consequences, that for Ripley in Alien and Aliens, did not exist, and she gave into pure Id, only the will to survive no matter the cost. A colony nuked from orbit? "You can bill me." Running down corridors with flashing light and fire and an Alien chasing you, with everyone you know killed, can throw things out of balance, into a state of trauma, of Id.

    The Super-Ego reflects the internalization of cultural rules, mainly taught by parents applying their guidance and influence. It's tradition, religion, faith, you get the idea. The installation of the super-ego can be described as a successful instance of identification with the parental agency. The super-ego works in contradiction to the id. The super-ego strives to act in a socially appropriate manner, whereas the id just wants instant self-gratification. The super-ego controls our sense of right and wrong and guilt. It helps us fit into society by getting us to act in socially acceptable ways. Ripley, had to turn off her Super-Ego temporarily and thrive in the fight or flight/rush or die, manner, of Alien and Aliens. These are also the monks who are representative of it.

    Bare in mind none of this is actually how human psychology works, this has been mostly proven false. Psychology actually relies more on your own health. But that's another story.

    What does this all mean?

    It means, from Ward's script, Ripley is exhausted after Aliens. She is floating in space, recovering from the trauma she endured. But the self is out of balance, there is an unbalance of Id within her that has to be corrected, so an inner turmoil must take place, she has to confront her demons, in one last mission.

    She crash lands and it just is her. She's pregnant with an Alien (overload of Id). The monks exist as the Super-Ego extreme to the Alien. The Alien represents out of control Id. They see Ripley for what she is, Id, something they totally reject, they humiliate and ban her, because she is foriegn to them just as the Alien. Anthony and John that help her, is the Super-Ego trying to help a solution. The Wooden World itself is the ego Ripley left behind she cannot recognize, it is the protocol she followed in the beginning of Alien, her unwillingness to let Kane in, her suspicion of Ash, it is, installed memory. It's wooden, and old, the monks who live in it, is the Super-Ego of herself she does not recognize, from her old Ego. She, is just a representation of Ripley, self image.

    The journey through the planet plays with the nature of this, I think you get my idea, or I hope I'm clearing up some confusion.

    I'm just saying, along these lines, these are great ideas. But it's understandable how they got lost in the chaos of Alien 3's production. To a board room executive who doesn't know Id from Ego, Freud sounds like a bunch of unprofitable horse shit. So, Giler and Hill try their best to adapt elements of it, and David Fincher probably tries to fight for ways to bring this forward, met with combat from Giler and Hill and Fox, and everyone else. On top of him being anti-social and really mad, that production isn't going the way he really wanted.

    In the end, what's good, from Ward's script, what they were going for, in Ripley's character progression, exists in a way, but it's really not given the same sense of urgency of the development of Ripley's character in relation to her past memories and past life aside from the line "You've been in my life so long I don't remember anything else" which Fox fought Fincher not to include.

    In other words, it's a visually stunning film I love in assembly format, but wouldn't it have been great if the visuals reflected what they implied.
  20. Alien³
    I don't wanna put words in his mouth but I think he's saying Ward's script had a lot interesting of stuff going for it, something the filmmakers had at their disposal when making Alien 3. And that its a shame only fragments of his story made it through to the final product.
« Newer Comments 12345678 Older Comments »
Facebook Twitter Instagram Steam RSS Feed